Tag Archives: Bitten

Frontier’s Greg Bryk on Cobb Pond’s Season 2 journey and how Paul Gross saved his life

Fifteen years ago, Paul Gross saved Greg Bryk’s life. I was on the phone with Bryk to talk about Season 2 of Frontier—Discovery’s historical drama about the history of the Canadian fur trade returning Wednesday at 10 p.m. ET/7 p.m. PT—when I mentioned Men with Brooms came out 15 years ago.

“He saved my life,” Bryk says of Gross, who wrote, starred and directed the feature film. “I was going to go to law school. I had babies and I couldn’t pay any bills and I was walking away from it all. And then he cast me in Men with Brooms and threw me a lifeline. He was incredibly generous with his time and was kind of the rogueish older brother that I never had.”

The role of Alexander “The Juggernaut” Yount was the first of many, many memorable characters Bryk has played over the year. Whether it’s alpha werewolf Jeremy Danvers on Bitten, the Jack of Knives on Wynonna Earp or Grady on Mary Kills People, Bryk has amassed an IMDB page packed with memorable characters. We spoke to Bryk about his acting choices and what’s to come for Cobbs Pond, business associate/lover to Montreal businessman Samuel Grant (Shawn Doyle), in Season 2 of Frontier.

They say that the clothes make the man. Is that true for Cobbs Pond?
Greg Bryk: He has the best wardrobe. The best. When [series creators] Rob Blackie and Peter Blackie approached me, they had another character they were interested in me for. I was under option for Bitten at the time and that part was recast. A few weeks later, Bitten was cancelled and I was no longer under option. Rob called me, and I remember being in a parking lot in the Distillery District [of Toronto]. ‘Greg, hear me out on this. We have a character. So far we haven’t written a line for him yet. We have no idea what he could become or will become. He’s a cross between this real-life assassin-gunfighter that exists—historically from Boston—and Oscar Wilde.’ I’m like, ‘Done. Let’s have an adventure.’

We literally created this character from scratch and when I first walked in and I saw the fox hat. When [costume designer] Michael [Ground] handed me the hat I had everything I needed to know about this character. There is such a playful malevolence about him and the idea of sexuality and femininity and being placed in that historical context but to be this completely complicated and contemporary man, in a lot of ways, was a fascinating adventure. We found moments throughout Season 1—some dark, horrific moments and moments of real longing and being lost—and that arc/descent accelerates during Season 2. Cobbs goes to some places that I was so thrilled to get to be able to take him and really explore what love means to this character, what loyalty means, what ambition means, what greed means, what savage revenge means … all the while spinning in the most beautiful clothes one could ever hope to dress themselves in.


“When the lights go up and the camera goes on, it’s like a cage opens and the lion hunts the zoo.”


It sounds like you personally had a hand in creating Cobbs.
They fleshed the character out in very broad strokes and allowed me to bring so much of myself to the character. I’m really lucky in that a lot of directors and showrunners that I have worked with trust me to personalize the work and bring elements of myself to the character. There are things this year that happen with Cobbs and parts of monologues that are straight camera roll and they just let me go into myself. There are a couple of scenes which are shocking and brutal and violent but also incredibly vulnerable. It’s me transferring an experience I had being in love with this girl when I was in Grade 5—that first love—and they let me drag Cobbs into my longings and my wants and my vulnerabilities. But, also, this strength emerges in Cobbs this year where he is a force to be reckoned with.

There are some moments that are absolutely crazy. There are places Cobbs goes that I think the audience—who enjoyed him in the first season as this glitter who was thrown into a very dark world—will be slack-jawed at some of the things that will happen. He’s quite, delightfully, mad.

You’ve created memorable characters throughout your acting career. Where does that come from?
I’m a very cautious, almost timid, person in real life. I like routine. I stay in my house with my kids and my wife and my dogs. I literally walk the same path every day and I like that. In the real world, I like to control as much as I can. But in my work, it’s the chaos, man. I’m fearless. There is nothing I won’t reveal about myself or someone else and I don’t ever apologize for anything that I do. I am utterly without censure when the cameras roll and I think it saves my life. I became a father in theatre school and I had to learn to compartmentalize. Discovering myself as an artist was walking in step with being a husband and a father. There have always been these parallel tracks. I can happily live away from that live wire in the middle, but goddamn it I love to dance on it. When the lights go up and the camera goes on, it’s like a cage opens and the lion hunts the zoo.

Frontier airs Wednesdays at 10 p.m. ET/7 p.m. PT on Discovery.

Images courtesy of Bell Media.

 

 

 

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Bitten and Wynonna Earp stars check in to Saving Hope

We were excited to see what Greg Bryk’s character would bring to Saving Hope when Erica Durance gave us the scoop on his storyline earlier this year.

“It was a little bit of a departure because he brought a little more danger to the episode and to Alex,” she told us last month. “She has to track this guy down and he’s in the witness protection program, and she has to try and convince him to save his son. Again, danger, and some comedy and a heartrending story. Greg is such a lovely actor.”

Not only does Bryk guest-star in Sunday’s new episode, “Tested and Tried,” but so does Wynonna Earp‘s Kate Drummond (listen to our interview with her from last summer). Here’s CTV’s official synopsis about the episode:

With a patient in desperate need of a liver transplant and no other options, Dr. Alex Reid (Erica Durance) is forced to track down the boy’s father Danny (Greg Bryk, BITTEN) who is in witness protection. As the new CEO, Thomas Leffering (Joe Dinicol, BLINDSPOT), sets out to make his mark on Hope Zion Hospital, he puts a moratorium on expensive transplant surgeries which puts him at odds with a defiant Dr. Dawn Bell (Michelle Nolden). As the cuts from Thomas continue, Dr. Zach Miller (Benjamin Ayres) sets out to have a perfect day in the E.R. only to be faced with trials of biblical proportions. 

And here are some non-spoilery facts we can reveal after watching a screener!

A new story angle
Durance wasn’t kidding when she said tonight’s story was a departure for Saving Hope. The writers have gone all-in for Season 5 and Bryk and Drummond are a huge part of it. Alex has been showing her more daring side of late—hello, motorcycle—and that continues on Sunday. Drummond is so unlike Agent Lucado—which makes sense, she is an actress after all—and fans are going to love seeing her sensitive side.

Dawn on the warpath
“Defiant” is the word the network used in their synopsis to describe Dawn this week. We prefer “mad as hell,” and Thomas is in her sights, especially after he recalls the downfall of civilization on Easter Island.

Charlie vs. Alex
Remember when I wrote about how nice it was to see Alex and Charlie getting along for Luke’s sake. Yeah, that goes to hell on Sunday. In a big way.

The ER goes to the dogs
Literally.

Saving Hope airs Sundays at 10 p.m. ET/PT on CTV.

Images courtesy of Bell Media.

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Comments and queries for the week of April 22

Bitten says goodbye

Jeremy getting stabbed in the eye is not enough justice for Karen being murdered in cold blood by that SOB (literally). He should be given up to humans by the pack and pay for his crime (since they have now outed themselves). I did not like the ending. I mean, werewolves and humans living in harmony … puhleeeze. Unrealistic and contrived conclusion. Watch Wolfblood, which is essentially a CBBC series for juveniles but is more coherent. —Keith

All I have to say is I’m sad a great show like Bitten, their storylines and most of all the actors will not have a next season. —Lori

I wanted Nick with Paige, his ending upset me! —TanyaLeigh

Damn, that was a good finale. It makes me want to watch the series all over again. —Kimberly

I am very sad to see this series end. I do hope you can put out some new series to let us know what going on with the witches. —Lorie

 

Got a question of comment about Canadian TV? greg@tv-eh.com or via Twitter @tv_eh.

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Link: Bitten postmortem: Elena finds her place

From Bridget Liszewski of The TV Junkies:

Bitten postmortem: Elena finds her place
“Elena has been trying to find her place since Day 1, and we’ve rattled that cage across three seasons. It’s the series arc for that character, and we’ve seen her grow into her Alpha position from early on in the first season (starting with Logan suggesting she’d be the best fit). We wouldn’t have been able to wrap this series out in a satisfying way if Elena hadn’t found that acceptance.” Continue reading. 

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Bitten says goodbye

It’s always hard to say goodbye to a television show, especially one like Bitten. Far from stale, Season 3 felt like a bit of a rebirth for the show, and a move in a bold new direction. That’s certainly the case for Friday’s series finale “Truth, Changes, Everything.” Written by Daegan Fryklind, the script does close out stories, but leaves others wide open for interpretation and the imagination. Yes, there have been dark moments for several of these characters over the last three seasons, but by the end of “Truth, Changes, Everything,” I definitely felt hope.

Here’s what’s in store for Jeremy, Elena, Clay, Nick, Rachel, Paige, Sasha, Alexei, The Albino and Konstantin moving forward.

“Truth, Changes, Everything”
The episode title has a wonderful double meaning to it, referring both to how the truth literally changes everything and the storylines deal with truth, changes and, well, everything. Fryklind is a damned wordsmith and I love it.

Things start slow
The first 20 minutes are prep and posturing. Then the wheels really start to move and there’s no let-up. The next 22 minutes sped by faster than a wolf chasing down prey.

Bitten2

Elena’s dream is realized
“We’re the outlaws now. It’s time to embrace our fate. This won’t stop until it happens, so let it come.” With those words, Elena makes a decision, putting irreversible steps in motion that can’t be stopped. Whether or not those steps were the right move will have fans talking for awhile.

Not everyone survives
It would be silly to assume everyone emerges from “Truth, Changes, Everything” unscathed—Bitten is a series about werewolves, blood and witches, after all—so place your bets on who will, and won’t, survive the final showdown. I can say those who do perish don’t do so in vain and are given the proper sendoff.

Bitten‘s series finale airs Friday at 10 p.m. ET on Space.

Let me know what you think of Bitten‘s series finale!

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