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Link: CRTC quest for quality set to shake up Canadian production

From  Susan Naokes of CBC News:

CRTC quest for quality set to shake up Canadian production
The federal broadcast regulator says its new rules on Canadian content are about creating better quality TV, but industry watchers are divided over whether the new regime will work.

In releasing new rules about Canadian content last week, CRTC chair Jean-Pierre Blais seemed to be posing the same questions Canadian TV consumers might ask — how can we be in the golden age of TV when Canada has not produced any shows with the stature of Downton Abbey or Game of Thrones? Continue reading.

Greg David
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Greg David

Prior to becoming a television critic and partner at TV, Eh?, Greg David was a critic for TV Guide Canada, the country's most trusted source for TV news. He has interviewed television actors, actresses and behind-the-scenes folks from countless programs. Survivor winners, Donald Trump, Jerry Bruckheimer ... he has interviewed (literally) hundreds of TV people over the course of his career. He is a past member of the Television Critics Association.
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2 thoughts on “Link: CRTC quest for quality set to shake up Canadian production”

  1. Something that bothers me about Canadian TV is that though I’ve always been so keen on the idea of Canadian tv, there haven’t been a whole lot of must-see Canadian tv series for me. Of my top 100 tv shows of all time (a list I updated over the Xmas holidays), 24 Canadian shows made my list, almost a quarter. That’s not a bad number, considering that there’s so much more American shows that get made, but some of those 24 made the list probably in large part because of their Canadianness (in culture/setting). Also, of these 24, about 10.5 of them aired prior to 2000. Only 13.5 began airing after 2000 with 9 shows having aired in the last 5 years. 9 shows doesn’t seem that bad though considering. I’ve actually been fairly happy with the Cancon these past few years.

    #12 Road to Avonlea (1990-1996)
    #13 Orphan Black (2013-current)
    #19 North of 60 (1992-1997)
    #24 Vikings (2013-current)
    #27 Degrassi [includes Degrassi Junior High, Degrassi High and Degrassi: TNG] (1987-1989, 1989-1991,2001-current)
    #35 Reign (2013-current)
    #40 Instant Star (2004-2008)
    #51 Hard Rock Medical
    #56 Jozi H (2006-2007)
    #64 The Odyssey (1992-1994)
    #69 MVP (2008)
    #71 Emily of New Moon (1998-2000)
    #72 Wind at My Back (1996-2001)
    #77 Made in Canada (1998-2003)
    #78 Mohawk Girls (2014-?)
    #80 Continuum (2012-current)
    #82 Intelligence (2006-2007)
    #83 Neon Rider (1990-1995)
    #84 Arctic Air (2012-2014)
    #85 The Littlest Hobo (1979-1985)
    #86 Breaker High (1997-1998)
    #91 Northwood (1991-1994)
    #92 Wild Roses (2009)
    #95 Heartland (2007-current)

  2. This move will only hurt smaller Canadian productions and networks as they will not be able to get certified as Canadian content or wont have nearly as much content to acquire. That only leaves the big guys to produce content that can fill the required percentages. Big mistake in my opinion and I hope they realize how many small productions they will essentially kill off with these changes.

    It will push small producers away from broadcast television even more and and reduce the unique qualities these productions bring to broadcast. Your large productions will do what’s known to work, there will be less experimentation on many levels. While production quality may be high, engagement might not, TBD.

    Changes like these should help the little people too, not hinder them, force them to online distribution, or even put them out of work.
    Step in the wrong direction.

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