Everything about Anne, eh?

Anne begins principal photography on Season 2 for CBC and Netflix

From a media release:

Northwood Entertainment is delighted to announce that principal photography has commenced for season two of the universally acclaimed series ANNE (WITH AN E). The series, currently shooting in various locations in Ontario and PEI, will return for 10 episodes on CBC in Canada and globally – everywhere outside of Canada – on Netflix in 2018.

Inspired by the timeless Canadian young adult novel Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery, the second season of ANNE (WITH AN E) will continue to chart bold new territory, adding new characters and storylines while continuing to explore themes of identity, prejudice, feminism, bullying, gender parity and empowerment through the lens of its fierce, starry-eyed, irrepressible 14-year-old protagonist.

Creator and executive producer/showrunner, Moira Walley-Beckett (Breaking Bad, Flesh and Bone) is excited about this groundbreaking season, stating, “Exploring modern topical issues in the world of this beloved character is a thrilling endeavor, and I hope this season ignites, unites, and inspires young people around the world.”

ANNE (WITH AN E) stars returning fan favorites Amybeth McNulty (Anne Shirley-Cuthbert), Geraldine James (Marilla Cuthbert), R.H. Thomson (Matthew Cuthbert), Corrine Koslo (Rachel Lynde), Dalila Bela (Diana Barry), Aymeric Jett Montaz (Jerry Baynard), Lucas Zumann (Gilbert Blythe) and Kyla Matthews (Ruby Gillis). This season will also introduce audiences to new characters including Dalmar Abuzeid (Sebastian) and Cory Grüter-Andrew (Cole).

A CBC and Netflix original series, ANNE (WITH AN E) is produced by Northwood Entertainment and created by Moira Walley-Beckett. The executive producers are Miranda de Pencier, Moira Walley-Beckett, Sally Catto, Elizabeth Bradley, Alex Sapot, Debra Hayward, Alison Owen and Ken Girotti. John Calvert serves as producer.

 

 

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CBC and Netflix renew Anne for a second season

From a media release:

CBC and Netflix today announced they have renewed acclaimed series ANNE (WITH AN E) for a second season. Produced by Miranda de Pencier’s Northwood Entertainment, the second season sees an increased order from eight hours to 10 and begins shooting this fall. Adored by audiences and critics alike, this reimagined coming-of-age story follows Anne (Amybeth McNulty), an outsider who, against all odds, fights for love, acceptance, and her place in the world. Season two of the series (known as ANNE in Canada, and ANNE WITH AN E on Netflix) returns in 2018.

Inspired by the timeless Canadian young adult novel Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery, the second season will continue to chart bold new territory, adding new characters and storylines and continuing to explore themes of identity, prejudice, feminism, bullying, gender parity and empowerment through the lens of its fierce, starry-eyed, irrepressible 14-year-old protagonist.

The series stars Amybeth McNulty (Anne Shirley), Geraldine James (Marilla Cuthbert), R.H. Thomson (Matthew Cuthbert), Corrine Koslo (Rachel Lynde), Dalila Bela (Diana Barry), Aymeric Jett Montaz (Jerry Baynard) and Lucas Jade Zumann (Gilbert Blythe).

For season two, three-time Emmy® Award-winning series creator Moira Walley-Beckett (BREAKING BAD, FLESH AND BONE) has assembled an exceptionally talented all-female writers’ room. Episodes will be written by Moira Walley-Beckett, Jane Maggs (BELLEVUE, CARDINAL), Shernold Edwards (HAVEN, SLEEPY HOLLOW), Kathryn Borel (RUSH, AMERICAN DAD), Amanda Fahey (SAVING HOPE, MOHAWK GIRLS), and Naledi Jackson (21 THUNDER, THE DETAIL).

A CBC and Netflix original series, ANNE (WITH AN E) is produced by Northwood Entertainment, and created by Moira Walley-Beckett. The executive producers are Miranda de Pencier, Moira Walley-Beckett, Sally Catto, Elizabeth Bradley, Alex Sapot, Debra Hayward, and Alison Owen. John Calvert serves as producer. ANNE (WITH AN E) is inspired by “Anne of Green Gables” by Lucy Maud Montgomery.

 

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CBC’s Sally Catto: Anne’s future still up in the air

There’s a simple, yet frustrating, reason a second season of Anne wasn’t announced at CBC’s upfront presentation on Wednesday morning. Netflix has yet to weigh in on its commitment to a sophomore go-round of Anne Shirley’s adventures in Avonlea.

“[A second season announcement] is pending,” Sally Catto, general manager, programming at CBC told us. “It’s a partnership and they’ve just started broadcast it.” That may be tough to swallow for fans who were left staring in shock at their TV screens after the cliffhanger season finale went dark, but that’s the nature of the television business today. More broadcasters and countries involved in a series can mean a waiting game.

As for fans of programs Pure, The Romeo Section, Michael: Every Day, Four in the Morning, Bellevue and This Life, it was a bitter pill to swallow after it was confirmed none will return for additional seasons on the public broadcaster.

Pure was beautifully received and done,” Catto explains of the Mennonite Mafia drama created by Michael Amo and starring Ryan Robbins, A.J. Buckley and Alex Paxton-Beesley. “If you look at it, it’s a contained story and that equally weighed into the decision. It wasn’t just a numbers decision. There was a beginning, middle and very final end to Pure. Of course, any series has the potential to have another season, but for Pure, it’s up against other programs that have been percolating in development and there is limited space in the schedule. You’re making a choice, and it’s not always easy.”

Crawford debuts this winter on CBC.

When it came to choosing new programming this fall and winter, Catto was looking for series to compliment what’s resonating with audiences. Though research plays a part in the decision, they’re looking for distinct voices and unique stories. Who has a story to tell? What’s their voice? What’s their vision? To be too narrow, she believes, is to miss gems in the making.

Catto sought to expand CBC’s comedy base by adding new projects in Mike Clattenburg’s Crawford and Little Dog from Joel Thomas Hynes. As for drama, Frankie Drake Mysteries is a natural new series to present to loyal fans of Murdoch Mysteries and literary adaptations of Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace and Lisa Moore’s Caught fit in the network’s structure.

As for The Council, we got a final word on its fate. René Balcer’s series “set against the unfolding drama of our changing planet and draws inspiration from the true-to-life fight over the vast and valuable resources of the Arctic” that was originally announced for the 2016-16 season is not moving forward.

Images courtesy of CBC.

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Links: Anne with an E

From Sarah Larson of The New Yorker:

Link: How not to adapt Anne of Green Gables
So we see flashbacks to Anne’s life with an abusive family and in the orphanage—another fine idea in principle. In one flashback, vicious girls, spitting threats and insults, taunt Anne with a dead mouse in a grimy alcove; afterward, she comforts herself by stroking its fur sorrowfully. When we cut back to the present, she says, in a hollow tone, “I’ll be as quiet as a mouse,” as dead-eyed as the twins in “The Shining.” We should empathize here, but we’re too busy seething. Continue reading.

From Joanna Robinson of Vanity Fair:

Link: Anne of Green Gables: Netflix’s bleak adaptation gets it all so terribly wrong
Still, none of the many, many other Anne adaptations stray so disastrously far from the spirit of Montgomery’s original books—and the result is a gloomy series with grim, life-or-death stakes draped over the bones of something beloved, warm-hearted, and familiar. The milestones are still there—currant wine, broken slates, puffed sleeves—but seen through a glass darkly. Brave as the concept may be, it falls flat—and feels particularly unwelcome in an already grim 2017. Continue reading.

From Marissa Martinelli of Slate.com:

Link: Netflix’s dark, gritty reboot of Anne of Green Gables has all the subtlety of a chalkboard smashed over your head
The show’s lack of nuance is especially evident while trying to assert its modern sensibilities. Walley-Beckett’s adaptation of Anne is so worried about announcing itself as feminist that it forgets that its source material already was. Continue reading.

From Sophie Gilbert of The Atlantic:

Link: Anne with an E is the best kind of adaptation
So Anne With an E, created by Moira Walley-Beckett, a longtime writer and producer on Breaking Bad, isn’t exactly inventing darkness for the story so much as reading between the lines. It’s Anne of Green Gables for 21st-century audiences, who are perhaps more sympathetic to the idea that children can suffer. That’s not to say darkness defines the show. Anne With an E captures the winning exuberance of Anne Shirley—who, played by AmyBeth McNulty, is entirely irresistible—while finding some deeper potency in her story. The first two episodes offer a gripping and moving setup for the rest of the season, portraying how Anne, despite improbable odds, persuades the elderly Cuthberts to love her. Continue reading.

From Jen Chaney of The Vulture:

Link: Anne of Green Gables fans, you will love Netflix’s Anne with an E
Lifelong fans of the Anne of Green Gables series should find much to admire here, but the newly initiated will be just as easily drawn into the town of Avonlea, where Anne and the Cuthberts live, and enchanted by the open-hearted wonder with which Anne greets the world and spins her creative yarns. Continue reading.

From Lorraine Ali of the L.A. Times:

Link: Netflix moves to Green Gables with scrappy, irresistible Anne with an E 
If only television treated all its teenage girls with the same respect “Anne with an E” affords its whip-smart, scrappy protagonist. Continue reading.

From Allison Keene of Collider:

Link: Netflix’s Green Gables adaptation has grit
Once Anne arrives at Green Gables, it’s a spiritual transformation. She is given hope and new focus on fulfilling her dreams of friendship, education, and both familial and romantic love.  Continue reading.

From Mark Dawidziak of Cleveland.com:

Link: Anne with an E pursues a darker shade of Green Gables
While remaining true to the spirit of Anne and the book, this Netflix series reminds us that Montgomery wrote her novel for all ages. She did not consider it just a children’s book. And it wasn’t designated a children’s book until many decades after its publication. Continue reading.

From Gwen Ihnat of The AV Club:

Link: Anne with an E offers a winning, darker take on a familiar tale
Amybeth McNulty defies her youth with a performance that’s less a portrayal of Anne than an absolute possession. It can’t be easy to make Anne’s fanciful language sing the way she does, and McNulty captures the endearing awkwardness that enables Anne to win over everyone she comes in contact with. Continue reading.

 

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Link: The sisterhood of Anne of Green Gables is ready for Anne’s next chapter

From Katie Calautti of Vanity Fair:

Link: The sisterhood of Anne of Green Gables is ready for Anne’s next chapter
“L.M. Montgomery was writing in a time period where there were not a lot of women’s voices being heard nearly loudly enough nor often enough—and yet somehow she gave voice to a brave little girl whose loud and important voice is still resonating. I’m just thrilled that as woman producers today, we can continue to push the strength of L.M. Montgomery’s spirit through our Anne Shirley. Anne with an E is definitely our feminist rallying cry.” Continue reading.

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