Tag Archives: AMI TV

AMI’s Mind Set Go inspires Canadians to transform their minds and bodies

I truly relate to the participants of AMI-tv’s documentary series, Mind Set Go, which kicks off its second season on Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET. I’ve struggled with my weight for most of my life and have had to deal with the mental blocks that kept me from achieving my health and fitness goals. Over the past few years, I changed my focus from short-term fixes to a long-term wellness plan, and I’ve lost around 50 pounds. Despite that success, it’s still a daily challenge, and I often have days when I have to battle negative thoughts.

As it so happens, overcoming negative thoughts is the entire point of Mind Set Go, which follows the journeys of eight overweight Canadians as they attempt to change their lives for the healthier.

Para-athlete Pamela LeJean helps Mind Set Go participant Danielle on her fitness journey.

“It’s all about the brain, and it’s all about your mindset,” supervising producer Sophie Morgadinho explains during a phone interview from Toronto. “It’s not like a diet. It’s stopping the behaviours that are causing you to be unhealthy, and it really starts with changing the way you think about yourself and what you’re doing every day.”

Helping the show’s participants to transform their outlooks and bodies are fitness and health experts Julie and Lowell Taylor (The Amazing Race Canada) and a group of Canadian Paralympians. One of those Paralympians is Para Hall of Famer and retired para-alpine skier Karolina Wisniewska, who says she was thrilled to take part in the series.

“I think the thing that appealed to me most of all was this opportunity to be in a position to kind of inspire or help someone based on the things I learned as a high-performance athlete,” she says. “And on another maybe more personal level, I retired from alpine skiing in 2011 due to a concussion, and after my retirement, I too had struggled with maintaining my fitness. So I could really relate to what maybe some of these participants on the show were experiencing themselves.”

Each expanded, one-hour episode of the show follows a participant as he or she attempts to get fit and triumph over some of the mental hurdles that have tripped them up in the past. For self-professed “sugar addict” Dana, who is featured in the season premiere and paired with Paralympian powerlifter Ness Murby, that means confronting the grief she tried to suppress with food after her father died. For formerly fit Darryl, who is featured in the sixth episode and paired with Wisniewska, that means coming to grips with a degenerative hearing condition that left him profoundly deaf.

“My strong feeling with Daryl was that he just really needed somebody to bounce ideas off of and to talk him through it and to kind of think about what was resonating with him,” says Wisniewska. “The second aspect, I think, is that he did need a bit of a kick in the butt.”

Para Hall of Famer and former para-alpine skier Karolina Wisniewska.

Wisniewska was more than happy to provide that kick. While she says her history of concussions makes her very empathetic towards those who are facing adversity, being born with cerebral palsy makes her want to push able-bodied people to meet their full fitness potential.

“I’m someone who was born with a disability, and I’ve never understood able-bodied people who take their bodies for granted,” she says. “So that’s where my competitive athlete side comes out, and I’m like, ‘Oh, my god. Stop making excuses. You have no excuse, just do it.'”

At the beginning of their journeys, Dana, Darryl and the other participants all choose a physical challenge to complete at the end of their three-month transformations. These challenges, which include a mountain climb and a long-distance bike ride, are designed to provide a measuring stick for the physical and mental progress each person has made. While the Taylors and the Paralympians are a key part of the process, in the end, the participants have to look inside themselves for the inspiration they need to succeed–a situation Wisneiwska is very familiar with.

“At the end of the day, in ski racing, you’re at the top of the hill, you have to kick out of the start gate, and you have to race that race,” she says. “Nobody else is going to do it.”

According to Morgadinho, watching people overcome their mental demons and achieve their health goals was a motivating experience for everyone involved with the series.

“Working on the show, I have to tell you, it’s been really inspiring because I see people make transformations in their lives,” she says. “And it’s not like Biggest Loser. You’re not going to see someone come back 100 pounds lighter. It’s not about that. But you see a difference in their confidence and their happiness, and they’re healthier, they look better.”

She continues, “For me, it’s very inspiring to look at the things that I can change and go, ‘I know I’m in control of this. I have to change how I look at the problem and how I look at the solution.’ I hope that viewers are also inspired to make positive, healthy changes.”

Upcoming episodes of the series feature Canadian Paralympians  Michelle Stilwell, David Willsie, Ina Forrest, Pamela LeJean, Shawna Ryan and Andrew Haley.

Mind Set Go airs Wednesdays at 8 p.m. ET on AMI-tv.

Images courtesy of AMI.

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Season two of AMI-tv’s Employable Me premieres on September 14

From a media release:

Accessible Media Inc. (AMI) announced today that the second season of the award-winning Employable Me will return Friday, September 14, at 7 p.m. ET on AMI-tv.

Based on a UK format, the Canadian edition of Employable Me is a moving six-part documentary series featuring job seekers who are determined to show that having a physical disability or neurological condition shouldn’t make them unemployable. Season one of Employable Me captured a 2018 Rockie Award for Best Lifestyle Program at the Banff World Media Festival and the Diversify TV’s Excellence Award for Representation of Disability in the Non-Scripted Category at MIPCOM 2017.

Produced by Thomas Howe Associates Inc. (THA), the sophomore season of Employable Me provides an honest and emotional look at the challenges Canadians of varying abilities face in the job market. Each one-hour episode features two job seekers who are blind, partially sighted or have a neurological condition such as Tourette Syndrome or Autism Spectrum Disorder as they embark on a journey to possible employment.

Among the companies participating in Season two are Lush Fresh Handmade Cosmetics, Variety Village, Malabar Limited and the Greater Toronto Airports Authority.

Additionally, digital exclusives available at AMI.ca revisit Season one job seekers to update viewers on where they are now in their careers.

Each instalment of Employable Me focuses on the strengths and inherent talents of potential employees with the help of experts in the medical and hiring fields. Season two experts and community partners include The Redpath Centre, Epilepsy Toronto, CNIB, Special Olympics and March of Dimes Canada. The journey isn’t always easy, but each participant is determined to overcome their challenges, change employers’ perceptions and land a job they’re truly passionate about.

In keeping with AMI’s mandate of making accessible media for all Canadians, Employable Me utilizes Integrated Described Video (IDV) to make them accessible to individuals who are blind or partially-sighted.

Employable Me is produced by THA in partnership with AMI and TVO, and is licensed by all3media international.

Season two of Employable Me premieres beginning Friday, September 14, at 7 p.m. ET. Stream full Season one episodes on AMI.ca or via the AMI App.

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Season two of Eyes for the Job to premiere July 31 on AMI-tv

From a media release:

Accessible Media Inc. (AMI) announced today that Season two of Eyes for the Job, the 13-part television series focused on home improvement and do-it-yourself projects starring Chris Judge and Alex Haider, will premiere on Tuesday, July 31, at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. ET on AMI-tv.

Produced by Clerisy Entertainment, Eyes for the Job is set in Halifax and features Nova Scotian co-hosts Chris Judge and Alex Haider. A lifelong handyman and do-it-yourself enthusiast, Chris brings a unique perspective to the program: he is blind. Working alongside Chris is Alex Haider, who shares Chris’ creativity and enthusiasm and boasts some serious social media and outreach know-how. Together, they’ll inform, entertain and inspire viewers to expand their DIY abilities in new and exciting ways.

In Season two, Chris steps up his DIY game. He’s started a community workshop in the heart of the city and has the space, tools and materials for some seriously cool creations. With Alex by his side, Chris tackles several projects both in the workshop and in the community, with help from friends.

In keeping with AMI’s mandate of making accessible media for all Canadians, Season two of Eyes for the Job features Integrated Described Video (IDV), where Chris and Alex describe their actions and surroundings during filming to make the program accessible to individuals with vision loss.

Beginning on July 31Eyes for the Job airs Tuesdays at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. ET on AMI-tv.

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Anaïd Productions and AMI-tv announce the start of production on the second season of Mind Set Go

From a media release:

Following the success of the first season of Mind Set Go, Anaïd Productions and AMI-tv announced today that production on the second season of the Vancouver-shot documentary series has begun.

Mind Set Go follows the three-month journey of eight Canadians as they push their limits and overcome the physical and mental barriers preventing them from reaching their fitness and wellness goals. Season 2 of Mind Set Go will air in 2019 on AMI-tv and will feature eight, one-hour episodes.

In each episode, one participant seeks to understand and overcome their negative coping behaviours with insight from returning fitness and health experts Lowell and Julie Taylor (Amazing Race Canada), and from Canadian Paralympians and para-athletes. Learning that a positive mindset can go a long way, these athletes, who have triumphed over adversities in their own lives, share their experiences with participants to help them overcome their biggest obstacles. At the end of three months, each participant tackles a demanding fitness goal that reveals the progress they’ve made throughout their journey.

Mind Set Go features Integrated Described Video (IDV) and is accessible to audience members who are blind or partially sighted.

The series is developed and produced by Anaïd Productions in association with Accessible Media Inc., with the participation of the Canadian Paralympic Committee, Canada Media Fund, Rogers Telefund, and the Province of British Columbia Film Incentive BC.

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Preview: Growing Sense adds gardening to AMI’s stable of original programs

Here in Southern Ontario, it appears winter is over. Squirrels are bounding all over the place, birds are waking me up and the crocuses in my front garden are in bloom. With the first day of spring officially arriving on March 20, AMI-tv is marking the occasion with the debut of its latest series, Growing Sense.

Airing Tuesdays at 8:30 p.m. ET/PT on AMI-tv, each of Growing Sense‘s 10 episodes follow novice gardener Milena Khazanavicius and veteran ecological landscaper Rosmarie Lohnes as they build and tend an accessible garden plot in Halifax’s Common Roots Urban Farm. 

“I believe that when we heal the earth, we heal ourselves,” Lohnes says in the show’s opening credits. It’s sage advice. Viewers are first introduced to Khazanavicius, who once worked as a floral designer with dreams of opening her own shop before losing her sight at the age of 22. She and seeing eye dog Lewis hit up a local Halifax flower shop to nab some herbs for her balcony boxes. It’s at this store we learn Khazanavicius’ life story and the pleasure she derives from the smells and textures of flowers and plants. 

Lohnes, meanwhile, outlines her tale. The daughter of a miner who worked in Northern Ontario, childhoods were spent camping in the woods where she developed her “superpower.” Now she’s founded Helping Nature Heal, which restores sustainable ecosystems and connects people with nature.

The pair, introduced months ago, reunite with a bold plan: fill a community garden plot with plants and vegetables designed to reconnect Khazanavicius with her passion for plants while giving her food to augment her fixed income. Khazanavicius’ first challenge? Getting there.

Featuring integrated described video, Growing Sense is a wonderful addition to AMI’s quickly growing stable of original programming that is blind or partially sighted viewers but enjoyable by all.

Growing Sense airs Tuesdays at 8:30 p.m. ET/PT on AMI-tv.

Image courtesy of AMI.

 

[themoneytizer id=”12602-28″]

 

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail