Everything about Orphan Black, eh?

Link: Tatiana Maslany is Exhibit A in the case against CRTC’s new content rules

From Kate Taylor of The Globe and Mail:

Link: Tatiana Maslany is Exhibit A in the case against CRTC’s new content rules
If Orphan Black had been launched under this new rule, chances are that the promising young Canadian would not have been cast; the producers would have figured that a recognizable American actor would help sell their show abroad or the networks would have figured that an American would help sell it to audiences. Yet another Hollywood star would have shone more or less brightly in the firmament and one Canadian career might never have been launched. Continue reading.

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Link: Canada’s Tatiana Maslany wins big at Emmys

From Bill Harris of Postmedia Network:

Link: Canada’s Tatiana Maslany wins big at Emmys
Tatiana Maslany no longer is an Emmy orphan.

In her acceptance speech after winning an Emmy Award, Canada’s Maslany said, “I feel so lucky to be on a show that puts women at the centre.”

Orphan Black sure does that. And Maslany plays just about all of them. Continue reading.

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Link: Orphan Black actor Kevin Hanchard leads discussion on race and religion at UWindsor

From Tom Morrison of OurWindsor:

Link: Orphan Black actor Kevin Hanchard leads discussion on race and religion at UWindsor
Orphan Black actor Kevin Hanchard says he tries to advocate for his race in every role he takes.

The Mississauga-based actor returned to the University of Windsor, his alma mater, Tuesday afternoon to lead a discussion about race and religion in the performing arts as part of the school’s Humanities Week.

Hanchard, who portrays Detective Art Bell on the sci-fi clone series, said the race of his characters is always at the “forefront” of his mind. Continue reading.

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Kids Help Phone Auction: Orphan Black set visit

Sarah (TATIANA MASLANY) and Krystal (TATIANA MASLANY)

Orphan Black set visit: Visit the Orphan Black set during the fifth and final season. Prize must be used before the end of December 2016. Winner is responsible for transportation and/or accommodation in the Toronto area. Donated by Temple Street Productions.

Orphan Black set visit

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Orphan Black set visit: Visit the Orphan Black set during the fifth and final season. Prize must be used before the end of December 2016. Winner is responsible for transportation and/or accommodation in the Toronto area. Donated by Temple Street Productions.

Going for C$676.00

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Reaction to CRTC’s Policy framework for Certified Independent Production Funds

By Anonymous 

UPDATE: If the intent is to attract “top talent” that will make all these new “American” Canadian shows more viable, the CRTC should probably know that even some of the most successful Canadians in L.A., like the showrunner/creator of Bones, isn’t impressed.

Hanson1

Hart2


Canadian Television is about to become slightly less full of Canadians, thanks to a major CRTC decision released quietly yesterday.

The CRTC is allowing the independent production funds (including the Shaw Rocket Fund, Rogers Fund, Cogeco Program Development Fund, Telefilm Canada, and the Harold Greenberg Fund) to reduce their “point system” for what determines Canadian-ness of a project from 8 to 6. The general effect of this will be to allow for the hiring of non-Canadians in key creation and starring roles (ie: Americans will be able to create and star in “Canadian” TV series).

This, in fact, by the CRTC’s own admission, was one of the points of the decision:

“The current criterion requiring eight out of 10 Canadian content certification points to qualify for CIPF funding is restrictive and excludes many productions that could otherwise be of high quality and qualify as Canadian. Moreover, a reduced requirement could help smaller and perhaps more innovative projects to qualify for funding. A reduced requirement of at least six points could also facilitate the hiring by production companies of non-Canadian actors or creators, who may increase a project’s attractiveness and visibility in international markets.”

Reaction from the Canadian creative community was swift, and critical.

Ellis

Zmak

McGrath

Senecal

Andras

What’s particularly unusual about this decision is that something with far-reaching implications was done as a “paper hearing,” ie: the CRTC did not hold any public consultations.

The last time something like this was proposed, the Writers Guild of Canada brought a group of screenwriters to Hull to appear before the commission. They made a convincing case as to why this “flexibility” wouldn’t lead to better quality Canadian programming. It seems that current chairman J.P. Blais was determined to not repeat this exercise.

Of concern to fans of actual Canadian TV shows, of course, is the fact that once again in no way was the audience consulted. The CRTC didn’t bother to seek out or try to understand the feelings of fans who celebrate unique Canadian points-of-view and creative directions on display in Canadian-created shows such as Orphan Black, Flashpoint, X Company, Letterkenny, Wynonna Earp, Lost Girl, Rookie Blue, Saving Hope, Motive, or many more.

As Peter Mitchell, executive producer and showrunner of Murdoch Mysteries explained on Facebook, even the premise of the CRTC’s decision is faulty:

Mitchell

The problem with the CRTC’s decision is that it really doesn’t advance any new idea. Many Canadian producers have been doing their level best to copy “American-style” shows for years, watering down the Canadian creative role as much as possible. They never seem to do as well as the original work such as Orphan Black or Murdoch Mysteries. That’s why you’re not seeing Season 4 of the forgettable XIII, and why Houdini & Doyle, which debuted to so much fanfare, died a quiet death.

The idea that Canadian producers will be able to attract top American talent is dubious at best. Because if you’re American, and you’re working in the American industry where there’s more money, and more prestige, why would you take a massive pay cut to work in Canada? Instead of top American talent, you’re likelier to get the people who can’t get hired anymore, who might have had credits in the 1980s or 1990s. And now the CRTC has blessed the idea that these marginal players are more valuable than the top homegrown talent who are responsible for the industry’s top successes.

Senecal2

Filia

There are other ways to approach the idea of creating hits, rather than this failed road. But the CRTC seems to be enamored with the fantasy that “flexibility” fixes all, rather than actually supporting talent.

WGC

And the best part? A government that ran at least partially on a platform of promoting culture is signalling to the next generation of storytellers not to bother—that it’s time to leave:

Morrison

Natty

So there’s nothing good here if you’re a Canadian writer or actor hoping to star in or create a Canadian show. Or if you’re someone who likes the unique point of view you see from Canadian TV shows. But the producer’s association loves it. I’m sure you’ll be getting something great from that writer who did one episode of Simon & Simon any day now.

McGrath2

Zmak2

Zmak3

Senacal4

Great news, isn’t it?

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