Everything about Cardinal, eh?

Gunslingers kits out the cops (and killers) in Canadian TV

Seth Rossman’s IMDB page lists high-profile television projects like Slasher, Man Seeking Woman and Republic of Doyle, but it takes a keen eye to spot his work. If he does things right, you never see him at all. That’s because Rossman and his staff at Gunslingers supply the firearms, police and military wardrobe and vehicles, and fabricate items to be used by the men and ladies in the cast.

But Rossman (on the right in the top photo) didn’t start out in the industry working with real and fake firearms. After a gig in web development, he switched over to a career in make-up artistry, then as a private makeup artist to Seth Green, Eva Longoria, Cary Elwes, Kim Coates and more before a horrible accident sent him on this path.

Tell me about the accident that lead to you beginning Gunslingers.
Seth Rossman: I was down in the Dominican Republic working with Eva Longoria and I was struck down by a drunk driver. I was headed back to base camp and riding quads because we were working in the jungle. I was sitting at a red light and then advanced into the intersection and a local on a motorcycle took me out. He shattered my right leg from hip to ankle and it was a couple of days before they were able to get me out of the country. A couple of surgeries and a year and a half later I was walking. I was going through the surgeries and the rehab and was being told by the doctors that I needed to be realistic. They originally told me I might lose the leg. Then it was I’d keep the leg but it would never work. Then it was that the leg would work, but never properly. Then they said it would work properly, but I’d never get 15 hours a day on it. They were right about that.

As a makeup artist, the ability for me to chase an actor around a film set for 14 a day was gone. I was sitting on my couch trying to figure out what to do. I had a friend in the industry that was an armourer and I had been on set with him—we were both working on the same project—and he’d been asking if anyone could help him because he was short-staffed. I had wrapped my work and was just hanging out. He needed someone with a firearms license to help him and I did. I helped him through the night and at the end of it he handed me an envelope with cash in it. Fast-forward a year and a half and I realized maybe there was something to that. I looked at the industry and started asking around and was told there was room for another armaments company because everyone was using the same houses.


What were some challenges you faced?
We had to obtain all of the licenses, so there were a lot of hoops to jump through with the government to get those. That took a little over a year. Once that was done, we were sitting with an empty warehouse. We needed to figure out what to house to be able to service the industry. We did market research and figured out what the most popular firearms are and went to the Internet Movie Firearms Database. Then we went out and invested in the firearms and then modified them for film and TV. Then we needed to train everyone on how to work with them, take them to set, service them on set and send them out.

Then people started to ask about police belts, police uniforms. To do a scene with a police officer you need a gun, a uniform and a car. We had to expand to cover all of that. We have a vast firearms collection, a huge wardrobe selection, a massive props selection, all revolving around law enforcement, military and tactical stuff.

When you’re on-set, you need to educate these folks.
When we get to set, we introduce ourselves to the powers-that-be and check in. We explain we’re the armourer for the day and, if possible, can speak to the actor or actress for half an hour so that you get the performance you want. We meet whoever that is and go over the safety and protocol procedures. That always leads into education with regard to how they’re holding the gun and then they start picking our brain.

Let’s talk about specific projects; what did you do for the folks at Slasher?
Slasher brought us in to handle their armaments solution, so we came in to work with Dean McDermott for the pistol work on the show and provided all the firearms. We provided the gunfire effects on the show and all of the weapons that you see. You’ll see a scene involving cinderblocks and we made those, there’s a scene with a baseball bat and we made that; we manufactured all of those in-house.

What are the cinderblocks made out of?
Foam. We have moulds and produced them.

How has HDTV presented a challenge when it comes to making something look realistic?
When it comes to making props, what we make is really high-end. The cost isn’t cheap, but you’re paying for a prop that can be put two feet in front of a camera and you can’t tell the difference.

What other projects have you got on the go?
We just provided the wardrobe solution for Wolf Cop 2 and the entire law enforcement solution for CTV’s Cardinal.


Link: Revenant actor hospitalized after gun scene goes seriously wrong on Sudbury set of CTV miniseries

From Ben Leeson of Postmedia Network:

Revenant actor hospitalized after gun scene goes seriously wrong on Sudbury set of CTV miniseries
An actor was hospitalized after an incident involving a firearm on a TV set in Sudbury this past weekend, an Ontario Ministry of Labour spokeswoman has confirmed.

The actor, reportedly 34-year-old Brendan Fletcher from Comox Valley, B.C., was hurt while filming Cardinal, a CTV crime drama, during a scene where he was to take a discharge from a firearm into his mouth, according to a report received by the ministry, which is investigating the incident. Continue reading. 


TV, eh? podcast episode 200 – The Bicentennial Ides of Mayday

To celebrate Episode 200 of the TV, Eh? podcast, you get a twofer: our newsy chat about the latest goings-on in the industry followed immediately by Anthony’s chat with Mayday narrator Stephen Bogaert!

Diane, Anthony and Greg highlight the next two weeks in Canadian TV programming, Motive‘s final season return date next month and how cameras have started to roll on CTV’s production of Cardinal, the six-part series based on Giles Blunt’s novels.

Want to contribute to the discussion? Post links and discussion topics on our Reddit page.

Listen or download below, or subscribe via iTunes or any other podcast catcher with the TV, eh? podcast feed.


CTV and Super Écran Light up the North as Production Begins in Sudbury, Ont. on the New Serialized Drama CARDINAL

From a media release:

CTV and Super Écran, alongside producers Sienna Films and Entertainment One (eOne), announced today that production has begun on CARDINAL, the networks new serialized, six-part, one-hour drama featuring Golden Globe® nominee Billy Campbell (THE KILLING) and the multiple Genie Award-winning actress Karine Vanasse (REVENGE) as series leads. Directed by the award-winning Montréal native Daniel Grou aka Podz (19-2, MINUIT LE SOIR) the cinematic murder mystery begins shooting in Sudbury, Ont., today. The series will also shoot in North Bay, Ont., Atikameksheng Anishnawbek in northern Ontario, and Toronto. CARDINAL is a gripping, character driven drama set to premiere as part of CTV and Super Écran’s 2016/17 schedule.

Also announced today are additional cast members including Deborah Hay (The Anniversary) as Catherine CardinalJohn Cardinal’s wife; Alanna Bale (PRIME RADICALS) as Kelly Cardinal, Cardinal’s precocious and independent teenage daughter; Glen Gould (Rhymes for Young Ghouls) as Jerry Commanda, a police contemporary and friend of Cardinal; David Richmond Peck (ORPHAN BLACK) as Corporal Musgrave, an officer in charge of a tightly guarded investigation; Gail Maurice (STREET TIME) as Dorothy Pine, mother of young murder victim Katie PineKristen Thomson (Away from Her) as Sergeant Noelle Dyson, Cardinal’s commanding officer; and Brendan Fletcher (The Revenant) and Allie MacDonald (YOUNG DRUNK PUNK) as Eric Fraser  and Edie Soames, a young couple.

CARDINAL is adapted from the award-winning novel Forty Words for Sorrow, the first of the John Cardinal Mysteries series, a series of six bestselling crime novels written by Ontario native and award-winning author Giles Blunt. The series begins with the discovery of Katie Pine, a missing 13-year-old whose body is discovered in the shaft-head of an abandoned mine. CARDINAL follows detectives John Cardinal (Campbell) and Lise Delorme (Vanasse) as they attempt to uncover the mystery of what happened to the young girl. But as the case grows in scope and horror, a dark secret from Cardinal’s history threatens to derail the investigation.

CARDINAL is produced by Sienna Films and eOne in association with Bell Media’s CTV, with the financial participation of the Northern Ontario Heritage Fund Corporation, the Canada Media Fund and the Cogeco Program Development Fund, and with the assistance of the Ontario Film and Television Tax Credit and the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit. Super Écran has commissioned the series for French-language Canadian broadcast. eOne will distribute the series worldwide.


TV, eh? podcast episode 194 – Fighting My Cats for the Friskies

Diane, Anthony and Greg look at the results of our year-end Favourite Canadian TV Shows of 2015 poll so far (cast your votes here), followed by a look at some of the shows ending their seasons and series in December.

After a side-conversation about our favourite holiday TV shows and films, we get back on track and cover the casting news surrounding Cardinal, some cool guest casting in Season 2 of Schitt’s Creek and co-production Houdini & Doyle filming their final two Season 1 episodes in Southern Ontario.

Want to contribute to the discussion? Post links and discussion topics on our Reddit page.

Listen or download below, or subscribe via iTunes or any other podcast catcher with the TV, eh? podcast feed.