Tag Archives: CRTC

Link: Mélanie Joly’s Netflix deal fails to address the real issues for Canadian content creators

From Kate Taylor of The Globe and Mail:

Link: Mélanie Joly’s Netflix deal fails to address the real issues for Canadian content creators
Is any of this going to change with the sparkly $500-million five-year Netflix deal that Minister of Canadian Heritage Mélanie Joly announced Thursday as she unveiled her new cultural policy? Not likely. The deal, which coincides with a commitment not to tax online services, is merely political cover for Joly as she fails to resolve the central issue her review was supposed to address: how to update analog-era supports for Canadian creators so that they can thrive in the digital age. Continue reading.

 

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Link: Canada’s new cultural policy: The 10 key takeaways; plus Melanie Joly’s speech

From Daniel Leblanc and Mayaz Alam of The Globe and Mail:

Link: Canada’s new cultural policy: The 10 key takeaways
On Thursday, the Heritage Minister unveils ‘Creative Canada,’ the first major overhaul of the cultural funding regime in more than 25 years. Here’s what you need to know. Continue reading. 

Here’s a link to a transcript of today’s speech.

 

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Link: Netflix to commit $500M over 5 years on new Canadian productions: sources

From Catherine Cullen of CBC News:

Link: Netflix to commit $500M over 5 years on new Canadian productions: sources
Internet streaming service Netflix will spend at least half a billion dollars over the next five years to fund original Canadian productions, CBC News has learned.

The funding will officially be announced tomorrow by Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly as part of a speech unveiling her vision for Canadian content and cultural industries in the digital world. It comes after months of public consultations, which were held last year. Continue reading.

 

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Link: A look at what’s on the line for Canada’s cultural industry

From Susan Krashinsky Robertson of The Globe and Mail:

Link: A look at what’s on the line for Canada’s cultural industry
Heritage Minister Mélanie Joly is set to unveil her vision for the future of Canada’s $48-billion broadcasting, media and cultural industries in a much-anticipated speech on Thursday. The scale of coming upheaval – potentially touching everything from publishing to the music and gaming industries to arts funding – hasn’t been seen in more than 25 years. Continue reading.

 

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The Government of Canada wants to ensure the right balance of investment in content and in the ability to compete

From a media release:

The Governor in Council, on the advice of the Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage, with support of Cabinet, referred back for reconsideration and hearing the Broadcasting Decisions CRTC 2017-143 to 2017-147 (renewing licenses for television services of major French-language ownership groups) and CRTC 2017-148 to 2017-151 (renewing licenses for television services of major English-language ownership groups) of May 15, 2017.

“Canadian broadcasters and creators are at the centre of the broadcasting system, and at a time when our competitive advantage rests on creativity, they must be positioned to succeed.

The Government of Canada recognizes the significant investments Canadian broadcasters make in Canadian content. At the same time, the entire industry is in transition and the next few years will be critical to establishing the conditions for Canadians to be able to compete with the best in the world.

During this period of transition across the industry, original Canadian content and a dynamic creative sector are vital to the sector’s competitiveness, and its contribution to the Canadian economy.

We are asking the CRTC to reconsider these decisions in order to ensure that we achieve the right balance of investment in content and in the ability to compete.

In referring back these decisions, the Government wishes to affirm its support for great Canadian dramas, comedies, animation, films, documentaries — and other programs of national interest — that reflect our country and its diversity. It also recognizes the importance of original French-language content and support for the creators of music programming, short films and short-form documentaries.

As we look to the future of Canadian content, we must be bold. That’s why, this fall, I will present a vision that supports our cultural industries through this transformation and will bring us in line with the changing digital environment.”

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