Tag Archives: Industry News

WGC asks government to reject CRTC decisions

From a media release:

The Writers Guild of Canada (WGC) has filed an appeal to Cabinet about the recent, potentially disastrous CRTC broadcasting decisions 2017-149 and 150. The decisions have created deep concern in the Canadian screenwriting community for good reason: they slash private broadcaster funding to Canadian programs by 40% and could lead to over $200 million in reduced broadcaster spending on Canadian shows over a five-year licence term.

“We appeal to Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly to reject these deeply flawed and harmful decisions which deal a massive blow to Canadian culture by drastically cutting Canadian-created production,” says WGC President Jill Golick. “Screen-entertainment is the most popular cultural medium of our time. Canadian screenwriters are committed to creating shows that connect our histories, share our values, enrich our social fabric and strengthen our country. But if these decisions stand, we will be forced to leave our country in search of employment elsewhere.”

This inevitable talent drain is because Canadian screenwriters occupy a unique position in the industry. They do not work on foreign or “service” productions —primarily U.S. shows shot in Canada, not created by Canadians — as do some industry professionals. Canadian screenwriters’ primary role is to create shows that are commissioned for Canada’s private broadcasters and CBC.

Consequently, the CRTC decisions endanger both Canadian storytelling and its storytellers. It’s a particularly short-sighted choice during Canada 150, a time when Canadians should be able to look to a future where Canada’s cultural output will expand, not shrink. Instead, the CRTC has facilitated the latter, by reducing Bell Media and Corus Entertainments’ minimum spending requirements on “programs of national interest,” (PNI) — drama, documentary, children’s programming etc. — to 5%. Status quo PNI spending levels are 8% and 9% of broadcasting revenues for Bell and Corus respectively, but in standardizing PNI at 5% former CRTC chair Jean-Pierre Blais chose to disregard the method used to calculate PNI contributions.“Blais ignored precedent and turned away from the existing methodology of calculating PNI,” says WGC Executive Director Maureen Parker. “Instead he

“Blais ignored precedent and turned away from the existing methodology of calculating PNI,” says WGC Executive Director Maureen Parker. “Instead he standardized PNI spending using the lowest common denominator. Where in Canada’s Broadcasting Act does it even imply that standardized contributions are a policy objective? Nowhere. What the Act does say is that the broadcasting system should contribute significantly to the creation of Canadian programming, and maximize Canadian creative resources. These CRTC decisions don’t fulfill either crucial cultural objective.”Heritage Minister Joly’s public, laudable intent has been to bring the best of Canada to the world. The WGC is in complete

Heritage Minister Joly’s public, laudable intent has been to bring the best of Canada to the world. The WGC is in complete agreement, and asks the Liberal government to ensure a place in the Canadian broadcasting system for our own culture: The world needs more, not less, Canada.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

Link: Why aren’t we all fuming over the CRTC cuts? Because we don’t see ourselves reflected in TV and film

From Amanda Parris of CBC Arts:

Link: Why aren’t we all fuming over the CRTC cuts? Because we don’t see ourselves reflected in TV and film
The CRTC was renewing the five year licenses for the big three private broadcasters in Canada who deliver much of the television we all watch: Bell, Corus and Rogers. In the renewal, the CRTC announced that they would be decreasing the minimum financial contributions these broadcasters are required to allocate to Canadian content from 9-10 per cent to just 5 per cent. The Canadian content that is supported through these contributions (a.k.a Programs of National Interest, or PNI’s) includes drama, scripted series, documentaries and Canadian award shows.  Continue reading. 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

Link: CBC hired external investigator to probe nepotism complaints after executives’ spouses awarded contracts

From Sean Craig of the National Post:

Link: CBC hired external investigator to probe nepotism complaints after executives’ spouses awarded contracts
The CBC hired an external investigator to probe two top television executives after receiving complaints that at least 13 contracts were handed to production companies owned by their spouses. Although the investigator found no breaches of the public broadcaster’s conflict of interest policy, the legal counsel for one anonymous complainant said the findings are “inconsistent with the facts” and the contracts present the appearance of conflict of interest. Continue reading.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

The Minister of Canadian Heritage announces the creation of an independent committee to recommend qualified candidates for the CBC/Radio-Canada Board of Directors

From a media release:

The Government of Canada is committed to open and transparent processes for selecting appointees, to help strengthen trust in Canada’s democracy and ensure the integrity of its public institutions. Today, the Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage, announced the creation of an advisory committee for appointments to the CBC/Radio-Canada Board of Directors.

This independent advisory committee will have a mandate to lead the selection process for the CBC/Radio-Canada Board of Directors. It will present its recommendations for qualified candidates to the Minister.

This independent, non-partisan committee is made up of experts in broadcasting and digital technology, and representatives of cultural sectors from across Canada. Indigenous Peoples, official-language communities and youth are also represented.

The committee will be chaired by Tom Clark from Ontario. Mr. Clark has worked in Canadian television news for the past 45 years.

The following people are also appointed to the committee:

  • Prem Gill (British Columbia) started her career in the television and broadcasting industry. She has more than 20 years’ experience in digital media, content creation and entertainment.
  • Carolyn Warren (Alberta) is a leader in the Canadian cultural sector and has experience with art and broadcasting institutions.
  • Janelle Wookey (Manitoba), is a Francophone Métis woman from the Prairies and an award-winning artist who works as an independent director and producer in Winnipeg.
  • Colm Feore, O.C. (Ontario) is a well-known theatre, film and television actor.
  • Marc Beaudet (Quebec) is a pioneer in the digital content industry in Quebec. He is president and CEO of Turbulent, a company that develops broadcasting platforms.
  • Monique Savoie (Quebec) is a digital visionary. In 1996, she created the Société des arts technologiques, a creative Montréal space dedicated to technological development.
  • Alanis Obomsawin, O.C., G.O.Q., C.A.L.Q. (Quebec) is a member of the Abenaki Nation and one of the most distinguished documentary filmmakers in Canada. For more than 40 years, she has been producing films at the National Film Board of Canada that tell about the lives and concerns of First Nations and deal with issues that are important to everyone.
  • Éric Larocque (New Brunswick) is active in projects related to Acadia and to his community, particularly those that deal with youth. He is director of the organizing committee for the 2021 Games of La Francophonie.

The advisory committee will provide the Minister with the names of qualified candidates for each vacant position, as well as supplementary qualified candidates to create a pool to fill posts in the future.

As the digital shift brings many changes in its wake, the public broadcaster continues to play a crucial role in providing us with information and entertainment, as well as helping guide the next generation. As a Crown corporation in the Canadian Heritage portfolio, CBC/Radio‑Canada is an organization that is independent from the government and responsible for its own day-to-day activities.

Quotes

“Our government firmly believes in the importance of our national public broadcaster, CBC/Radio‑Canada. I am pleased to establish this independent advisory committee composed of experts in broadcasting, digital technology and culture, who reflect Canada’s diversity. This new committee will recommend qualified candidates for a selection process that is open, transparent and based on merit.”

—The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage

Quick Facts

Under the Broadcasting Act, CBC/Radio‑Canada’s Board of Directors is composed of 12 directors, including a chair and a president/CEO, appointed by the Governor in Council during good behavior for a maximum period of five years.

The selection processes for the positions of chair, president/CEO, and part-time directors are posted on the Governor in Council’s website.

In 2016, the Government of Canada adopted a new approach that requires a selection process be initiated for full-time and part-time positions. Those interested can apply online.

All appointment opportunities for the 18 organizations in the Canadian Heritage portfolio are posted on the Governor in Council’s appointments site as they become available.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

Minister Joly Appoints Acting Chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

From a media release:

The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage, today announced the appointment of Judith A. Larocque as acting chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC). The Governor in Council approved the interim appointment for a term of four months, effective June 18, 2017. Ms. Larocque previously served as acting vice-chair of the CRTC (November 2016 to May 2017).

A dedicated public servant, Ms. Larocque has extensive experience in the broadcasting field. This interim appointment will ensure the continuous and efficient operation of the CRTC.

Selection processes at the CRTC, including for the position of chair, were launched on January 23, 2017, and are open, transparent and merit-based. They are ongoing. Appointments will be announced in due course.

We would like to thank Mr. Blais for his five years of service and his commitment to the CRTC.

Quotes

“In our changing world, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission works to ensure that all Canadians have access to a world-class communication system. It’s a challenging task, and I would like to thank Ms. Larocque for agreeing to stay on the CRTC team as acting chair.”

— The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage

Quick Facts

In 2016, the Government of Canada adopted a new approach that requires a selection process for full- and part-time positions.

All appointment opportunities for the 18 organizations in the Canadian Heritage Portfolio are posted as they become available on the Governor in Council Appointments website.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail