Everything about Alias Grace, eh?

2018 Directors Guild of Canada Awards winners announced

From a media release:

The DGC is delighted to announce the winners of the 2018 DGC Awards. There were over 350 submissions this year in both film and television from across the country.

The Awards were presented at the annual event on Saturday, October 20, 2018, at the Fairmont Royal York in Toronto. Headlined by Paul Sun-Hyung Lee (Kim’s Convenience) and directed by Charles Officer (Unarmed Verses, 21 Thunder), the evening demonstrated the excellent film & television productions that DGC members have brought to life. The event also highlighted special awards recipients, Norma Bailey, Alanis Obomsawin and Vic Sarin, veterans of the film industry.

DGC LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
Vic Sarin

DON HALDANE DISTINGUISHED SERVICE AWARD
Norma Bailey

DGC HONOURARY LIFE MEMBER AWARD
Alanis Obomsawin

OUTSTANDING DIRECTORIAL ACHIEVEMENT IN FEATURE FILM
Presented by Technicolor
Miranda de Pencier – The Grizzlies

ALLAN KING AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE IN DOCUMENTARY
Jennifer Baichwal – Long Time Running

BEST PICTURE EDITING – DOCUMENTARY
Roderick Deogrades – Silas

BEST SHORT FILM
Robin Hays – Post No Bills

DISCOVERY AWARD
Presented by Vanguarde Artists Management
Andrea Bussmann – Fausto

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN – FEATURE FILM
Paul Austerberry – The Shape of Water

BEST PICTURE EDITING – FEATURE FILM
Sidney Wolinsky – The Shape of Water

BEST SOUND EDITING – FEATURE FILM
The Shape of Water – Nathan Robitaille, Nelson Ferreira, Jill Purdy, Robert Hegedus, Kevin Howard, Alex Bullick, Dashen Naidoo, Tyler Whitham, Dustin Harris

OUTSTANDING DIRECTORIAL ACHIEVEMENT IN DRAMATIC SERIES
Presented by Panavision
Kari Skogland – The Handmaid’s Tale, Episode 110, Night

OUTSTANDING DIRECTORIAL ACHIEVEMENT IN MOVIES FOR TELEVISION AND MINI-SERIES
Presented by deluxe
Mary Harron – Alias Grace

OUTSTANDING DIRECTORIAL ACHIEVEMENT IN COMEDY SERIES
Presented by Sim
Yael Staav – Baroness Von Sketch Show, Episode 201, It Satisfies on a Very Basic Level

OUTSTANDING DIRECTORIAL ACHIEVEMENT IN FAMILY SERIES
Presented by William F. White
Bruce McDonald – Heartland, Episode 1110, A Fine Balance

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN – MOVIES FOR TELEVISION AND MINI-SERIES
Arvinder Greywal – Alias Grace

BEST PRODUCTION DESIGN – TELEVISION SERIES
Elisabeth Williams – Fargo, Episode 309, Aporia

BEST PICTURE EDITING – MOVIES FOR TELEVISION AND MINI-SERIES
David Wharnsby – Alias Grace 

BEST PICTURE EDITING – TELEVISION SERIES
Christopher Donaldson – The Handmaid’s Tale, Episode 102, Birth Day

BEST SOUND EDITING – MOVIES FOR TELEVISION AND MINI-SERIES
Cardinal: Blackfly Season – Paul Germann, Jane Tattersall, David McCallum, Krystin Hunter, Kelly McGahey

BEST SOUND EDITING – TELEVISION SERIES
The Expanse, Episode 205, Home – Nelson Ferreira, David Rose, Tyler Whitham, Dustin Harris, Dashen Naidoo

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Link: A look beneath the veil of Alias Grace’s showstopping hypnotism

From Sonia Saraiya of Vanity Fair:

Link: A look beneath the veil of Alias Grace’s showstopping hypnotism
“The veil is like the perfect image or metaphor for the whole show, because Grace is veiled—she’s partly obscured, she’s enigmatic, and you’re constantly trying to see the real self. So it was a beautiful image, in the end.” Continue reading.

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Links: Alias Grace

From Ben Lawrence of the Telegraph:

Link: Netflix’s Alias Grace is every bit the equal of The Handmaid’s Tale – review
And yet director Sarah Polley has managed to grasp Atwood’s challenging prose and create something that feels both obsessively faithful and cinematically ambitious. This production (now available in its entirety on Netflix) is literate film-making of the highest order. Continue reading.

From Julia Raeside of The Guardian:

Link: Alias Grace review – another poignant adaptation of a Margaret Atwood novel
Those craving another story of female oppression from Atwood’s estimable pen will do well to watch this six-part period drama. Writer and producer Sarah Polley has wanted to adapt Alias Grace since she was 17 and has clearly poured herself into the project. Atwood herself also acts as consulting producer. Continue reading. 

From Melanie McFarland of Salon:

Link: A different maid’s tale: The beautiful deceit of “Alias Grace”
Sarah Polley, produces and wrote the script for “Alias Grace” and she steeps the plot in such layers of mystery, prodding at our assumptions about its main subject and the place of women in that era. She and Harron also toy with popular expectations of how women are portrayed and comport themselves in period dramas. Initially, the story takes on a gentle tone, but soon flashes of violent assaults Grace sustains in the asylum hint at a darker truth. Continue reading.

From Kelly Connolly of Entertainment Weekly:

Link: Alias Grace is a true crime drama with the spirit of The Handmaid’s Tale 
As a lead, Gadon is electrifying, her quilting needle always one stab away from drawing blood. The show makes little attempt to age her across the decades, which does underplay the physical toll her traumatic experiences likely would have taken on her, but Alias Grace is better for being left in her hands. Gadon makes Grace magnetically interesting without losing sight of her unreliability as a narrator, the defining framework of Atwood’s novel. Continue reading. 

From Danielle Turchiano of Variety:

Link: Sarah Gadon Calls ‘Alias Grace’ the ‘Most Complicated, Intelligent’ Job She’s Ever Had
“As a character study, she’s fascinating. The way that Margaret writes her is very multi-dimensional. She doesn’t really commit to one narrative of the murder, and the show is trying to unwind her story. When I read the book I oscillated between all of these different ideas of who Grace was and what she was capable of doing, but I didn’t feel resolved in any of those.” Continue reading.

Link: ‘Alias Grace’ Team on the ‘Beautiful Mindf—’ of the Unconventional Female Protagonist
“What’s so delicious about Grace is she’s kind of like [raises her middle fingers] to the whole notion because maybe she did it and maybe she didn’t. She got punished but also she got set free. It’s a beautiful sort of mindf— as far as the conventions of female protagonists.” Continue reading. 

From Chelsea Tatham of Tampa Bay.com:

Link: Review: ‘Alias Grace’ a spellbinding tale of true crime and quiltmaking
Alias Grace is a remarkably complex portrait of a young servant girl who eventually becomes a “celebrated murderess.” The series quickly becomes more of an attempt to understand Grace beyond her titles of maid and murderess. Continue reading. 

From Nathan Now of KSDK:

Link: Review: Netflix’s Alias Grace is a harrowing and masterful journey
The series is superbly acted throughout, but no one outshines the stunning Gadon. Her Grace remains coy in the present and is emotionally laid bare in the past. The actress deftly seesaws between the young, naïve girl shown in flashbacks to the older, wizened prisoner accustomed to abuse and deception. Continue reading. 

From Stephen Parthimos of The Iris:

Link: Murder Mystery Alias Grace is a gripping character study
Sarah Gadon’s performance is phenomenal from start to finish. She commands the screen in every scene, delivers dialogue with much conviction, conveys drastic emotional highs and lows incredibly well, and right down to the subtleties of her character never once breaks formula. Continue reading.

From Phoebe Reilly of Rolling Stone:

Link: ‘Alias Grace’: How a True-Crime Drama Became the Most Relevant Show on TV
“My main objective was to track a woman’s journey through a man’s world where she’s endlessly harassed, abused – and expected to remain silent.” Continue reading.

From Katherine Cusumano of W Magazine:

Link: Alias Grace Star Sarah Gadon on Why Grace Marks’s Story Matters So Much Right Now
“The whole notion of exploring this woman who’s very repressed and everything that’s going on in her life has this kind of resonance because people aren’t thinking about their own repression or their own experiences with abuse and harassment privately—we’re thinking about women with this massive collective consciousness right now. It’s amplified the meaning of the show and I think it really is starting to strike a chord with people that goes beyond Grace’s story. It connects to their own story.” Continue reading.

From Adrian Hennigan of Haaretz.com:

Link: Netflix’s ‘Alias Grace’ Paints an Authentic World of Masters and Servants
I state with confidence that I will be breaking new journalistic ground with my next sentence: I have just watched two very good Canadian TV shows. I’ll start with the most prestigious: the six-part adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s 1996 novel “Alias Grace” (now available on Netflix). Continue reading.

 

 

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Alias Grace: Rebecca Liddiard previews Mary’s influence on Grace’s life

Rebecca Liddiard is taking over CBC one Monday night drama at a time. At least, it sure feels that way. The Toronto-based actress can be seen in Season 1 of Frankie Drake Mysteries, which just happens to debut after her run on Alias Grace is complete.

In Alias Grace, airing Mondays at 9 p.m., Liddiard portrays Mary Whitney, the lively housemaid who befriends Grace (Sarah Gadon) when the latter arrives at the home of Thomas Kinnear (Paul Gross) to work. Grace, who lived through hardship in Ireland and survived a horrible ocean crossing to Canada, views the Kinnear farm as heaven on earth and Mary as her best friend. At least, that’s the way Grace remembers it as she tells Dr. Simon Jordan (Edward Holcroft) the journey that led Grace to murder and incarceration at the Kingston Penitentiary.

In our latest exclusive interview, we chat with Liddiard about working on Sarah Polley’s adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s book and what’s to come later this season.

This is a spooky project. Anyone who has already read the book knows Mary appears to play a part in Grace’s actions. What is the relationship between these two women?
Rebecca Liddiard: Mary has also had an incredibly difficult life, just being part of this lower class, working in service, but she has lived through the Rebellions of 1837 and 1838 and her parents were very involved in it. She has this incredibly optimistic, idealistic view of the possibility of what her life could be. That lends herself to her incredible spirit that she tries to pass on to Grace. Mary gets caught up in life and her ending is just as tragic, but I think that spirit of something better and somehow transcending this life that they’re in sticks with Grace.

This is a speculative account of what’s going on in Grace’s mind, but I’m with you … I like to think Mary’s influence—if not her spirit—continues on with Grace as the rest of the story unfolds.

Mary passes away as a result of a medical issue. That must have been an intense scene to film.
Those scenes were the first ones I shot on Alias Grace and the first shots of the whole series!

How do you even prepare for that?
A lot of it is done in the moment. It was sort of a weird day. It was the beginning of the whole thing for everybody. We went to this house in the middle of the woods at Black Creek Pioneer Village and we filmed this scene. And, you just start screaming. It was really heavy.

The climax of the miniseries involves Mary as well, when Grace allegedly channels her during a hypnosis session.
Sarah [Gadon] and I talked a lot about that. How much is Mary still a part of the story at this point? I also did some recordings for Sarah reading her script in my voice so she could play around a bit. The effect is very terrifying. It’s incredible and chilling.

Alias Grace airs Mondays at 9 p.m. on CBC.

Image courtesy of CBC.

 

 

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Links: Alias Grace

From John Doyle of The Globe and Mail:

Link: Alias Grace: An ambitious, almost brilliant Margaret Atwood adaptation
Alias Grace (Monday, CBC, 9 p.m.) is tightly wound, stark and knowing about its central female protagonist. It is a very literary and at times elliptical adaptation, one that soars when it reaches into the elusive soul of Grace Marks (Sarah Gadon) and at times the six-part series hits you like a headache, it is so charged and sententious. It is sometimes gloriously exciting as Grace is revealed in oh-so-many twisted ways and, simultaneously, it suffers from the great curse of Canadian TV drama – it becomes visually inert when imaginative vigour and freshness of expression are called for. Continue reading.

From Victoria Ahearn of The Canadian Press:

Link: Alias Grace comes at a ‘critical moment,’ says star Sarah Gadon
Sarah Polley’s new TV adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s novel “Alias Grace” has been about 20 years in the making.

As it turns out, the timing couldn’t be more perfect.

Debuting Monday on CBC-TV and Nov. 3 on Netflix globally outside of Canada, the Ontario-shot miniseries comes after the smash success of another recent adaptation of Atwood’s work, eight-time Emmy winner “The Handmaid’s Tale.” Continue reading.

From Sonia Saraiya of Variety

Link: TV Review: Netflix’s ‘Alias Grace’ 
For a book that is essentially un-adaptable, though, “Alias Grace” presents a remarkably faithful and dazzlingly complex portrait of servant girl Grace Marks (Sarah Gadon), a real-life “celebrated murderess” who was found guilty and imprisoned, at 16, for the killing of her master and mistress. Continue reading. 

From Daniel Fienberg of The Hollywood Reporter:

Link: ’Alias Grace’: TV Review
Polley and Harron (and Atwood’s source material) represent a powerful and thoroughly in-synch writing-directing team, spinning six episodes of television out of a story that is, on its surface, barely a film’s worth of plot. Continue reading. 

From Courtney Shea of Toronto Life:

Link: Q&A: Sarah Gadon, the star of CBC’s new Atwood adaptation, Alias Grace
My agent sent me the script. When I saw it was a Sarah Polley project, I flipped out. Growing up in Toronto, I had always looked up to her as an actress, and I’ve watched her evolve into a director, producer and writer. I’ve always carried around a secret dream that maybe one day I might get to work with her.  Continue reading. 

From Hermione Wilson of The TV Junkies:

Link: Alias Grace: Why You’ll Want to Catch Margaret Atwood’s True Crime Novel as it Comes to TV
Making a Murderer had you hooked, and the first season of Serial made you wish you could read Adnan Syed’s mind, you’ll love Alias Grace! This latest TV adaptation of a Margaret Atwood novel (following close on the heels of the Emmy-winning The Handmaid’s Tale) is based on the true story of Canadian murderess — allegedly — Grace Marks, an Irish-Canadian maid who was convicted in 1843 of murdering her master Thomas Kinnear and his housekeeper Nancy Montgomery.  Continue reading.

 

 

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