Tag Archives: Orphan Black

Will Pascoe announced as showrunner in residence for the Pacific Screenwriting Program’s 2021 Scripted Series Lab

From a media release:

The Pacific Screenwriting Program (PSP) is excited to announce that award-winning Writer/Producer/Director Will Pascoe will serve as Showrunner-in-Residence for the 2021 Scripted Series Lab. Pascoe will mentor six up-and-coming BC-based screenwriters selected to participate in the program. He will lead the Writer’s Room as they develop his original series in the PSP’s flagship training program starting in January.

Going into its third year, the lab will implement a hybrid-style Writer’s Room combining in-person and virtual meetings that reflect the current production protocols due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants will still get the full PSP experience including mentoring on their original pilot, additional workshops and information sessions with other industry leaders to equip them with the skills, experience and connections necessary to help establish a sustainable career in the province’s dynamic screen industry. The Pacific Screenwriting Program is a collaboration between Netflix, CMPA, the Writer’s Guild of Canada and Creative BC.

Will Pascoe most recently wrapped Showrunning the third season of Amazon’s hit series, Absentia. Previous to that, he wrote for Fox’s The Finder, Bell/SyFy Channel’s, Bitten; NBC’s drama series Chicago Med; BBC Worldwide/Starz’s Da Vinci’s Demons and Hulu’s Shut Eye starring Jeffrey Donovan and Isabella Rossellini. While working as writer and co-producer on Bell/BBC America’s Orphan Black, his episode “Variations Under Domestication” earned Pascoe a Canadian Writer’s Guild Award and nominations for an Edgar Allan Poe Award and a Hugo Award. A graduate of the Writer’s Guild of America’s prestigious Showrunner Training Program, Will has also developed television series for Twentieth-Century Fox, Playtone, and Universal Studios.

The Scripted Series Lab is a 15-week intensive training program providing support and career-advancement opportunities for active and aspiring screenwriters from across British Columbia, where they receive the necessary support to expand their portfolio and pursue opportunities in the evolving TV marketplace. Throughout the program, participants hone their craft, strengthen their collaboration and presentation skills, and obtain a deeper understanding of the global television industry and how to market themselves within it. As the Scripted Series Lab showrunner, Pascoe will mentor the six selected participants within a real-world story room over 10 weeks, breaking stories and writing scripts for the original project he brings to the room and will subsequently be pitching to streamers and networks around the world.

For more information, please visit the Pacific Screenwriting Program website.

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Preview: Murdoch Mysteries goes in for surgery in “Operation: Murder”

And just like that, we’re off and running with a new season of Murdoch Mysteries. In last week’s return, we met architect Frank Lloyd Wright and saw the deadly consequences of being inside William’s potato cooking room when you’re not a potato. If you haven’t done so already, read my interview with showrunner Peter Mitchell, who gives some background on how the house came together.

Now, on to Episode 2. Here’s what the CBC has released as the official storyline for “Operation: Murder,” written by Mary Pedersen and directed by Harvey Crossland:

Ogden enlists Murdoch to investigate possible sabotage in the operating room after a patient dies during a routine medical procedure.

And, as always, some non-spoilery details after watching the screener.

Orphan Black‘s Kathryn Alexandre appears in an important role
After playing Tatiana Maslany’s body double for five seasons, Kathryn Alexandre steps into the spotlight in a fun role: Florence Nightingale Graham, the businesswoman who founded Elizabeth Arden, Inc. Florence and George enjoy quite the romp on Monday night and it leads to a very, very funny scene.

Julia’s storyline is anything but funny
While George is getting goop on his face, Julia is dealing with tragedy at the University of Toronto School of Medicine. Veteran actor James McGowan is Doctor Forbes, who encourages Julia to perform surgery on a patient. Stephanie Belding returns to Murdoch Mysteries for a third stint, this time as Nurse Sullivan, a key witness in a patient’s death. Sebastian Pigott, most recently seen on Wynonna Earp this year and Frankie Drake Mysteries last year, is Dr. Dixon, a fellow student of Julia’s and none too happy she’s smarter than him.

Oh, that house
I’m glad all the work the crew did on the Frank Lloyd Wright home set is being used in more than one episode. It serves as the backdrop for William’s latest scientific gadget.

Murdoch Mysteries airs Mondays at 8 p.m. on CBC.

Images courtesy of CBC.

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Link: 10 years ago, ‘Flashpoint’ opened the door For ‘Wynonna Earp,’ ‘Orphan Black’ and ‘Travelers’

From Merrill Barr of Forbes:

Link: 10 years ago, ‘Flashpoint’ opened the door For ‘Wynonna Earp,’ ‘Orphan Black’ and ‘Travelers’
In the summer of 2008, amidst the fallout of a damaging writers strike in the first half of the year, America broadcast networks were desperate for content. For CBS, one solution ended up coming from a strange place: Canada. What resulted from an unassuming find meant to just fill time was a series that would break the door down for shows such as Orphan Black and Wynonna Earp to thrive a decade later. That find? Flashpoint. Continue reading.

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail

Jerry O’Connell solves crimes in Bravo’s lighthearted Carter

If North Bay, Ont.’s tourism board is looking for a spokesperson, they should sign up Jerry O’Connell. The veteran actor of such series as The Defenders and Sliders speaks glowingly—and extensively—while discussing his next project, the Canadian original crime series Carter, debuting Tuesday at 8 p.m. ET on Bravo.

“It’s a truly Canadian show,” O’Connell says on the line from London, England, where he’s shopping Carter worldwide for Sony Pictures Television. “I’ve worked on a lot of shows in Canada that have pretended to be San Francisco, painted out the Canadian flag and handled American money, but here they actually frame the Canadian flag and we actually use loonies and twonies. I feel like I’m a real ambassador for North Bay at this point.”

The project, created by Garry Campbell (The Kids in the Hall, Todd and the Book of Pure Evil) was filmed in the northern Ontario city—as was fellow Bell Media series Cardinal—and focuses on Harley Carter (O’Connell), an affable Canadian lad who made it big as a detective on the hottest cop show on American television. After a much-publicized meltdown, Harley has returned to his hometown of Bishop, Ont., where he reconnects with childhood friends Sam Shaw (Sydney Poitier-Heartsong) and Dave Leigh (Kristian Bruun). Sam, a veteran cop, quickly finds Harley inserting himself into her investigations while coffee truck owner Dave serves as Harley’s unofficial driver and wingman in some outrageous schemes. Unlike the dark, brooding of Cardinal, Carter is much more lighthearted, especially when Harley and Dave are bumbling their way through a plan to get information on a suspect. And, thanks for Harley’s years of playing a cop on television, he actually helps with investigations, much to Sam’s chagrin.

“I lived in L.A. for about 10 years and had a lot of Canadian friends there and I watched what it did to people,” Campbell says of the genesis of Carter. “You have enough people telling you, ‘You’re a star and everything should revolve around you,’ and you start to believe it. It changes people. I was fascinated with the idea of this Canadian boy who always had this idealized version of what Hollywood was in his head. The procedural element of the show is just gravy. I wanted to deal with a guy who gets away from his roots.”

Harley is far from his roots when viewers tune in to the debut instalment. Harley is basking in being recognized on the beach in Bishop when Sam appears and an awkward reunion follows. But when Harley’s housekeeper-turned guardian of 30 years is accused of murder (check out a photo gallery of Carter‘s cast, including Wynonna Earp‘s Varun Saranga) Harley demands he be included in the investigation. Yes, Harley is somewhat cocky, but what Campbell and his writing team of Larry Bambrick, Jenn Engels and Wil Zmak have created is someone immensely likeable. O’Connell, so long a co-star on series where he’s not the main man, steps into that role and owns it. The chemistry between he, Poiter-Heartsong and Bruun is palpable, especially in one key scene where the characters are relaxing in Muskoka chairs, sipping beer and recalling the old days.

“That was the moment, of all the moments when we kind of said, ‘Oh, we’re doing it. This thing is going to work,'” Campbell recalls. “We cast well. Those guys are amazing. And they’re just decent human beings and it shines through.”

Carter airs Tuesdays at 8 p.m. ET on Bravo.

Images courtesy of Bell Media.

Facebooktwitterredditlinkedinmail