Tag Archives: CanCon

Link: In the era of Netflix, what do we want Canadian Content to be?

From Callum Marsh of the National Post:

Link: In the era of Netflix, what do we want Canadian Content to be?
What these flustered complaints share is an uncertainty about the very nature of “Canadian Content.” The presumption that we have an accepted, universal definition of “content that reflects our identity and our history” – fostered by politicians eager to appear patriotic and protective of national interests – makes it difficult to determine realistically what we want from art and culture in Canada, and next to impossible to legislate the kind of policy that could make it happen. It’s easy to say that Joly’s plan doesn’t do enough. It’s harder to say what it ought to do better.  Continue reading.

 

 

 

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Link: Canada’s new cultural policy: The 10 key takeaways; plus Melanie Joly’s speech

From Daniel Leblanc and Mayaz Alam of The Globe and Mail:

Link: Canada’s new cultural policy: The 10 key takeaways
On Thursday, the Heritage Minister unveils ‘Creative Canada,’ the first major overhaul of the cultural funding regime in more than 25 years. Here’s what you need to know. Continue reading. 

Here’s a link to a transcript of today’s speech.

 

 

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Link: Netflix to commit $500M over 5 years on new Canadian productions: sources

From Catherine Cullen of CBC News:

Link: Netflix to commit $500M over 5 years on new Canadian productions: sources
Internet streaming service Netflix will spend at least half a billion dollars over the next five years to fund original Canadian productions, CBC News has learned.

The funding will officially be announced tomorrow by Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly as part of a speech unveiling her vision for Canadian content and cultural industries in the digital world. It comes after months of public consultations, which were held last year. Continue reading.

 

 

 

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Link: Cancon television regulations need updating in the age of streaming

From Kate Taylor of The Globe and Mail:

Link: Cancon television regulations need updating in the age of streaming
Shows such as the crime drama Cardinal, distinctively Canadian by virtue of its Northern Ontario setting and plot surrounding the disappearance of an Indigenous girl, would seem to be the sweet spot: It has sold into Britain and several European countries and is seen on Hulu in the United States. That’s great, but why should Canadians sacrifice the likes of Letterkenny just because foreigners may not get it? Continue reading.

 

 

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Link: Updating Cancon rules for Internet age comes with political baggage

From Kate Taylor of The Globe and Mail:

Link: Updating Cancon rules for Internet age comes with political baggage
Ever since the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission first decided to exempt “new media” from regulation back in 1999, federal jurisdiction over content delivered via the Internet has proved mainly theoretical. If Ottawa wanted to intervene to make Canadian programming more discoverable online, it would certainly help if the government asserted its role by updating the Broadcasting Act, last revised in 1991. And if the government wanted Internet service providers, who don’t compensate the content creators who help build their profits, to contribute to the system, it would definitely need a whole new law – because in 2012 the Supreme Court ruled that ISPs are not broadcasters. Continue reading. 

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