Tag Archives: Pure

CBC’s Sally Catto: Anne’s future still up in the air

There’s a simple, yet frustrating, reason a second season of Anne wasn’t announced at CBC’s upfront presentation on Wednesday morning. Netflix has yet to weigh in on its commitment to a sophomore go-round of Anne Shirley’s adventures in Avonlea.

“[A second season announcement] is pending,” Sally Catto, general manager, programming at CBC told us. “It’s a partnership and they’ve just started broadcast it.” That may be tough to swallow for fans who were left staring in shock at their TV screens after the cliffhanger season finale went dark, but that’s the nature of the television business today. More broadcasters and countries involved in a series can mean a waiting game.

As for fans of programs Pure, The Romeo Section, Michael: Every Day, Four in the Morning, Bellevue and This Life, it was a bitter pill to swallow after it was confirmed none will return for additional seasons on the public broadcaster.

Pure was beautifully received and done,” Catto explains of the Mennonite Mafia drama created by Michael Amo and starring Ryan Robbins, A.J. Buckley and Alex Paxton-Beesley. “If you look at it, it’s a contained story and that equally weighed into the decision. It wasn’t just a numbers decision. There was a beginning, middle and very final end to Pure. Of course, any series has the potential to have another season, but for Pure, it’s up against other programs that have been percolating in development and there is limited space in the schedule. You’re making a choice, and it’s not always easy.”

Crawford debuts this winter on CBC.

When it came to choosing new programming this fall and winter, Catto was looking for series to compliment what’s resonating with audiences. Though research plays a part in the decision, they’re looking for distinct voices and unique stories. Who has a story to tell? What’s their voice? What’s their vision? To be too narrow, she believes, is to miss gems in the making.

Catto sought to expand CBC’s comedy base by adding new projects in Mike Clattenburg’s Crawford and Little Dog from Joel Thomas Hynes. As for drama, Frankie Drake Mysteries is a natural new series to present to loyal fans of Murdoch Mysteries and literary adaptations of Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace and Lisa Moore’s Caught fit in the network’s structure.

As for The Council, we got a final word on its fate. René Balcer’s series “set against the unfolding drama of our changing planet and draws inspiration from the true-to-life fight over the vast and valuable resources of the Arctic” that was originally announced for the 2016-16 season is not moving forward.

Images courtesy of CBC.

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Link: Hulu acquires CBC crime drama ‘Pure’

From Nancy Tartaglione of Deadline:

Link: Hulu acquires CBC crime drama ‘Pure’
In their first SVOD deal, Cineflix Rights and Hulu have pacted on Cineflix Media’s new Canadian crime drama Pure. Under the agreement, the series will air exclusively on the streaming service in the U.S. The Michael Amo-created Pure launched at MIPTV earlier this month and recently premiered on the CBC, winning its timeslot and becoming the network’s top new drama. Continue reading.

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Comments and queries for the week of February 24

Is Saving Hope the same show as Code Black on the CBS network in the U.S., only renamed?? —Tom

No, Saving Hope is a different medical drama from Code Black. Set in Canada and with a Canadian cast and crew, Saving Hope is heading into its fifth season on CTV in Canada and returns on Sunday, March 12. You can read more about the show here.

Well! I did a marathon watch of Pure, Season 1, Episode 1-6, Well done CBC, well done. I look forward to more of Noah and family and Bronco, et al. This show was well scripted and well done. Right up there with Banshee. —Jon the Yooper from Down Under

OK, so after I invested all of this into the series and Googled things to learn more … that’s how they end it? There bloody well better be a Season 2 or that was just the worst ending ever!!!! —Chelan

Not sure how a second season would work: might be similar to Justified with a new bad guy each season. Could be Anna created a monster when she manipulated Joey Epp into murdering his “brooda.” But the main theme hanging out there from the final episode is Noah recovering his faith. That is such an internal story line that they will need something else to externalize his struggle. I hope Michael Amo is up to the task. —J Hess

Loved this show. I’ll be waiting for Season 2. —Sharon


[Kim’s Convenience] is one fantastic and truly hilarious funny show. Each character is well thought out and works utterly great with each other. I can not simply stop gushing over this unique family show. Thank you for bringing finally a clean, lovable sitcom to our home. I am 58 years old and have seen for over five decades of TV series. This is the only show that I can watch over and over and find it truly wonderful. Again, my thanks to all who have given us a great show. —Leslie

 

Got a question or comment about Canadian TV? Email greg.david@tv-eh.com or via Twitter @tv_eh.

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Comments and queries for the week of February 17

Could you please explain [in Pure‘s season finale] why when Noah returned from Mexico did he hug his wife, send the kid into the church and walk away? Wasn’t saving the boy more than enough to overcome his religious beliefs? Why didn’t his wife stop him as she vowed to stick by him at all costs? Please let me know. —Bob

Great question and one that I asked myself. The fact that Noah was standing there in the rain signified, for me anyway, that he was being cleansed of all sin and could enter the church. I’m thinking that while others might feel that way—his wife included—he still felt unclean and had gone too far over his own line to be able to enter the church.

Here’s how Ryan Robbins, the actor who played Noah, interpreted the scene. This is just what Ryan’s take on it is: “Noah promised his son he wouldn’t miss the baptism. But I don’t think he felt worthy of entering the sacred place after what he’d done. His wife coming out was likely a surprise to him. He’s going to need to find forgiveness from God and be able to forgive himself, if that’s even possible. The children were all still in the church. Perhaps Anna didn’t want to leave them, especially on such a special day. Side note, did you notice he was wearing Bronco’s clothes?”


The [Heartland] storyline on all fronts is unrealistic. Ty gone, Lou is in and out, Lisa gone most of the time. The two kids are being parented by grandpa and aunt. Is the show coming to a gradual halt? —Brenda

I started watching the show because of Amy and the horses. As a lifelong horsewoman, I know that Amy is the real deal. Then I fell in love with Ty, and the Amy and Ty love story. I’ve watched every episode and am very disappointed in this season. Ty Borden would never leave his pregnant wife, the very idea is ridiculous. He has a job and a pregnant wife and he leaves for months … no. Just no. If Amy wasn’t pregnant, and I wish she wasn’t because I want to see her ride and train, then I could see Ty leaving for a while, but it really sucks this season. Very disappointed, stupid storyline. —Hunter

Just started watching this year. We love the show. Amazing scenery. Entertaining story line. Nice to hear Canadian cities mentioned. Very refreshing. Hope it continues for many more years. —Joe

 

Got a question or comment about Canadian TV? Email greg.david@tv-eh.com or via Twitter @tv_eh.

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Pure’s season finale: Faith, the Funks and fighting back

Things don’t look good for Noah Funk on Pure. His plan to out Eli Voss to O’Reilly and the rest of the DEA backfired in a major way: she was shot and survived. Sadly, the same can’t be said for Abel: Eli shot him in the chest and left him to die in the quarry. Clearly, Eli is a man of his word when it comes to threats; but is Noah?

With the final episode of Pure Season 1, “Baptism,” airing Monday night on CBC, here’s the network’s synopsis:

Forced to choose between his beliefs or his life, Noah crosses the ultimate moral line in his showdown with Eli Voss.
And here a few little tidbits we gleaned from watching the screener:
Eli isn’t done killing
When Episode 6 begins, Voss makes a phone call to Ontario and has a deadly request for Gerry Epp. Hats off to Peter Outerbridge for his performance; Eli is a cold-blooded character I can’t help but love seeing on screen. He’s alway bad news, but he’s been fun to watch. Last week I highlighted a scene between Noah and Eli as the best of the season. I was wrong; their scene this week is better.
O’Reilly calls out Bronco
In an amazing scene at the DEA office, Bronco and O’Reilly go head-to-head and she spells out his shortcomings in just a few intense sentences. Michael Amo’s dialogue is spare, but when his characters speak, they get right to the point.
Anna speaks her mind
Anna Funk has quietly been a pillar of strength for her family, and she steps up once again (with words and fresh baking) when danger comes her way. Will her words fall on deaf ears … or make her situation worse?
What have you thought of the first season of Pure? Comment below!

Images courtesy of CBC.

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