Everything about Web series, eh?

Link: Now on Facebook: Chateau Laurier is a 10-minute, perfect Canadian drama with familiar themes

From John Doyle of The Globe and Mail:

Link: Now on Facebook: Chateau Laurier is a 10-minute, perfect Canadian drama with familiar themes
Set in the famous Ottawa hotel, but filmed in Toronto – it looks like the Fairmont Royal York – events are set in or about 1912. A young woman, Hattie Bracebridge (Kate Ross) is brought to the hotel on the eve of her arranged marriage to one Vivian Mutchmor (Luke Humphrey). Her chaperone, Mrs. Bracebridge (Fiona Reid), tells Hattie to quit her complaining and face up to the marriage. Hattie wanders off and has a little romantic adventure. Then, there’s a twist. Continue reading.

 

 

 

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Season 2 of CBC’s My 90-Year-Old Roommate begins streaming April 26

From a media release:

As Canadian rent prices skyrocket, what’s a young adult to do? CBC’s smash-hit My 90-Year-Old Roommate (MNYOR) provides one solution: move in with your grandpa. Season 2 of this Canadian Screen Award-winning comedy series starring Paul Soles and Ethan Cole, will begin streaming at cbc.ca/watch and the CBC TV App on April 26.

A no-holds-barred dark comedy rooted in family and set in the madness of the modern world, MNYOR is an exploration of technology, mortality and relationships told through the eyes of two generations, once removed. A true coming together of generations, the series is written by Ethan Cole, David Lipson and Josh Shultz, who were joined by Ethan’s 92-year-old grandfather, Joe Cole, as a contributing writer.

MNYOR is based on the viral web series starring Ethan and Joe Cole, Explaining Things to My Grandfather, which has garnered more than 3 million views on YouTube.

Season two promises to deliver even more laughs and discomfort as viewers see Ethan and his grandfather Joe live-stream funerals, go on elderly bachelor parties, explore the perils of self-diagnosis via online symptom checkers, and so much more. Season two will also see guest appearances from Verne Troyer (Austin Powers) and online influencers Matthew Santoro and Azzy of the Youtube channel “Azzyland”, who have 6 million and 4 million YouTube subscribers, respectively.

Season two (12 x 10) is executive produced by Lauren Corber (LoCo Motion Pictures), Ethan Cole, Josh Shultz, David Lipson and Jason Kennedy. Geoff LaPaire serves as Producer.

Viewers can catch up on Season 1 at cbc.ca/watch.

 

 

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Detention Adventure and The Communist’s Daughter among web series selected for IPF funding

From a media release:

The Independent Production Fund and its 40-member Pre-Selection Committee have selected 30 projects which are now eligible to advance to Phase 2 of the application process and apply for Production financing. These include 20 projects in English and 10 in French. Four web series previously funded by the IPF are eligible to apply for funding for second or subsequent seasons.

The IPF received 170 proposals for web series funding from across Canada, in English and in French. Applications included 2-minute proof-of-concept trailers, creative material and audience engagement strategies. Development opportunities for new talent and mentorship by experienced creative and business web series professionals were evaluation factors. All of these criteria were reviewed, scored and discussed by the Pre-Selection Committee members, who are industry professionals and advanced media students.

Producers of the selected shortlisted projects are now invited to submit complete Production Applications by May 1, 2018.  An international Jury will evaluate these proposals and the Board of Directors of the IPF will make final funding decisions in June.

“The 2018 “IPF Trailer Season” as dubbed by the industry, has exposed online viewers to great Canadian talents and teased them with terrific stories that have been watched, liked and shared by hundreds of thousands of fans during the past month.  “Our Canadian production community is certainly not lacking in imagination and diversity” noted Andra Sheffer, CEO of the IPF. “ The efforts that have gone into creating the content and engaging audiences will ideally provide invaluable feedback to all those who have participated in this process.” Continue reading for a list of the projects receiving funding.

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Web series Learning Nature with Chris Locke is balls-out hilarity with an edge

You might, as I did after watching two episodes of Learning Nature with Chris Locke, think it’s a one-note web series. The tale of a pudgy man named Chris who casts the cruel, unfeeling big city away for the embrace of nature … but has no real clue how wild the wild truly is.

But to watch all eight webisodes of Learning Nature with Chris Locke—available on Funny or Die now—is to see a man enamoured with trees, rocks, the sky, birds, worms and water but having no real knowledge of them and left struggling to survive. Locke, a hilarious stand-up comic who has also appeared in episodes of Mr. D, Baroness Von Sketch Show and The Beaverton, teamed with longtime collaborator Derek Horn to create the eight-part opus.

“People watch the first episode and say, ‘I get it, web humour,'” Locke says over the phone. “But stick with it and you will see my butt.” While Horn (who has worked with Locke on such projects as Hello, What? and Kelly 5-9) directed, edited, lit and worried about the budgets for Learning Nature, Locke established the character, a friendly shlub who aims to educate viewers on facts regarding a plethora of things you see in nature.

The first instalment of the iThentic production, “Trees,” features Chris welcoming us into a lush forest for his first-ever documentary. Chris is super-enthusiastic as he hugs a nearby tree he dubs one of “the mighty tall giants of the woods.” He expounds on their multiple uses, including making paper out of them, building log cabins … or creating a wooden sword to practice fighting with. The hilarity and oddness of Learning Nature are in camera angles lingering a little too long, unsure footing and Chris’ meandering patter. He knows a little too little about nature as it turns out, leading to uncomfortable facts about his personal life being revealed. It’s a character Locke has been perfecting for years.

“I’ve been making shorts since 2005 or 2006,” Locke says. “And I’ve always been honing that kind of guy. A dumb, worried, idealistic weirdo. It was always in the back of our minds that if you like our brand this is what it is if we had freedom.” The duo—along with friend/production assistant/spiritual advisor Aaron Eves—spent three full days at Headwaters Farm in Cobourg, Ont., as Locke rumbled around in the brush, his character spouting questionable nature know-how and some core beliefs. It all comes to a head in “Worms,” when an event sends Chris into an emotional spiral. A lot of work went into those three days, production-wise, figuring out logistics and camera angles.

“Visually you look at it and you think, ‘Oh, he’s just being a goof,’ but the technical aspect behind that is huge,” Locke reveals. “And I can’t stress this enough that Derek did it all by himself.” Filming had its challenges and wasn’t restricted to just weather, fauna and foliage. Capturing a key scene at a lake was delayed until the last possible moment thanks to a group of young guys who wandered into Locke’s vicinity.

“I was like, ‘Oh my god, are you serious?’ We had waited all day to get this shot,” he says. “They ducked behind a bunch of bushes, probably to smoke something, and as soon as they did I said, ‘Let’s go,’ stripped off all my clothes and jumped into the lake in one take.”

Learning Nature with Chris Locke is available on Funny or Die now.

Images courtesy of iThentic.

 

 

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Link: Interview: The Amazing Gayl Pile’s Morgan Waters

From Charles Trapunski of Brief Take:

Link: Interview: The Amazing Gayl Pile’s Morgan Waters
“It’s sort of like an absurdist, dark, melodrama comedy series, that goes in a million different directions. I guess they’d have to see it to get the tone, but people that I’m inspired by, like Steve Coogan who plays Alan Partridge, he would be a dream collaborator.” Continue reading. 

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