A woman and a man in 1920s clothing.

Preview: Frankie Drake Mysteries, “A Brother in Arms”

Thanks to the federal election debate on Monday night, Murdoch Mysteries is pre-empted a week. Not so for Frankie Drake Mysteries, which returns with a new storyline written by Karen Hill and Ley Lukins and directed by Mina Shum.

Here’s the official synopsis on “A Brother in Arms,” from the CBC:

Frankie’s floored when a man claiming to be her half-brother shows up at the agency begging her to help his wrongly imprisoned friend.

And here a few more details I gathered up after watching the episode in advance.

A group of people at a 1920s bar.Wendy is back … and in a new setting
Fans of Grace Lynn Kung’s recurring character will be happy to see Wendy Quon back serving drinks. And, she’s got swanky new digs to do it in. Also? We’re re-introduced to Tickles. Ah, the 1920s.

Dillon Casey guest stars
The former Remedy star appears as Frankie’s aforementioned half-brother, Jack Drake. Is he really related to Frankie? Personally, I was thrilled to see Dillon Casey back on my television screen, because he’s a great actor and a truly nice guy. He opened up about his opioid addiction in this excellent interview with the Toronto Star‘s Tony Wong. Look for Kenny Wong, Jake Epstein, Richard Walters and, yes, Wendy Crewson on Monday night.

Racism rears its ugly head
Sadly, racism isn’t anything new and plays a major part in Monday’s A-storyline regarding Jack’s friend, Li Chang (Kenny Wong), being imprisoned. As part of the investigation, Wendy gives Frankie the backstory on Chinese immigrants, and Frankie Drake Mysteries‘ visual effects department does it in a unique way.

Frankie Drake Mysteries airs Mondays at 9 p.m. on CBC.

Images courtesy of CBC.

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

One thought on “Preview: Frankie Drake Mysteries, “A Brother in Arms””

  1. “As part of the investigation, Wendy gives Frankie the backstory on Chinese immigrants, and Frankie Drake Mysteries‘ visual effects department does it in a unique way.”

    I thought this was well done. Too many shows push the point they’re trying to make into the foreground which makes it feel as though they are just doing lip service to it. But the director and writers made a really strong argument and did it in a subtle way, especially with that photo montage. That will stay with me.

    (This coming from a white middle-aged privileged male)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.