Everything about The Nature of Things, eh?

Link: Cracking Cancer: Must-See TV

From James Bawden:

Link: Cracking Cancer: Must-See TV
The future of Canadian TV is bright –I make this statement after watching the brilliant new homegrown documentary Cracking Cancer which premieres on CBC-TV’s Nature Of Things Thursday night at 8 on CBC TV.

The subject is daunting enough –the advent of POG or Personalized OncoGenomics but this new technique in battling cancer is personalized by the true tales of patients. Continue reading. 

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The Nature of Things decodes the fascinating world of body language

I know body language can give you away. The way someone sits, leans, turns their head or fidgets can betray what one really thinks despite what words are said. If a picture can say 1,000 words, what can body language tell you? A heck of a lot more than I first assumed.

That’s what I came away with after watching a screener for “Body Language Decoded.” Broadcast as part of this Thursday’s The Nature of Things, written and directed by Geoff D’Eon and created and produced by Edward Peill, “Body Language Decoded” is a fascinating peek into how our bodies communicate in the most subtle of ways.

The instalment begins with the face and 43 muscles capable of creating thousands of intricate expressions that are hardwired into the brain. Why? Facial expressions were the key component to communication between early humans. Those automatic reactions have served FBI agent Joe Navarro well; he spent 25 years reading body language for the Bureau, earning the nickname “The Spy Catcher.” And while Navarro did read faces in order to gauge what was really going on with someone, he found an unlikely source for reading body language: the feet. Part of the limbic system, our feet and bodies tell the true tale of how we’re reacting to the world and each other.

Knowledge of the limbic system comes into play for Dr. Jillian Glass, who heads to the Santa Monica Pier to do one of my favourite pastimes: people watching. It’s there she can see how a young woman’s body shows her devotion to a man, and how his posture betrays his aloofness. Toes turned towards your mate? There’s a good chance the relationship is solid.

One of the most interesting segments of “Body Language Decoded” spends time covering the art of deception and the physical signs we give off when trying to lie. Footage of former U.S. president Bill Clinton is shown denying relations with Monica Lewinsky, and Nova Scotia mother Penny Boudreau who pleaded for the return of her missing daughter, Karissa. In the former case, lies were effectively told; in the latter, Boudreau was found guilty of murdering Karissa, showcasing how the body can hide or reveal a lie.

The Nature of Things airs Thursdays at 8 p.m. on CBC.

Image courtesy of Tell Tale Productions.

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Link: Showcasing The Bugs In Your Home!

From Jim Bawden:

Link: Showcasing The Bugs In Your Home!
Usually on The Nature Of Things TV fans get to visit tropical rain forests or the frozen Canadian North or laboratories in Oxford University.But director Roberto Verdecchia had this great idea — he wanted nothing better than to visit an average Toronto home and report from there.

But director Roberto Verdecchia had this great idea — he wanted nothing better than to visit an average Toronto home and report from there.

You can see for yourself on the absolutely original hour The Great Wild Outdoors which premieres on CBC-TV Thursday, February 9 at 8 p.m. Continue reading.

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Link: Good News: Jennifer Gardy Is Back On Nature Of Things

From Jim Bawden:

Link: Good News: Jennifer Gardy Is Back On Nature Of Things
Big news of the TV week is the return of Jennifer Gardy to CBC-TV’s The Nature Of Things with the fifth of her popular Myth Or Science specials.”The first four were all big ratings hits,” reports Dr. Gardy “but I never guessed when we started we’d be doing a fifth installment.”

“The first four were all big ratings hits,” reports Dr. Gardy “but I never guessed when we started we’d be doing a fifth installment.”

Check it out on CBC-TV Thursday at 8. Got that? Continue reading. 

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Myth or Science: The Secrets of our Senses comes to The Nature of Things

From a media release:

DR JENNIFER GARDY’S BACK WITH MYTH OR SCIENCE: THE SECRETS OF OUR SENSES ON CBC’S THE NATURE OF THINGS, THURSDAY, JANUARY 26 AT 8PM

Dr. Jennifer Gardy, the intrepid science sleuth, returns to CBC’s The Nature of Things with the fifth in the very popular Myth or Science series. Once again she tackles the health and science claims we all wonder about, to discover whether they’re science fact or science fiction.

In this episode Gardy heads out on an international odyssey to meet an unusual group of scientists who are rewriting our understanding of how the senses really work. Although our senses are crucial to our survival, we actually know very little about them. But now there is a revolution going on. A new breed of scientists is conducting unique and sometimes bizarre experiments to trick our brain into revealing the secrets of our senses.

Does what you see affect what you feel?
Does the sound of a food change its taste?
Can we smell danger?

“This was an incredibly fun film to make,” says Gardy. “I love being the human guinea pig in our Myth or Science experiments and I was tremendously surprised to find out how easily our experimenters could fool me with some of the sensory tricks you’ll see in the show.”

MYTH OR SCIENCE: THE SECRETS OF OUR SENSES premieres on CBC’s The Nature of Things on Thursday, January 26 at 8PM (8:30PM NL).

To investigate the world of our senses, Dr. Gardy heads to the U.K to meet a magician who is also a professor of psychology at Goldsmiths University, London. Together they use the science of magic and illusion to discover whether seeing really is believing. At Oxford University, Gardy joins the neuroscientist who created the world famous potato chip test to find out if the sound of our food dictates how it tastes. Then, she travels to the University of Leeds to help create a fake lecture to uncover whether seeing images of creepy crawlies is actually enough to get us scratching.

Then there is Los Angeles, where things get really weird. Here, Gardy meets the head of UCLA’s Multisensory Perception Lab where she is tricked into adopting a rubber hand as her own, and is stabbed with a fork… all in the pursuit of understanding how our brain deals with competing information from our sense of sight and touch.

In Germany, Gardy explores whether humans, like members of the animal kingdom, can actually smell danger. At University Hospital in Aachen, she witnesses a fascinating experiment that delves deep into our brain to find out if our sense of smell can be triggered by subliminal scents created during an aggressive activity like boxing.

And of course, Gardy also tackles those questions we’ve all stayed up late wondering about, like: can we really get used to a bad smell? And, is colour just an illusion created by our brain?

“Our senses are truly remarkable,” says Gardy after embarking on this amazing mission to uncover how our senses function. “Deep inside our brain, the interconnections between each of our sensory inputs have a profound influence on how we experience the world. The work our featured scientists are doing is really helping us to explore this most human of frontiers.”

MYTH OR SCIENCE: THE SECRETS OF OUR SENSES premieres on CBC’s The Nature of Things on Thursday, January 26 at 8PM (8:30PM NL).

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