Tag Archives: Corus

Big Brother Canada donates Season 8 grand prize money to charities responding to COVID-19

From a media release:

In an emotional farewell episode for Season 8 of Big Brother Canada, Global and Insight Productions revealed tonight that, in light of an early end to production with no winner crowned, this season’s $100,000 grand prize will be donated to charities responding to COVID-19 via canadahelps.org.

Faced with unprecedented circumstances with regard to COVID-19, production on the season halted early last week under a provincial mandate for all non-essential businesses to close. In the season’s final episode tonight, the 12 remaining houseguests were informed about the decision, leaving them with one final night in the Big Brother Canada house before returning home.

Jointly, Global and Insight Productions conclude their superhero-themed season with an extended thanks to the real heroes of today – the frontline healthcare workers and first responders dedicating themselves to providing healthcare and emergency support during these challenging times.

At this time, Big Brother Canada Season 8 will not resume production at a later date. Stream this season and complete past seasons, along with digital exclusives, at www.bigbrothercanada.ca.

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Big Brother Canada Season 8 ends production amid Covid-19 pandemic

From a media release:

Global and Insight Productions announced today that, in light of developments in Ontario on the fight against COVID-19, effective today Big Brother Canada Season 8 has ended production.

Big Brother Canada is a labour of love for so many, and even though it hurts to say goodbye to the season, it’s the right thing to do,” said Big Brother Canada Host Arisa Cox. “On behalf of the incredible people who put this show together, thank you to everyone who started this journey with us. Please take care and be safe!”

At this time, Big Brother Canada has no plans to resume production at a later date. After a truly unprecedented season, the show will take its final bow over two episodes Wednesday, March 25 at 7 p.m. ET/PT and Wednesday, April 1 at 7 p.m. ET/PT.

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Salvage Kings reveals the treasures among trash found by Priestly Demolition Inc.

Residents of Toronto will recognize the name Priestly Demolition Inc. The company, which has been around since 1971, specializes in—among many other things—demolition and salvage services to the commercial, industrial, and institutional sectors of the construction industry in Ontario.

I’ve always wondered what goes on the sites marked by Priestly signs. Now, thanks to Salvage Kings, I know.

Debuting Sunday at 10 p.m. ET/PT on History, Salvage Kings—from Media Headquarters, the folks behind Canada’s Smartest Person and Tessa & Scott—gives the award-winning company and its staff a starring role. Priestly Demolition Inc. offers a one-two punch, going in and tearing down anything from a bridge, hospital, mall or industrial complex to an airport or even the CN Tower. But before the demolition can begin, salvaging anything of value happens first. That responsibility falls on Ted Finch, head of salvage, and his four-person team, who are tasked with collecting, sorting and then auctioning and selling items for a profit.

“From the time I was five or six years old, I’ve been interested in old stuff,” Finch says. “I would drag stuff home and refinish it. I’ve been going it my whole life. I’ve been an antique dealer and I’ve known Vic Priestly for 25 years. He just kept telling me to come and work for him.”

In Sunday’s first instalment, Ted and his team, including right-hand man Justin Fortin, descend on Market Village Mall in Markham, Ontario, where they are tasked with unlocking mysterious vault doors, while the demolition team begins its tear down. But while the vault and its mystery may be the big prize, there a lot of little ones collected along the way. Store signs can be sold by the letter, cooling and heating systems cut from ceilings for a profit, or medical equipment rolled away to be snapped up for cash by a feature film set decorator. As with anything in the collectable genre, I’m constantly surprised by what can be given a value … and the folks who are willing to pay for them.

“I like it when people get an appreciation for recycling and history and moving things forward and not just throwing it in the garbage,” Finch says. “There is a lot of waste in this society and it boggles my mind the stuff that people just throw out. It has a lot of life left in it.”

Salvage Kings airs Sundays at 10 p.m. ET/PT on History.

Image courtesy of Corus Entertainment.

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Global’s Mary Kills People checks in one final time

Back in 2017, Caroline Dhavernas was proud that the debate over doctor-assisted suicide would be the focal point of Mary Kills People. The Canadian government, at that time, has just deemed it legal with Bill C-14, thrusting Mary Kills People into the spotlight.

Now, with the final season of Global’s drama premiering this Sunday at 8 p.m. ET/PT on the network, Dhavernas is just as proud as she was when we first spoke about Tara Armstrong’s creation.

“Tara wrote this when she was in her late 20s, early 30s and I think it was a brave choice to tackle death and make it interesting and funny and sexy and thrilling and serious and dramatic and all that,” Dhavernas said, in the midst of a media day for the series. “When you go to a network with a subject that’s assisted dying, chances are they’re going to say to you, ‘It was nice to meet you, but no thanks.’ But she made it happen.”

In Sunday’s return, it’s been five months since the Season 2 finale. Mary (Dhavernas), Des (Richard Short) and Nicole (Charlotte Sullivan) are running a hospice, the perfect opportunity to help terminally-ill patients exit the world and not worry about the authorities catching them. Of course, before the hour is complete, things seem to be careening out of control. But rather than spoil it for you, just make sure you tune in. 

And, to prep you for Sunday, read our interview with Dhavernas.

Obviously, people are sad that the third season is going to be the last one, but I’m happy, and I think a lot of fans are, that we’re going to get closure. Have you all felt the same way?
Caroline Dhavernas: I was just dealing with the same thing while we were making Season 3. We knew it was going to be the end. So closure is indeed happening and, also, we get to tell the end of the story, which you don’t always get to do. We knew exactly what was happening and we got to say goodbye properly and end the show on our terms, so it’s quite empowering.

I’ve seen the first episode and we’re thrown quite the twist. I guess it should have been a little bit expected because this is Mary Kills People, but it’s a great way to jump back into Season 3.
CD: Yeah, I didn’t see it coming when I read it the first time. I was surprised by what happened and I thought the same thing, ‘I should have known because this is what I do on this show.’ For some reason, because it was about faith and because of her new life I thought, ‘What’s happening? Is she grappling with religion, but no.’

It looks as though this final season is going to be full of twists and turns.
CD: Every episode of this show is quite dense with action and emotion and Season 3 is going to be the same. And it’s a little more character driven, though, this season. Season 2 was really crazy, like the criminal world with Olivia and I think that will have been the season where we dive into the illegal aspect of what she’s doing the most. It’s an exciting season because also it takes place in winter for the first time, so the visuals are quite different and also water has always been an underlying theme on the show and now water has frozen over and it just brings another mood to the series.

I love the atmospheric stuff when you’re working with the seasons because it really adds character to the show and is actually like a member of the cast in telling the story.
CD: I think it forced us to rethink certain aspects of the show. And this happened because I was pregnant last summer and we couldn’t shoot so we were forced to reinvent a little bit, so it’s interesting.

Were you happy with the way that the show ended? Do you think that fans are going to be happy with the series finale?
CD: I think so because we care for these characters and we want them to know that they’ll be OK when we leave them forever. And I think you’ll certainly get a sense of that happening towards the end. It’s been very dense and very stressful at times, what they’re going through. And I’m not going to tell you how it ends, but certain characters will finally be able to calm down a little bit.

What are you most proud of being involved in this show? For me, it’s just the fact that assisted death has been brought to the forefront and is part of the discussion. What about for you?
CD: Yeah, I think it’s a very brave subject matter to tackle, especially from such a young woman’s point of view. Tara wrote this when she was in her late 20s, early 30s and I think it was a brave choice to tackle death and make it interesting and funny and sexy and thrilling and serious and dramatic and all that. Because when you go to a network with a subject that’s assisted dying, chances are they’re going to say to you, ‘It was nice to meet you, but no thanks.’ But she made it happen. It was a bit of a coincidence that the law was changing in Canada in the summer that we decided to shoot. It was kind of in the air for some reason and she made it work and the tone is quite unique, and that’s one of the other things that I’m quite proud of, being part of that uniqueness.

Last question. Did you take any mementoes from your time at Mary Kills People?
CD: Yes, actually I kept some of Mary’s clothes and … a medallion from the goddess of death, an Egyptian goddess, I think. I’m very happy to have been able to keep that.

Mary Kills People airs Sundays at 8 p.m. ET/PT on Global.

Images courtesy of Corus.

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail