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2006-2013

Thanks to all the winners, bidders, donors, and those who helped spread the word about the TV, eh? auction in support of Kids Help Phone. It was a much smaller auction than last time but we still raised $1770 for the charity.

But some of the reasons I took so long to mount the auction and why I wanted to keep it small are the same reasons I’ve decided to put TV, eh? on hiatus. There’s nothing wrong, just shifting priorities and wanting to move on from this commitment. I’ll continue to write about television and other topics on other sites as it moves me, and cheerlead Canadian TV from further on the sidelines. I won’t pull the site down — it will remain up as a resource and on the off-chance I or someone else decides to revive it in the future.

I’ll wrap things up by the end of the year, do a couple more podcasts with my fabulous co-host Anthony Marco, and then move on to other web adventures. It’s been a wonderful ride, these past seven years. I’m grateful to everyone for the support and will always feel like I was part of a great community of people — and hope to remain so to a lesser degree. But it’s time to retire at least for the foreseeable future from running the site.

Thanks again to everyone for the support.




CITF-LogoThe Canadian International Television Festival debuts on November 15, 2013.  Perhaps TV, eh? readers forgot it existed.  Diane Wild – whose site I infrequently publish articles to – forgot it existed until I mentioned the CITF to her earlier this month.  CITF promotion will hit full force in the next few days, but then, it has to – there’s a press conference scheduled for November 5, after all.  As of the date I finish this article (November 3, 2013), the CITF confirms three things about itself – it’s real, there’s a Murdoch Mysteries-related event, and it promotes the #EyeOnCanada initiative.  Quite a feat, for a public festival that debuts in less than two weeks.

While I don’t know the CITF’s behind-the-scenes happenings, the festival cuts things close with its launch.  The CITF’s first Twitter posts were made on October 24, 2013.  The Canada Media Fund website has dates and times for certain parts of the festival, and the CITF’s first day is set aside for industry.  Murdoch Mysteries is the subject of the first announced screening and Q&A session.

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From Cassandra Szklarski of the Canadian Press:

Podeswa complains Canuck TV lacks vision
Canadian television lacks vision and courage, and that’s the reason it’s failing to keep up with the so-called Golden Age south of the border, says TV director Jeremy Podeswa. Continue reading.




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The CRTC is hosting a conversation on the future of TV in Canada and they’re asking for our help. That’s right, the Canadian TV industry is talking to the Canadian audience about something we have a hope of caring about. I’ll give you a moment to recover from your swoon. Whether they take action remains to be seen, of course, but they are listening so … baby steps. Also let’s keep in mind they’ll get flooded with contradictory opinions so taking action doesn’t mean our opinions will all translate into reality.

They’re asking three questions and want us to think creatively, speak openly, and be frank:

  1. What do you think about what’s on television?
  2. What do you think about how you receive television programming?
  3. Do you have enough information to make informed choices and seek solutions if you’re not satisfied?

You can participate in the conversation with the CRTC directly via their discussion forum, email, online form, phone, fax, mail or smoke signals. (One of those options may not actually be offered).

Or join TV, eh?’s discussion – call it a virtual flash conference — and I will report back to the CRTC in their post-conference report format. There are three ways you can join us:

  1. Let me know if you’d like to join the podcast Monday at 7pm PT/10pm ET via Google Hangout (for this live discussion I’m looking for people who do NOT make a living from the Canadian TV industry — let’s try to draw out and not drown out the audience opinion)
  2. Send me an audio file of your thoughts on one or more of the above questions that we can play during the podcast (audience and TV industry people welcome)
  3. Leave your non-anonymous comments on this post and I’ll read relevant excerpts on the podcast (audience and TV industry people welcome)




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From the CBC:

Where are the Canadian TV shows in this golden age?
In this so-called golden age of television, Canadians are often seen as minor players. Many ask where’s our Breaking Bad or Downton Abbey? Today, we’ve got the debate over the vision in Canadian television. Listen here.



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