Tag Archives: History

History starts production on Canadian original docu-series Breaking Wild

From a media release:

Corus Entertainment’s HISTORY® in association with Breakthrough Entertainment and Bonterra Productions announce the start of production on the new Canadian-original series Breaking Wild (10×60). The doc-series follows the efforts of fearless indigenous cowboys in B.C.’s pristine Nemiah Valley as they fight together for the survival of wild Qayus horses who roam in their midst. Breaking Wild is currently slated to premiere in Winter 2020 on HISTORY.

Set in the sprawling and secluded paradise of the B.C. interior, the Nemiah Valley is part of the Xeni Gwet’in’s 1700 square kilometers of title lands and home to a growing herd of as many as 1,000 Qayus. These wild horses are among the smartest, strongest, and rarest on the planet. Under the direction of current Chief Jimmy Lulua, the Xeni Gwet’in cowboys continue to draw upon centuries of experience managing the Qayus. Elite competitive rodeo riders including Howard Lulua, Amanda Lulua and Emery Phillips work alongside trusted outsiders and legendary horse trainers Roy Mulvahill and Mike Hawkridge, as well as transplanted American Naval Officer Michael Lares. Together they work to protect the herd from over population, scarcity of resources, and natural predators. Through a multi-camera approach, production of the series provides access to the rarely seen, high-octane lives of modern cowboys. Capturing stories about the unbreakable bond between human and horse as they streak across sweeping plains and over snowcapped mountain peaks.

Breaking Wild is produced in accordance with the Xeni Gwet’in First Nations Government Filming Protocol. The Xeni Gwet’in have appointed community advisers who ensure the cultures, practices, and beliefs of the Xeni Gwet’in are accurately portrayed.

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Link: Vikings’ Alexander Ludwig on why Bjorn’s dark season is his favourite one yet

From Bridget Liszewski of The TV Junkies:

Link: Vikings’ Alexander Ludwig on why Bjorn’s dark season is his favourite one yet
“Bjorn has totally been displaced. They are all homeless and incredibly angry. It’s definitely gotten past the point of no return and it’s become incredibly personal. This season, in particular, is about Bjorn fighting for everything he was brought up to believe in.” Continue reading.

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Preview: History recognizes Remembrance Day with superior 100 Days to Victory

I’m a bit of a history buff, particularly when it comes to the First and Second World Wars. I’ve watched dozens of documentaries, miniseries and films, and have visited sites of battles in France. I thought I knew almost everything. Not even close.

Airing on Remembrance Day on History, 100 Days to Victory unveiled two hours of material I’d read scant details about. Produced by Bristow Global Media and Electric Media in association with Corus Entertainment’s History and narrated by Peter Outerbridge, 100 Days to Victory—broadcast Sunday, Nov. 11, at 9 and 10 p.m. ET/PT on the specialty channel—tracks the final 100 days in the First World War. The program is a stunning achievement in television, combining words from historians and recreations of crucial battles to tell the story of Canada’s important role in the conflagration.

The opening minutes set the scene. It’s early 1918 on the Western Front and German forces are making a final push to crush the Allies and win the war. French Marshal Ferdinand Foch and British Field Marshal Douglas Haig, desperate for a victory, turn to Canadian General Arthur Currie and Australian General John Monash for advice. Between them, the pair devises a brash and ingenious plan to rout the enemy using a combination of forces in a whole new way.

Along the journey, the producers introduce the background of each of the four military leaders; where they came from, their military backgrounds and personalities. And, using actual letters and diary entries written by military leaders and everyday soldiers in the trenches, the program provides a well-rounded description of what was happening and going through everyone’s minds. Historians like Dr. Tim Cook of the Canadian War Museum, Prof. Elaine McFarland, Patrick Watt and Mat McLachlan offer a detailed play-by-play of each battlefield move.

In the second instalment, Allied forces smash through Germany’s impregnable Hindenburg Line—a five-trench, fortified, 600-kilometre horror bristling with barbed wire, machine guns and booby traps—with daring Canadian Corps advances planned by Currie.

Remembrance Day, for me, is a time of reflection. And, by watching programs like 100 Days to Victory, I’m able to put myself in the shoes of Canadians who fought to defend this country and salute them.

100 Days to Victory airs Sunday, Nov. 11, at 9 and 10 p.m. ET/PT on History.

Images courtesy of Corus Entertainment.

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Preview: History’s doc series Bud Empire rolls up on pot sales as Canada heads toward legalization

I don’t—and have never—smoked marijuana. Growing up, I didn’t know anyone who did and when it was offered I declined. As a result, I don’t have any skin in the game as Canada inches closer to the legalization—voting on Bill C-45 is scheduled for June —of recreational marijuana in this country. But tuning in to History’s latest original series, Bud Empire certainly educated me in the drug and what being able to sell it as an entrepreneur.

Debuting Tuesday at 10 p.m. ET/PT on the specialty network, the seven-part Bud Empire—narrated by Will Sasso—introduces viewers to Bob Kay, the owner of Be Kind, the Okanagan’s original Compassion Club. Episode 1, with its guitar-driven soundtrack, introduces Kay as he reveals B.C.’s Okanagan Valley is dotted with pot grow-ops mixed in with other crops. It’s a $5 billion industry and Kay aims to be “the King of Weed.” That title comes with challenges in the form of robbery, extortion, violence and Kay potentially being arrested for selling.

But Bud Empire isn’t about the furtive exchange of money for pot in a shadowy alley or groups of stoners lounging in a room filled with smoke; the program explores not only Kay’s family life (including his creatively-named kids) but how he’s running and, hopefully, expanding his business. This could be a series about any entrepreneur wanting to sell a product; the hook is that Kay sells marijuana. Kay welcomes salespeople into Be Kind, analyzing and sampling their weed and deeming if it’s up to his high standards and worthy of being in his store. Watching bunches of twenties exchange hands over bags of pot is certainly something to see.

Kay works a grey area of the law but he believes what he and others are doing is really helping; medical marijuana helps alleviate chronic pain and other ailments. Still, rules in Kelowna, B.C., could put him out of business and in jail.

Produced by Screen Siren Pictures Inc. and HLP + Partners, Trish Dolman (Canada in a Day)—Bud Empire‘s executive producer and director—offers a wonderful, educational and heartfelt peek into the life of man eking out a business in a rapidly-changing landscape.

Bud Empire airs back-to-back episodes on Tuesdays at 10 p.m. ET/PT on History.

Image courtesy of Corus Entertainment.

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