Tag Archives: Canadian TV

What Netflix’s half a billion CAD investment in Canada is really about

From Corie Wright, Director, Global Public Policy of Netflix:

Last week, we received approval under the Investment Canada Act from the Minister of Canadian Heritage, the Hon. Melanie Joly, to create Netflix Canadaa new home for Netflix original productions in Canada. It’s our first permanent production presence outside of the U.S. Netflix will use Netflix Canada to work directly with Canadian producers, creators, talent and crews to create more great content.

As part of this approval, Netflix committed to invest at least half a billion CAD in movies and television shows produced in Canada, both in English and in French, over the next five years. This means certainty that Netflix will continue to play a large role in the Canadian production community. We have invested in Canada because Canadians make great global stories. That says more about the quality and strength of Canadian content, talent, and crew than a commitment of any dollar amount.

We have more work to do when it comes to finding great stories from Quebec told in French. That is why on top of the half a billion CAD investment, we made a commitment to invest CAD $25 million dollars in market development activities over five years. Netflix will use that additional investment to host pitch days, recruitment events, and support local cultural events to ensure Netflix Canada reaches vibrant Canadian production communities, including the French-language community in Quebec.

Setting the record straight

Since the announcement we’ve seen lots of excitement, questions, and even some conspiracy theories about our investment. We’d like to set the record straight:

  • The recent price increase has nothing to do with our investment or commitments. That price increase was planned a long time ago.
  • We have not made any deals about taxesOur investment was approved under the Investment Canada Act. No tax deals were part of the approval to launch our new Canadian presence.
  • Netflix follows tax laws everywhere we operate. Under Canadian law, foreign online services like Netflix aren’t required to collect and remit sales tax.

Netflix is an online service, not a broadcaster

Some say Netflix got special treatment because the government didn’t force us to meet special content quotas as part of our investment — that’s wrong. Netflix is an online service, not a broadcaster. No online media service — foreign or domestic — is subject to traditional broadcast media regulations like quotas or content levies; they’re also not eligible for the regulatory benefits that traditional media enjoy. The CRTC decided in 1999 (before Netflix even had a streaming service) that these regulations would not apply to internet-based media. We think that’s the right approach. Internet-native, on-demand services like Netflix are consumer-driven and operate on the open internet. We don’t use public property like broadcast spectrum or rights of way and we don’t receive the regulatory protections and benefits that broadcasters get (and, by the way, we’re not asking for them).

Canada’s exceptional, world-class stories and production community

People choose what they want to watch on our service so we have to invest in the best content from around the world. We didn’t invest in ANNEFrontierTravelers or Alias Grace to fill a quota, we invested because they are great global stories. We will continue to invest in great Canadian content, and in other productions made in Canada like Hemlock GroveA Series of Unfortunate Events, and Okja, that are not Canadian content but that make use of, and showcase to the world, Canada’s outstanding talent, facilities, resources and locations.

What’s next

We understand that people are curious and eager for immediate details about what comes next. But remember: our commitment marks a long term investment in Canada — not just a next week, next month, or next year investment. That means that now that we’ve been given the green light to establish a local production presence, we have some planning and hard work to do before we can make any additional official announcements.

There is more to come. Stay tuned….

– Corie Wright, Director, Global Public Policy

 

 

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Poll: Which returning Canadian TV series are you excited to watch this fall?

Can you believe it? It’s already August, which means the Canadian fall television season is a mere few weeks away. We here at TV, Eh? are as excited as you, with all of our returning favourites hitting the small screen between now and the end of November.

So, to have a little fun—and celebrate the coming season—we’ve put together a poll where you pick the three returning Canadian-made shows you’re most looking forward to seeing this fall. Wondering exactly when those projects will be back? Check out our handy calendars and mark yours! The poll closes next Friday, so have fun!

Related: Which shows have been renewed, cancelled or we’re still waiting to hear about? We’ve got the details.

 

 

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Your favourite Canadian TV series of all time

Back in April, we asked you to help celebrate Canada’s 150th year as a country. The question: what are your favourite Canadian television series of all time? Thanks to everyone who took the time to send their list of faves and the memories they have of those programs as well.

Here’s a sample of some of the feedback we got. Feel free to add your own thoughts and favourites in the comments section below.

Seeing Things, Traders and Cold Case. —Christian

1. Slings and Arrows
2. Corner Gas
3. Rookie Blue
That was my Top 3, but I also liked a lot: Due South, The Collector, Rent-A-Goalie, Almost Heroes, Seed, Being Erica, MVP, Wild Roses, Cra$h & Burn, The Guard, Flashpoint, ReGenesis, Lost Girl, Sanctuary, Continuum and Dark Matter. —Roger

1. Da Vinci’s Inquest
2. The Red Green Show
3. Due South
4. Corner Gas
5. Pure
Mark

Nicholas Campbell starred in ‘Da Vinci’s Inquest’

I have listed my favourite Canadian TV shows through the years. I believe the are all Canadian. If not, please let me know. Some go way back. Some are current.
The Friendly Giant
Uncle Bobby
What’s for Dinner
Bizarre
Rookie Blue
Red Green Show
Murdoch Mysteries
Cityline
This Hour has 22 Minutes
Rick Mercer Report
Joyce

Quentin Durgens, MP and SCTV. —Steve

The Beachcombers
The Littlest Hobo
Seeing Things
SCTV
Da Vinci’s Inquest
19-2
Motive
Continuum
JeffDJ

Codco

There was a time when CBC had Kids in the Hall, Codco and Street Legal all on one night. That was a great night for Canadian TV. Two innovative and edgy comedies from different parts of Canada followed by a great slick sexy drama that got into some issues. (I did work on Kids as a graphic artist, but I’m speaking here as a viewer.) —Gary

Wynonna Earp: there are not enough superlatives to describe how much I love this show.
Lost Girl: my true introduction to how Canadians do genre TV and how special the Canadian are who make it.
(On behalf of my nephew, a pint-size shout out to his faves: Wild Kratts and Paw Patrol.) —Laura

The Red Green Show

Nice list. Here are a few of mine, mostly oldies.
The Trouble With Tracy
Red Green/Comedy Mill/Smith and Smith (basically any S&S production)
Party Game
You Can’t Do That On Television
The Dini Petty Show
The Pig and Whistle
Canadian Bandstand
The Elephant Show
A Gift to Last (Gordon Pinsent mini-series)
Definition/Beat The Clock (game shows count, right?)
Which reminds me of Front Page Challenge, and that other one that pitted two teams of high school students against each other. The name escapes me. I could go on but I’ll stop here. Oh! I just have to add Saturday Night at the Movies with Elwy Yost. Really miss him. —Chris

I have many shows that I like and out of all of them, I’ll highlight two that I regard as ground-breaking. After years of American programs with courtroom settings: Street Legal was the first to show how the Canadian system worked. Within the personal lives of the characters, it dealt with issues of feminism, mixed-race relationships, and schizophrenia, just to name a few. For a more recent show, it has to be X Company. I can’t name a series that had me living from one week to the next with such anticipation. We learned something about our history that had been mostly ignored. In this age of social media, we were able to connect with other viewers from around the world as well as the actors and creative minds involved. —Mel

Billable Hours

My Top 3 are Slings and Arrows, SCTV and the 80s era Anne of Green Gables. More recent … I still miss the weirdness of Call Me Fitz and want to know what happened to Jimmy Reardon on Intelligence. —Diane

1. SCTV
2. Kids in the Hall
3. Trailer Park Boys
4. Corner Gas
5. Kenny vs. Spenny
6. Wok With Yan!
7. Letterkenny
8. Schitt’s Creek
Todd

I’m not going to rank them but off the top of my head, I’ll say these are my favourite Canadian shows.
Reboot
The Raccoons
Continuum
Billable Hours (I still quote this show all the time, underappreciated and hilarious)
The Stargate TV shows (frequently campy as hell but still enjoyable)
19-2
Speaker’s Corner
Flashpoint
jPod
You Can’t Do That On Television 
Brent

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Link: Pride Month: 10 shows that prove Canadian TV does representation right

From Victoria Nelli of The TV Junkies:

Link: Pride Month: 10 shows that prove Canadian TV does representation right
The Canadian TV industry boasts shows that not only featured an LGBTQ character, but also provide them with a stellar platform to evoke change, make waves, and serve as a beacon of hope, and for that, we are extremely grateful! Continue reading.

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Link: Why aren’t we all fuming over the CRTC cuts? Because we don’t see ourselves reflected in TV and film

From Amanda Parris of CBC Arts:

Link: Why aren’t we all fuming over the CRTC cuts? Because we don’t see ourselves reflected in TV and film
The CRTC was renewing the five year licenses for the big three private broadcasters in Canada who deliver much of the television we all watch: Bell, Corus and Rogers. In the renewal, the CRTC announced that they would be decreasing the minimum financial contributions these broadcasters are required to allocate to Canadian content from 9-10 per cent to just 5 per cent. The Canadian content that is supported through these contributions (a.k.a Programs of National Interest, or PNI’s) includes drama, scripted series, documentaries and Canadian award shows.  Continue reading. 

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