Everything about Wynonna Earp, eh?

Link: Wynonna Earp: Panel reflects on first season and tease what’s coming

From Mufsin Mahbub of Film-Book.com:

Link: Wynonna Earp: Panel reflects on first season and tease what’s coming 
Wynonna Earp makes its first trip to New York Comic Con after becoming a runaway success on Syfy. The cast and crew came together to share with fans the behind-the-scenes in making the television adaptation of the cult comic book series. Showrunner Emily Andras, comic book series creator Beau Smith, actress Melanie Scrofano, and actor Tim Rozon joined the panel to chat about Syfy’s new hit series and give a tease of what’s coming for season two. Continue reading. 


Link: Wynonna Earp’s Dominique Provost-Chalkley on her very different Murdoch Mysteries role

From Bridget Liszewski of The TV Junkies:

Link: Wynonna Earp’s Dominique Provost-Chalkley on her very different Murdoch Mysteries role
“We center around the Fire of Toronto in 1904 and open with a huge debutante ball. I’m one of the debutantes trying to win Mr. Rodney Strong’s hand in marriage. Of course it doesn’t run as smoothly as that and one of the debutantes is killed, so amongst all the drama Murdoch has to work out who is murdering them and why.” Continue reading.


Photo gallery: First look at Season 10 of Murdoch Mysteries

The wait is over, Murdoch Mysteries fans! Season 10 is upon us, and we couldn’t be happier, especially after getting a peek at six images from the first episode!

As previously announced, Downton Abbey‘s Samantha Bond guest-stars in “Great Balls of Fire, Part 1,” but what we don’t know was that Wynonna Earp‘s Dominique Provost-Chalkley would be appearing as well. Here’s an episode description for Episode 1001:

In the wake of Ogden’s (Hélène Joy) near-death experience at the hands of a deranged former patient, Murdoch (Yannick Bisson) is trying to create some normalcy in their shared life by moving ahead with plans to build a house. Ogden appears to be recovered but her physical well-being hides trauma to her spirit and psyche. The doctor masks it well as the couple spends a night on the town at the Grand Hotel for an elegant debutante ball. Ogden’s friend, Lady Suzanne Atherly (Samantha Bond), has recently arrived from London and is using the event to introduce her daughter Elizabeth (Dominique Provost-Chalkley) to Toronto society and the very eligible bachelor Rodney Strong (Kyle Cameron). As Ogden entertains her guest, Murdoch is assailed by George Crabtree’s (Jonny Harris) commentary on the young women vying for the affections of the wealthy suitor.


Season 10 of Murdoch Mysteries debuts Monday, Oct. 10, at 8 p.m. on CBC.


Writers Talking TV: Emily Andras, Wynonna Earp

The first Writers Talking TV of the autumn is coming up on Sept. 29, and we’re pleased to announce it features showrunner Emily Andras talking about her show, Wynonna Earp, with fellow screenwriter, host Nicole Demerse. The event includes an in-depth discussion about screenwriting, an episode screening, and an audience Q&A. WTTV is a great way to hear knowledgeable screenwriters talking about their craft, so don’t miss this opportunity. As always, WTTV is free and open to the public, but to make sure you get a seat, please RSVP as soon as possible.

When: Sept. 29, 7 p.m.
Where: TIFF Bell Lightbox, 350 King St. West, Toronto
RSVP: Holly LaFlamme h.laflamme@wgc.ca

The lowdown on Wynonna Earp: Demon outlaws? Magic guns? Spiked coffee? Just another day at the office for motorcycle riding, whisky-slinging, fast-talking heroine Wynonna Earp. After a troubled adolescence spent in and out of juvie, she’s returned to her hometown of Purgatory, hell bent on ending the family curse, which resurrects every one of the villains her legendary ancestor dispatched. Only Wynonna can send Wyatt’s kills back to hell before they escape from their earthly prison and wreak havoc on the entire world.  That is, if she can stay out of trouble…


Reaction to CRTC’s Policy framework for Certified Independent Production Funds

By Anonymous 

UPDATE: If the intent is to attract “top talent” that will make all these new “American” Canadian shows more viable, the CRTC should probably know that even some of the most successful Canadians in L.A., like the showrunner/creator of Bones, isn’t impressed.



Canadian Television is about to become slightly less full of Canadians, thanks to a major CRTC decision released quietly yesterday.

The CRTC is allowing the independent production funds (including the Shaw Rocket Fund, Rogers Fund, Cogeco Program Development Fund, Telefilm Canada, and the Harold Greenberg Fund) to reduce their “point system” for what determines Canadian-ness of a project from 8 to 6. The general effect of this will be to allow for the hiring of non-Canadians in key creation and starring roles (ie: Americans will be able to create and star in “Canadian” TV series).

This, in fact, by the CRTC’s own admission, was one of the points of the decision:

“The current criterion requiring eight out of 10 Canadian content certification points to qualify for CIPF funding is restrictive and excludes many productions that could otherwise be of high quality and qualify as Canadian. Moreover, a reduced requirement could help smaller and perhaps more innovative projects to qualify for funding. A reduced requirement of at least six points could also facilitate the hiring by production companies of non-Canadian actors or creators, who may increase a project’s attractiveness and visibility in international markets.”

Reaction from the Canadian creative community was swift, and critical.






What’s particularly unusual about this decision is that something with far-reaching implications was done as a “paper hearing,” ie: the CRTC did not hold any public consultations.

The last time something like this was proposed, the Writers Guild of Canada brought a group of screenwriters to Hull to appear before the commission. They made a convincing case as to why this “flexibility” wouldn’t lead to better quality Canadian programming. It seems that current chairman J.P. Blais was determined to not repeat this exercise.

Of concern to fans of actual Canadian TV shows, of course, is the fact that once again in no way was the audience consulted. The CRTC didn’t bother to seek out or try to understand the feelings of fans who celebrate unique Canadian points-of-view and creative directions on display in Canadian-created shows such as Orphan Black, Flashpoint, X Company, Letterkenny, Wynonna Earp, Lost Girl, Rookie Blue, Saving Hope, Motive, or many more.

As Peter Mitchell, executive producer and showrunner of Murdoch Mysteries explained on Facebook, even the premise of the CRTC’s decision is faulty:


The problem with the CRTC’s decision is that it really doesn’t advance any new idea. Many Canadian producers have been doing their level best to copy “American-style” shows for years, watering down the Canadian creative role as much as possible. They never seem to do as well as the original work such as Orphan Black or Murdoch Mysteries. That’s why you’re not seeing Season 4 of the forgettable XIII, and why Houdini & Doyle, which debuted to so much fanfare, died a quiet death.

The idea that Canadian producers will be able to attract top American talent is dubious at best. Because if you’re American, and you’re working in the American industry where there’s more money, and more prestige, why would you take a massive pay cut to work in Canada? Instead of top American talent, you’re likelier to get the people who can’t get hired anymore, who might have had credits in the 1980s or 1990s. And now the CRTC has blessed the idea that these marginal players are more valuable than the top homegrown talent who are responsible for the industry’s top successes.



There are other ways to approach the idea of creating hits, rather than this failed road. But the CRTC seems to be enamored with the fantasy that “flexibility” fixes all, rather than actually supporting talent.


And the best part? A government that ran at least partially on a platform of promoting culture is signalling to the next generation of storytellers not to bother—that it’s time to leave:



So there’s nothing good here if you’re a Canadian writer or actor hoping to star in or create a Canadian show. Or if you’re someone who likes the unique point of view you see from Canadian TV shows. But the producer’s association loves it. I’m sure you’ll be getting something great from that writer who did one episode of Simon & Simon any day now.





Great news, isn’t it?