Everything about X Company, eh?

Link: X Company creators on bringing their series to “a natural, full-circle conclusion”

From Bridget Liszewski of The TV Junkies:

Link: X Company creators on bringing their series to “a natural, full-circle conclusion”
“Our hope mainly was to inspire Canadians with a little curiosity about the secrets their country has kept, and with a little pride that we were an important part of the bigger picture. And to wonder what they would have done, if they had been that agent, or that German officer, or that team leader, or that wife…” Continue reading. 


Production begins on third — and final — season of CBC’s X Company

From a media release:

CBC and Temple Street today announced that production is underway on the third and final season (10×60) of the original drama series X COMPANY, set in the thrilling and dangerous world of World War II espionage. Although the war isn’t over, it’s definitely the end of an era as the first group of trained operatives from Camp X complete their final covert mission as a team in the concluding season, which will be broadcast on CBC in winter 2017.

Executive producer Stephanie Morgenstern will come full circle and make her television directorial debut with X COMPANY’s final two episodes of the final season, 15 years after directing the award-winning short that inspired the series.

The final season of X COMPANY will see the team of Camp X operatives press forward to the finish line of their final mission together, hoping to deliver a blow to the enemy that could change the course of the war. After the shocking and disillusioning losses of Tom and those who fell at Dieppe, it’s harder than ever to keep the faith. The rules of human decency are stretched to a point where the difference between good and evil becomes more difficult to discern. The team learns the tough lesson that to fight the enemy, you must become the enemy.

The series’ international ensemble cast returns, including Evelyne Brochu as Aurora, Jack Laskey as Alfred, Warren Brown as Neil, Connor Price as Harry, Hugh Dillon as Sinclair, Lara Jean Chorostecki as Krystina and Torben Liebrecht as Faber.

X COMPANY season 3 shoots on location in Budapest, Hungary until November 2016, and will be broadcast on CBC in winter 2017.

X COMPANY is a Canadian-Hungarian co-production, produced by Temple Street, a division of Boat Rocker Studios, co-produced by Pioneer Stillking Kft and commissioned by CBC. The series is created and written by multi award-winning Mark Ellis & Stephanie Morgenstern and is executive produced by Ellis & Morgenstern, Ivan Schneeberg, David Fortier, and Kerry Appleyard of Temple Street, and Bill Haber of Ostar Productions.


Reaction to CRTC’s Policy framework for Certified Independent Production Funds

By Anonymous 

UPDATE: If the intent is to attract “top talent” that will make all these new “American” Canadian shows more viable, the CRTC should probably know that even some of the most successful Canadians in L.A., like the showrunner/creator of Bones, isn’t impressed.



Canadian Television is about to become slightly less full of Canadians, thanks to a major CRTC decision released quietly yesterday.

The CRTC is allowing the independent production funds (including the Shaw Rocket Fund, Rogers Fund, Cogeco Program Development Fund, Telefilm Canada, and the Harold Greenberg Fund) to reduce their “point system” for what determines Canadian-ness of a project from 8 to 6. The general effect of this will be to allow for the hiring of non-Canadians in key creation and starring roles (ie: Americans will be able to create and star in “Canadian” TV series).

This, in fact, by the CRTC’s own admission, was one of the points of the decision:

“The current criterion requiring eight out of 10 Canadian content certification points to qualify for CIPF funding is restrictive and excludes many productions that could otherwise be of high quality and qualify as Canadian. Moreover, a reduced requirement could help smaller and perhaps more innovative projects to qualify for funding. A reduced requirement of at least six points could also facilitate the hiring by production companies of non-Canadian actors or creators, who may increase a project’s attractiveness and visibility in international markets.”

Reaction from the Canadian creative community was swift, and critical.






What’s particularly unusual about this decision is that something with far-reaching implications was done as a “paper hearing,” ie: the CRTC did not hold any public consultations.

The last time something like this was proposed, the Writers Guild of Canada brought a group of screenwriters to Hull to appear before the commission. They made a convincing case as to why this “flexibility” wouldn’t lead to better quality Canadian programming. It seems that current chairman J.P. Blais was determined to not repeat this exercise.

Of concern to fans of actual Canadian TV shows, of course, is the fact that once again in no way was the audience consulted. The CRTC didn’t bother to seek out or try to understand the feelings of fans who celebrate unique Canadian points-of-view and creative directions on display in Canadian-created shows such as Orphan Black, Flashpoint, X Company, Letterkenny, Wynonna Earp, Lost Girl, Rookie Blue, Saving Hope, Motive, or many more.

As Peter Mitchell, executive producer and showrunner of Murdoch Mysteries explained on Facebook, even the premise of the CRTC’s decision is faulty:


The problem with the CRTC’s decision is that it really doesn’t advance any new idea. Many Canadian producers have been doing their level best to copy “American-style” shows for years, watering down the Canadian creative role as much as possible. They never seem to do as well as the original work such as Orphan Black or Murdoch Mysteries. That’s why you’re not seeing Season 4 of the forgettable XIII, and why Houdini & Doyle, which debuted to so much fanfare, died a quiet death.

The idea that Canadian producers will be able to attract top American talent is dubious at best. Because if you’re American, and you’re working in the American industry where there’s more money, and more prestige, why would you take a massive pay cut to work in Canada? Instead of top American talent, you’re likelier to get the people who can’t get hired anymore, who might have had credits in the 1980s or 1990s. And now the CRTC has blessed the idea that these marginal players are more valuable than the top homegrown talent who are responsible for the industry’s top successes.



There are other ways to approach the idea of creating hits, rather than this failed road. But the CRTC seems to be enamored with the fantasy that “flexibility” fixes all, rather than actually supporting talent.


And the best part? A government that ran at least partially on a platform of promoting culture is signalling to the next generation of storytellers not to bother—that it’s time to leave:



So there’s nothing good here if you’re a Canadian writer or actor hoping to star in or create a Canadian show. Or if you’re someone who likes the unique point of view you see from Canadian TV shows. But the producer’s association loves it. I’m sure you’ll be getting something great from that writer who did one episode of Simon & Simon any day now.





Great news, isn’t it?


Comments and queries for the week of July 1

X Company‘s creators discuss the heartbreaking finale and look towards Season 3

As an American former combat photojournalist, I usually avoid various combat series. But this one is just riveting. It’s so well acted and emotionally layered that I find myself comparing it to Anthony Doerr’s brilliant WW2 bestseller All the Light We Cannot See. Both that book and this series capture a certain time beautifully and reminds us of the terrible consequences of war, on boh sides. Thank you for making great television. P.S.: Please don’t kill off Alfred, Aurora or Neil. For various reasons, they all need a break! —Karen

Bad moves and bad weather on The Amazing Race Canada

Best thing on Canadian TV and look forward to it every year. Canadian TV does not have the benefit of the the big networks but does a brilliant job with this show, keep it up. —Jean

Jennifer Valentyne exits Breakfast Television Toronto

I said I wouldn’t, and haven’t watched BT since Jennifer was let go and I now watch CP24. I can’t believe they let go the one person who went beyond and above. She tried everything and always pretended that she was extremely interested. Kevin is so annoying as he constantly cuts people off; I seriously don’t know how his co-workers don’t tell him to shut up and let me finish a sentence. Dina calls in sick more often than not. Bring Jennifer back and I will come back, as will I am sure a lot of other viewers. —Jacq


Got a question or comment about Canadian TV? Email greg@tv-eh.com or via Twitter @tv_eh.