Everything about Bellevue, eh?

Comments and queries for the week of May 26

I’m really sad about Bellevue being cancelled. A really good, quality show that deserved another season. It had great social media buzz during its run, but I guess it didn’t get enough TV eyeballs. —Kevin

How much were they spending on Pure? Ratings seemed decent for a midseason series. Sad, but not surprised about The Romeo Section. Anne renewal contingent on Netflix? —Jonathan

Yes, Netflix’s decision regarding a second season of Anne will have a direct impact on whether CBC renews it. You can read about that here.


I love Heartland and don’t want it to end. I was a bit disappointed in Season 10 when Ty came back; it was kind of rushed … Ty comes back, he’s sick and goes straight to the hospital with no time spent with Amy, and then Amy rushed off to the hospital to have the baby. I think the baby should have been left for a later season when Ty was back and they were more settled. Then Season 11 [could] have much more storyline coming up with them getting their own ranch or building on Heartland, then Ty getting his veterinary skills out there exploring more of the ranch than thinking about having a baby. Also, when Mallory left the show it was so poorly done she just on the spur of the moment leaves with no goodbyes or farewell just off to the airport without anyone even knowing she’s going? Tim also adds no value to the show … he is a spare part butting into everyone’s business. —Carol

[Heartland] is a breath of fresh air to watch. Nice clean programming with great storylines. I love it and all the characters! I hope Mitch is back for next season. —Valerie

Got a question or comment about Canadian TV? Email greg.david@tv-eh.com or via Twitter @tv_eh.

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TV Eh B Cs podcast 64 — Stage, silver screen and TV screen with Jane Maggs

Jane Maggs is a writer from Newfoundland living in Toronto. As a playwright, Jane has been produced in Toronto, Newfoundland and her work has been invited to be part of such workshops as the Banff Playwrights Colony and the Tarragon Theatre Playwrights Unit. Maggs is a 2011 screenwriting graduate of the Canadian Film Centre’s Feature Film program, and has been writing for film and TV ever since. She just completed the first season of the CBC drama Bellevue which she was co-creator, co-showrunner and writer of six episodes.

Jane is currently development on a couple of projects with her sister Adriana Maggs with Shaftesbury Films adapting the popular Aimée Leduc novel series for TV, and working on a half-hour comedy for CBC. Maggs’ feature Goalie that she also co-wrote with her sister is set for a fall 2017 production. Jane is also working on a couple of new project ideas with Adrienne Mitchell, with whom she created Bellevue.

Listen or download below, or subscribe via iTunes or any other podcast catcher with the TV, eh? podcast feed.

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Link: Jane Maggs and Adrienne Mitchell talk Bellevue S1 and the season finale

From Heather M of The Televixen:

Link: Jane Maggs and Adrienne Mitchell talk Bellevue S1 and the season finale
“Originally, and it might have been my own bleakness, I felt like Annie needed to let him go and run away, even though he’s done these terrible things. Despite that, she understands him. In another version, he needed to go away and get some help, but the cleaner version is that he has to die.” Continue reading.

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Link: Bellevue: Adrienne Mitchell and Jane Maggs talk “You Don’t Understand Me at All”

From Victoria Nelli of The TV Junkies:

Link: Bellevue: Adrienne Mitchell and Jane Maggs talk “You Don’t Understand Me at All”
“I think she has a lot to deal with. I don’t think we ever intended to present it like she killed somebody and now her demons are behind her. That’s not what happens when you shoot someone, regardless whether or not you are family. I think she has a lot to deal with. I think she’s going to try.” Continue reading. 

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Bellevue: “Love Hurts,” plus a chat with co-creator Jane Maggs

Spoiler alert! Do not read until you’ve watched Episode 8 of Bellevue

[Make sure to check out my chat with Bellevue co-creator Jane Maggs after this review.]

When we last met following last week’s episode of Bellevue, Brady (Billy MacLellan) lay dead across the hood of his truck and Annie (Anna Paquin) was handcuffed inside. Tonight, we find out it is Adam (Patrick Labbé) who saved his little sister. Adam “tried a different way to end the cycle” with Annie, whatever “cycle” means. So even though the man responsible for Jesse’s (Sadie O’Neil) murder is now dead, this final episode solves the Sandy Driver’s murder. We will also learn how that murder is connected to Jesse’s death. And finally, what everyone wants to know: what did Adam tell Peter in the confessional? It becomes Adam’s mission to close the story on Sandy Driver. No one yet understands, but Jane Maggs ties this all up with a great big bow for us.

Police arrive at the scene of the accident, and Peter (Shawn Doyle) confides to Annie he just wants Adam dead. Eddie (Allen Leech), fighting for his family and his relationship with Annie, arrives to take Annie home and tells her to just let it all go—for the sake their relationship and for the sake of Daisy (Madison Ferguson)— to just “walk away.”  But can she? Of course, she doesn’t. If she did, we would not have much of an ending!

Adam plays the Pied Piper and manages to capture his three little rats. First, he lures Tom (Vincent Leclerc) to the path in the woods with a recording of his daughter, and to his trap—literally. Once caught, Adam carves the name “Sandy” into Tom’s chest and leaves him to die … or not. Annie, Peter and Virginia (Sharon Taylor) reach him in time.

Annie and Peter decide to pay a visit to Maggie (Victoria Sanchez) for answers. Maggie reveals the four of them—Tom, Jameson (Joe Cobden) and Mother (Janine Theriault)—and she formed a blood pact in the old New Horizon’s shed. They all had their parts. Tom used the watch Maggie stole to lure Sandy to the woods, Jameson humiliated Sandy—he liked his girls dirty—and Mother did everything. “She planned it.”

Peter then ties the clue, “The lion has come to lay waste to the land,” to the waste that was thrown at Sandy. Adam is leading them to his victims. At the landfill we find Jameson, hanging from a crane, with the name Sandy carved in his forehead. Questioning of Jameson reveals that Lily locked Sandy in the shed because Sandy got the role of Mary, the role Lily felt was hers. “You didn’t take things from Lily back then.”

So now, where is Lily? There are no clues. Annie has the whole story. Lily is not meant to be found. Adam killed Sandy. So why is Adam leading Annie on this path? Because Annie needs to understand why he killed Sandy. Annie has the answer and now we also understand why her father killed himself. He didn’t do it because he couldn’t solve Sandy’s murder but rather because he did.

Sandy’s murder was the first clue, the clue Annie needs to solve in order to find Lily on time. Sandy was posed, pointing to town: “no sin; find me where there is none.” It is not original sin, but no sin. There was “no sin” in Sandy’s death. Adam needs for Annie to understand that Sandy’s death was merciful. And what happens to sit on Mercy Street? The brewery that Mother is trying to get up and running to bring jobs back to Bellevue.

The key players from the department converge on the brewery and discover first a dead lily, and then a crate hidden within piles of dirt. Hops? Barley? At any rate, Peter takes over the dig and reveals the wooden crate. He pries it open to discover Mother alive inside.

All right, so our main players involved in bringing Sandy to the point of wanting to die have been tortured and rescued, but that leaves Adam still out there, misunderstood. Annie still needs to understand. And how best to do so? Daisy. Adam goes to Annie’s while Daisy is home and Daisy lets him in—despite having seen the wall of creepy clues and pictures in her home—and Daisy gets to know her uncle.  She intimates she wishes she had an end to her project and Adam takes her to the forest to show her the ending.

Eddie, realizing Daisy is missing, freaks out and chases Annie down at the brewery. They go on a hunt to find Daisy and Adam in the woods where Peter joins them. Adam lays a trail, in keeping with his doll theme, to lead Annie to Daisy. Once found, Annie sends Daisy back to her father and talks with Adam. He explains that he just wanted Annie to understand how tortured he was to not be a part of things. How betrayed he felt by the actions of their father. And it was whilst in his rage that he discovered Sandy, locked in the shed. It was in Sandy he found someone who was living with just as much pain as he. Sandy’s death was a suicide pact but Adam ultimately could not follow through with that act.

Now, years later, he has come back to finally end the cycle and pretends to attempt to kill Annie, but tells her to “just do it.” Annie does, killing her own brother; finishing the cycle.

In the aftermath, Annie and Eddie pack up to move. Annie can finally leave the family home. And we see Danny (Cameron Roberts) sitting down with Maggie to share his movies of Jesse.  But wait, we still don’t know what Adam said to Peter…

“There is just one thing I would like to say before this all ends happily for you. You love her. You’ve loved her ever since she was a kid, and you have just been waiting and waiting for her to grow up. So you can just…” And that was so very evident on Peter’s face as Annie, Daisy and Eddie drove away.

I caught up with Jane Maggs and asked her to share some thoughts now that Bellevue Season 1 is complete.

First, How do you feel now that you see this come full circle, from project conception to tonight, completion?
Jane Maggs: I feel incredibly thankful for everyone who came together to make this thing that at one point was just a paragraph on a piece of paper. The calibre of people we had in every role was humbling to me daily.

And perhaps if you could share a memory from shooting the show that has not yet been shared, something that will, say 10 years from now still be with you?
On our last day of shooting I was late because I as doing some second unit stuff and I showed up (we were in a studio that day). I walked to the studio door and before I went in one of the crew members told me “Billy [MacLellan] is nailing it in there.” It was the day we were filming the stuff at the end of Episode 7 and he was nailing it. But I was struck mostly by the feeling of unity that our cast and crew felt, really part of something and proud and invested personally. That was underscored by the fact that I went in and there was cast there who were not even shooting that day but wanted to be around, support Billy, Anna, Sadie and Amber who were all shooting some intense stuff. It’s a day I won’t forget.

Well, that is all Bellevue-ites! No word as yet if there is a Season 2 somewhere in the future, but this has been a great ride! And thank you to Jane Maggs to take some time out of her day to touch base.

What did you think of Season 1 of Bellevue? Let us know in the comments below.

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