Link: CBC hired external investigator to probe nepotism complaints after executives’ spouses awarded contracts

From Sean Craig of the National Post:

Link: CBC hired external investigator to probe nepotism complaints after executives’ spouses awarded contracts
The CBC hired an external investigator to probe two top television executives after receiving complaints that at least 13 contracts were handed to production companies owned by their spouses. Although the investigator found no breaches of the public broadcaster’s conflict of interest policy, the legal counsel for one anonymous complainant said the findings are “inconsistent with the facts” and the contracts present the appearance of conflict of interest. Continue reading.

Greg David
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Greg David

Prior to becoming a television critic and owner of TV, Eh?, Greg David was a critic for TV Guide Canada, the country's most trusted source for TV news. He has interviewed television actors, actresses and behind-the-scenes folks from hundreds of television series from Canada, the U.S. and internationally. He is a podcaster, public speaker, weekly radio guest and educator, and past member of the Television Critics Association.
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4 thoughts on “Link: CBC hired external investigator to probe nepotism complaints after executives’ spouses awarded contracts”

  1. “Is said to.”

    Who is source saying what’s in the 2015 review? Not identified. Always a signal to be skeptical.

    Howard Levitt, lawyer/NatPo columnist and his client producer-complainant haven’t had review for 2 years? They don’t know all about what’s in it? Think reporter Sean Craig doesn’t have access to them, and the report itself?

    NatPo used Access to Info to get docs on project approvals, not the review itself, cuz they’ve had that access for two years.

    Sourceless “is said to” phrase is used to pretend arms-length reporting that’s not arms-length.

    Don’t report on the full, inconvenient context of the review directly. Instead get lawyer/columnist and/or his client for the “is said to,” who of course won’t mention the full context in a review that didn’t go their way two years ago.

    Don’t say who the source is. Just go with “is said to.” That way readers can’t judge credibility of source. Keep it vague it sounds unbiased.

    Classic mendacity, works very well. Generates reflexive comments from CBC haters not inclined to read with care, smear job done. Two year old news, those bros still mad.

    At the same time, incredibly lax by Catto, Platt and Stewart.

  2. Much of this comes from a very disgruntled employee who used to work at CBC — let go by a strong woman — and now works at Bell. Talk about drama! He has been on the warpath for quite sometime.

    Howard Levitt writes for the National Post — I wonder why he didn’t write a column two years ago? That seems to be when the story might have had more punch. For some reason they decided not to publish it.

    Interestingly — the journalist, Sean Craig, no longer works at the Post anymore.

  3. I know the “disgruntled employee” . He was let go at CBC and picked up pretty quickly thereafter at Bell. What’s not that well known is that his partner — also worked at the CBC at the same time.

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