Everything about Degrassi, eh?

Link: Where are the season 1 Degrassi cast now?

From Chris E. Hayner of Zap2it:

‘Degrassi: The Next Generation’ Season 1 cast: Where are they now?
It’s been 13 years since “Degrassi: The Next Generation” first aired on Canada, introducing a new group of teenagers to the ongoing drama at one high school in Canada. Since then, many cast members have cycled through the series. That’s the nature of a show where the school is the main character — students graduate and move away. Still, there will only ever be one original “TNG” class. If you’ve ever wondered what your favorite actors from the first season of “Degrassi: The Next Generation” are up to, it’s Zap2it to the rescue. While many of them are still acting, you might be surprised what some did after the show. Continue reading.

Tonight: Rick Mercer Report, 22 Minutes, Degrassi, Why Horror?

Rick Mercer Report, CBC
Rick helps with the wheat harvest at a family farm in Camrose, Alberta and then heads to Barrington, Nova Scotia for a lesson in log-rolling.

22 Minutes, CBC
Toronto Maple Leaf Joffrey Lupul and Mark Critch get game ready; legendary correspondent Babe Bennett returns with her views on reproduction.

Degrassi, MTV – “Smells Like Teen Spirit”
In the Season 14 premiere of DEGRASSI, Clare has a serious dilemma that will affect her entire future and confides in Alli. Zoë sees red when Becky tells her she’s too much of a distraction for the power cheer team. It’s time for Zoë to bring Becky down, literally. Miles and Tristan are getting close, but with his campaign in full swing, Mr. Hollingsworth is worried his son’s behaviour could damage his political prospects. An upset Miles decides to take annoying his father to a whole new level.

Why Horror? documentary, Super Channel
Why Horror? includes in-depth conversations with international horror filmmakers such as George A. Romero, Takashi Shimizu, Alexandre Aja, Ben Wheatley, Alex de la Iglesia and Canadian scare Queens Jen and Sylvia Soska, as well as countless other writers, historians, scientists and psychologists.

Degrassi’s secret to success

“Isn’t it extraordinary that it’s gone this long?” There’s definitely a hint of wonder in Linda Schuyler’s voice when she says that. And why not? In a television world where fickle viewers and nervous networks can mean the end of series before it ever gets a footing, Degrassi marches on.

Tuesday’s return of the teen drama to MTV is Season 14 of the current incarnation, a stunning achievement on its own. But factor in  the fact the franchise will be celebrating 35 years in 2015 and the mind boggles. You’d think that after that amount of time, Schuyler or Stephen Stohn would consider walking away and resting. You would be wrong.

“I love it. We learned something early on in The Next Generation, which was to have the courage to graduate our kids,” she explains. “There is a fear in TV that if you lose a tranche of people you’re going to lose your audience. We were scared to graduate that first group because in the classic show we basically stayed with the same kids for almost 100 episodes.” Schuyler and the Degrassi team have found a formula for success by bringing in new students and allowing the audience to get to know them while the old favourites are still in class. Aside from constantly replenishing the performers, the writing room is injected with fresh voices too. The result? A project continually rejuvenated by fresh blood.

From the very beginning Degrassi dared to tell real-life stories about teens to teens. Teenage drinking, pregnancy, bullying, abuse and sexual lifestyle choices have always been front and centre in scripts, a trend that continues Tuesday night with “Smells Like Teen Spirit.” Clare (Aislinn Paul) sees her carefully planned world turned upside down over a dalliance with Drew (Luke Bilyk), Miles’ (Eric Osborne) relationship with Tristan (Lyle Lettau) may have an impact on his father’s political plans, and Zoë (Ana Golja) and Becky (Sarah Fisher) butt heads over cheerleading. Those three storylines aren’t necessarily new to the franchise, but fresh cast means they can be tackled from a new point of view.

“We’ve run many different gay storylines, but when you bring in different characters you can look at it from a different side of the prism,” Schuyler says. “You get a new take on an old storyline, plus there are new things happening in the media all the time that keep us inspired and thinking. Nothing is taboo.”

Degrassi airs Tuesdays at 9 p.m. ET on MTV.

Link: The Degrassi success story

From James Bawden:

Degrassi: A Canadian TV Success Story
Linda Schuyer and I, we go way, way back. I first met her when she was producing her first series The Kids Of Degrassi Street in 1979. I was still with The Hamilton Spectator in those days and Linda had until recently been a senior public school teacher at Earl Grey school in Riverdale. The Kids Of Degrassi ran over five seasons (until 1984) for a grand total of only 24 episodes. It was a different series for kids, filmed on the menacing streets of south Riverdale and starring a gaggle of young amateurs who were well nigh irresistible. Continue reading.