Everything about Kim’s Convenience, eh?

Kim’s Convenience’s Amanda Brugel on diversity on Canadian TV

From Hermione Wilson of The TV Junkies:

Kim’s Convenience’s Amanda Brugel on diversity on Canadian TV
“I think the explosion of the consciousness of the lack of diversity, particularly on social media, has really helped push things along. The younger generation especially is demanding that they are reflected on TV. I don’t think we’re near where we should be, but it’s progress.” Continue reading.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

Link: In Kim’s Convenience, Canada’s first Asian sitcom family finds voice

From Grace Lee of NBC News:

Link: In Kim’s Convenience, Canada’s first Asian sitcom family finds voice
When Ins Choi found himself playwriting for an Asian-Canadian theater company, he didn’t have to look far for source material. For “Kim’s Convenience,” Choi found inspiration in his experiences growing up in Canada. The play was adapted into a television show and became a breakthrough for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation — the country’s national public broadcaster — premiering Canada’s first Asian leads in a TV sitcom in October. Continue reading.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

Link: Taking Stock Of TV’s ‘Kim’s Convenience’

From D.K. Latta of the Huffington Post:

Link: Taking Stock Of TV’s ‘Kim’s Convenience’
One can quibble whether the series is truly the first Canadian series to feature a predominantly Asian cast. It was preceded by Omni TV’s crime drama, Blood and Water (which also featured Liu as the son of immigrants), and some years earlier by the memorable CBC cops n’ mobsters mini-series, Dragon Boys. But certainly by virtue of being on a major network, an open-ended format, and the populist idiom of a sitcom, Kim’s Convenience is hoping to put a pin in the map of Canada’s evolving pop cultural landscape. Continue reading.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

Link: Asian Canadian female stars tackle identity and invisibility on Canadian TV

From Craig Takeuchi of The Georgia Strait:

Link: Asian-Canadian female stars tackle identity and invisibility on Canadian TV
An auspicious event has occurred in Canadian TV: a virtual Asian Canadian Joy Luck Club has formed.

At the metaphorical mahjong table, in the seat of the South Wind is Blood and Water’s Steph Song, who plays gutsy Vancouver detective Jo Bradley. The ambitious cop headed up a case involving a powerful real-estate billionaire and his family in the first eight episodes of the multilingual OMNI Television crime drama. She delves even further into the investigation—as well as her own family history and her cancer treatment—in the next eight episodes, which start on November 13. Continue reading.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

Link: Family Guy

From Scott Anderson of U of T magazine:

Link: Family Guy
Actor Paul Sun-Hyung Lee, the star of CBC’s new comedy Kim’s Convenience, has never been as busy with work as he is now. He says this as if he can’t quite believe his good fortune, having stumbled across a role a decade ago – Appa, the Korean owner of a convenience store in Toronto’s Regent Park – that’s gone on to define his career. Continue reading.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail