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Link: Interviews a-plenty on Orphan Black

From Eric Deggans of NPR:

Clone Drama ‘Orphan Black’ Returns As Complex And Complicated As Ever
For fans of BBC America’s majestically complicated drama Orphan Black, it might be the toughest task they face all year: Explaining to newbies what the heck is going on just before the new season starts on Saturday. (Spoiler Alert: several plot points from the new season are discussed below). Continue reading.

From Alan Sepinwall of Hitfix:

‘Orphan Black’ co-creator on season 3: ‘Our sisters are teamed up a little bit more’
In its second season, “Orphan Black” came perilously close to collapsing under the weight of its many interlocking conspiracies. The BBC America sci-fi drama still had Tatiana Maslany’s remarkable performance(s) as a series of clones on the run from their makers, and it had turned each clone into a fully-realized character, many of whom could potentially carry their own show without the others. But the mythology got so dense, and forced so many abrupt changes in loyalty among both the clones and their various enemies and allies, that at a certain point I resolved to just pay attention to the character work, the comedy, and the episode-by-episode thriller material and not focus much brainpower on trying to keep track of who’s in charge and what their agenda is. Continue reading.

From Maureen Ryan of Huffington Post:

‘Orphan Black’ Returns With Boy Clones And More Mysteries
We know Maslany will inhabit each clone identity so thoroughly that we’ll forget one woman is playing half the cast. We know each clone will have a male friend or lover — think Alison’s husband Donnie, Sarah’s hunky boyfriend Cal, Cosima’s science pal Scott — who will be simultaneously impressed and a little afraid of each woman’s boldness and bravery. One of the smallest but most welcome subtexts of this energetic BBC America show centers on the idea that men find the sisters, who stick by each other and fight hard for their autonomy, attractive as either friends or lovers. “Empowerment is sexy” isn’t the show’s tagline, but it could be. Continue reading.

From Amber Dowling of TV Junkies:

Tatiana Maslany: Tony, cages and Orphan Black season 3
To gather more Season 3 intel, The TV Junkies caught up with Ms. Clones herself, Tatiana Maslany. Here she talks about last season’s introduction of trans clone Tony, filming scenes in a box and Orphan Black‘s ongoing gender identity debates. Continue reading.

From Caroline Siede of AV Club:

Orphan Black’s third season almost devolves into chaos before finding its feet
Throughout its excellent second season, Orphan Black was always in danger of tossing one too many balls in the air. In addition to exploring female identity through five clones (Tatiana Maslany as Sarah Manning, Alison Hendrix, Cosima Niehaus, Rachel Duncan, and Helena), the ever-expanding show introduced multiple shadowy corporations, corrupt religious institutions, scientific mysteries, conspiracies-within-conspiracies, and uneasy alliances. The season finale added yet another factor: a line of male clones known as Project Castor who were developed for, and controlled by, the military. The third-season premiere struggles to keep all those elements in the air as it reintroduces major players and key plots, but once the show settles into familiar patterns, it’s as good as it’s ever been. Continue reading.

From John Doyle of The Globe & Mail:

Orphan Black veers from terrific to trite and back
It’s back – the phenomenon that is Tatiana Maslany marches back to amaze us, again.

Orphan Black (Saturday, CTV, Space, MTV Canada, 9 p.m.) starts its third season with an idyllic scene. Maslany, as several of the show’s clones, and other characters are in a pleasant outdoor party situation. The music on the soundtrack is a version of the Beach Boys’ Wouldn’t It Be Nice. “Maybe if we think and wish and hope and pray it might come true …” Continue reading.

From Dalton Ross of Entertainment Weekly:

Orphan Black creator promises ‘bold moves’ in season 3
Orphan Black will be doubling down—pun intended—when season 3 kicks off this Saturday with the addition of a whole new batch of male clones (played by Ari Millen). Who are they? What do they want? And how will they affect the female clones we know and love, played by Tatiana Maslany? We traveled north of the border to the Orphan Blackset to put co-creator Graeme Manson in the hot seat. (Actually, it was pretty damn cold up there.) Here’s what he told us. Continue reading.

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Diane Wild

Diane is the founder of TV, eh? She loves books, movies, TV, science, space, traveling, theatre, art, cats, and drinking multiple beverages at the same time.
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4 thoughts on “Link: Interviews a-plenty on Orphan Black”

  1. I listened to an interview today that Tatiana gave on EW Sirius Radio this morning but for the most part I’m staying away from reading the various articles and listening to news on Orphan Black’s upcoming season. I want to be surprised. Orphan Black is my second favourite show on tv (after Downton Abbey) and I’m really excited for its return.

  2. I listened to an interview today that Tatiana gave on EW Sirius Radio this morning but for the most part I’m staying away from reading the various articles and listening to news on Orphan Black’s upcoming season. I want to be surprised. Orphan Black is my second favourite show on tv (after Downton Abbey) and I’m really excited for its return. Three questions I have that hopefully will get answered in the next season: 1) What is Mrs. S’s backstory? 2) Why was Felix adopted along with Sarah–does his origins figure into this whole clones scheme? 3) What is up with Cal–what secret does he have?

    1. Last year Maria Doyle Kennedy told AfterBuzzTV Mrs. S was used to looking after more then one kid at a time. When she was told to run with Sarah, Felix was also there so he went along for the ride. That may be all their is to Felix being dragged into things.

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