Tag Archives: Catherine Reitman

Link: Catherine Reitman reflects on creating ‘Workin’ Moms’ and reaching seventh, final season: “I’m Still in Disbelief”

From Etan Vlessing of The Hollywood Reporter:

Link: Catherine Reitman reflects on creating ‘Workin’ Moms’ and reaching seventh, final season: “I’m Still in Disbelief”
“In America, the edgiest storyline is the abortion storyline. In Canada, it’s no big deal. In Canada, it’s these women are so flawed, that they do things that are occasionally unlikable. That’s the biggest bump here.” Continue reading.

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Workin’ Moms begins production on seventh season of the hit CBC and Netflix original comedy

From a media release:

Wolf + Rabbit Entertainment announced today that principal photography has begun on the seventh season of the original hit comedy series WORKIN’ MOMS (13×30). Creator and Executive Producer Catherine Reitman(Black-ish, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia), who also stars in the lead role of Kate Foster, also announced this season will be the final season of the series. WORKIN’ MOMS offers an unflinching look at the absurd realities of life as a mom, partner, and friend. The new season, currently shooting in various locations in and around Toronto, will premiere on CBC and CBC Gem in Winter 2023 followed by a global release – everywhere outside Canada – on Netflix.

“To our incredible fans, making this show has been the ride of my life. Philip and I hit the ground, day one of season one, with a three-month old and a two-year-old, watching as we pressed forward on one mission: to tell the stories of four flawed mothers, who dared to be something beyond their nurseries. Going to work every day, whether in the room with our brilliant writers, on set with our extraordinary cast or in post with the best producing team in the business, has cemented in me the importance of telling stories that have meaning, surrounded by artisans who get it,” says Reitman. “But like any story, there must be an ending. And so, it is with love and gratitude that I’m announcing season seven as our final season. The biggest thank you to our partners, CBC and Netflix, for getting behind a show that points a flashlight into the darkest corners of motherhood. To those of you who’ve stopped me on the street, to share your love of the show – I see you. I hear you. And I thank you. Go get ’em mamas…”

Picking up where season six left off, WORKIN’ MOMS season seven will see the women confront demons from their past in order to move forward into their future. Motherhood, relationships, and career choices will all be put to the test, as they come to terms with who they once were and where they’re each headed. As we bid farewell to Kate, Anne, Sloane, Jenny, and Val, it’s up to each of them to decide the impact they’ll leave with their work, the traits they’ll pass on to their children, and ultimately, how much more sh*t they’re willing to take as workin’ moms.

Reprising their roles are Dani Kind as Anne; Jessalyn Wanlim as Jenny; Philip Sternberg as Nathan; Ryan Belleville as Lionel; Sarah McVie as Val; Sadie Munroe as Alice; Peter Keleghan as Richard; Nikki Duval as Rosie; and Enuka Okuma as Sloane Mitchell, among other fan favourites.

Catherine Reitman has been recognized by the Alliance for Women in Media with multiple Gracie Awards for WORKIN’ MOMS— in 2021 for Showrunner Fiction, Comedy and in 2020 for Best Lead Actress, Comedy and for Best Direction, Comedy. The Gracies® are named after media pioneer Gracie Allen, who embodied the character of the awards, and recognize exemplary programming created by, for and about women in radio, television, and interactive media.

WORKIN’ MOMS is executive produced by Catherine Reitman (Black-ish, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia), Philip Sternberg (Workin’ Moms, Six Little McGhees), Jonathan A. Walker (BetweenTrailer Park Boys), Tina Horwitz (Workin’ Moms) and Joe Sorge (Wild Yellowstone). This season Jessie Gabe (Mr. D, Being Erica) and Karen Kicak (Mary Kills PeopleDetention Adventure) are Showrunners and also serve as Executive Producers. Lisa Benedetto (Workin’ Moms) is Co-Executive Producer and Daniel Gold (Workin’ Moms) is supervising producer. 

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Preview: Workin’ Moms’ Kate struggles in Season 6 return

Workin’ Moms continues to work it, six seasons in. The story of female friends supporting each other through the trials and tribulations of life has been a truly enjoyable one, thanks to strong writing and performances from everyone involved.

However, I was concerned coming into Season 6. Returning Tuesday at 9 p.m. on CBC, this would be the first without Juno Rinaldi, who announced in September that she had exited Workin’ Moms. Would there be a massive hole in plotlines where Frankie used to be?

Well, no, because there were plenty of storylines to go around for everyone else. When we last left the show, the Season 5 cliffhanger suggested Nathan had a son no one knew about and Kate and Sloane’s relationship had come to a disastrous head.

In Tuesday’s return, “Kate Fosters,” Nathan and Kate are struggling with the realization Nathan may actually be Nathan’s son. How will he fit into the family dynamic? Does he fit into the family dynamic? Is Nathan really Nathan’s kid? A DNA test will confirm it, but the physical characteristics they’re showing have Kate convinced, particularly during a spaghetti dinner that is equally cringy and laugh-out-loud funny.

The office isn’t a respite for Kate either. Sloane’s mind games derail a meeting with a potential client, while Mo is raking them in.

By the episode’s end, things seem to be slowly getting back on track, but I have a feeling things won’t be any easier in the weeks to come for Kate. I look forward to finding out how things shake out for her, and the other ladies, in Season 6.

Workin’ Moms airs Tuesdays at 9 p.m. on CBC and CBC Gem.

Image courtesy of CBC.

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Juno Rinaldi exits CBC’s Workin’ Moms after five seasons

There will be no Frankie in Season 6 of Workin’ Moms. Juno Rinaldi, who has played the role of real estate agent Frankie Coyne for five seasons, made the announcement on Instagram Thursday morning.

“To my dear cast, crew, friends, families and fans of the show. I have made the hard decision not to return to Workin’ Moms this season,” she wrote.

“As an artist I felt like it was time to pursue other creative opportunities as an actor and different opportunities in other mediums within the business (specifically, writing and producing). Frankie was a role of a lifetime. Deep gratitude goes out to @reitcatou for taking a chance on a nobody like me. I had 5 glorious seasons with truly incredible people and now I am so excited to see where Workin’ Moms goes next , I know it’s going to be fantastic!

All my love. Juno.”

Rinaldi’s post was quickly answered by her Workin’ Moms co-star, show co-creator, director and executive producer Catherine Reitman, who wrote:

“Telling these stories without Frankie this season was hard. Your spirit will be missed more than you know. But I speak for many when I say, we can’t wait to see what’s on the horizon for you ❤️ Sending you all the good stuff and more #teamfrankieforlife”

Earlier this summer, CBC announced that Season 6 of Workin’ Moms would return in the winter.

Image courtesy of CBC.

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Workin’ Moms: Catherine Reitman and Dani Kind talk Season 5

But changes are afoot for the ladies when Workin’ Moms returns to CBC on Tuesday night.

Like many programs, COVID-19 impacted production on the primetime comedy both creatively and physically. Production on the show, which is usually filmed indoors, was in many instances moved outside. And, the pandemic worked its way into the Carlson’s plans: upon arriving in Cochrane, Alberta, Anne, Lionel and the girls were forced to sequester for safety. Upon things opening up intown, Anne found herself a true stranger in a strange land and unable—so far—to cope with the upheaval.

We spoke to Workin’ Moms’ co-creator, executive producer, writer, star and director Catherine Reitman and actor Dani Kind about the upcoming 10-episode season.

Catherine, did the fact you had to work around the safety issues change anything from a writing standpoint or even a filming standpoint? Were there major changes that you had to make to the fifth season because of the pandemic?
Catherine Reitman: Huge. Yeah, I mean, look, we’re a summer show that goes into tiny, little real apartments. We’ve never been a real studio show. We’ve really been a location-based show. I think why Toronto loves the show, in particular, is because we’re in real buildings in Toronto. We’re in tiny apartments. We’re like an indie movie where we’re we’ve got two camera teams going up and down narrow stairwells with stairs that are about to give way.

We’ve shot in several buildings that have been since torn down because they’re derelict. So we couldn’t really go into buildings that had elevators. We had to move a lot of our interiors to exteriors. We could only shoot 10-hour days. We had to make a lot of concessions as far as we had to shoot in the fall to winter and add exteriors to that, so that was more complicated than we were used to. And then, from a creative standpoint, we were trying to figure out how much we were actually going to deal with COVID-19. The idea of a season of characters in masks and being six feet apart didn’t really interest me. And it’s not even that didn’t interest me. I mean, it’s our life, right?

I wanted the fans of the show to be able to come back and laugh at what we used to deem real problems. And I think that’s what our goal was this season, to put it in the rear view mirror. Deal with it quickly and get out.

Dani, what were your thoughts on having the pandemic impact the Carlson’s and their move out to Cochrane?
Dani Kind: The impact was helpful as an actor because she’s going through so much with the move already, leaving her best friend and that main relationship in her life, leaving the circle of her job, leaving a house that she loves, and then going with Lionel to this new place, but also having the pandemic hit the moment they move in just squashed everything. I found it really helpful, and also I loved that we acknowledged it, that it was happening. We didn’t just gloss over it and pretend like it was fine. It was extremely helpful to play the anxiety of what she was already going through.

Catherine, friendship is a huge part of Workin’ Moms, and to see Kate and Anne distanced by so much is tough. How much of that friendship is going to be tested? Is that the main arc of the season, this fifth season?
CR: It’s certainly one of the arcs. I know what you mean. And watching it in post, it’s funny… I think it’s Quentin Tarantino who said that you write your rough draft and then post is the last draft of the script. What worked, what didn’t work. And what was really telling to me—and to all of us—was I think we were so excited about this Anne bottle, but you do miss her friends with her. You’re so hungry for them to be together again and for Anne to get that comfort and seeing them pulled away from each other was painful. And I think it’s all too real for a lot of people.

For me personally, my friendships have taken such a back seat to my job and to my family, and to my responsibilities. To see Kate and Anne separated—this love story that we’ve been rooting for—to see them pulled away is probably a little too real for a lot of people and I don’t think I even realized that until it aired. And so challenging that is, of course, one of the big obstacles of the season. And then we sort of turn it on its head mid-season in a way that I don’t think anyone’s going to see coming.

As funny as Workin’ Moms can be, it can be very, very serious. Dani, there is an incredible scene in the season premiere where Anne isn’t saying anything, she’s just overcome with emotion. How do you feel about this storyline that has been written for Anne?
DK: I think that’s one of the greatest gifts I get being on this show is that I can be and I can play her grounded and I can play the relationships more than the comedies. I don’t think that that’s mainly my strength in the show per se.

I think playing the real is and also lends itself to Anne. That’s who she is. She’s a straight shooter. But watching a straight shooter fall is where she lives. And every season that I get the scripts and I get to see those moments in all the different ways that have unraveled in the five seasons, that’s the most exciting part for me playing her.

How Anne copes with the move to Cochrane is interesting.
CR: One of our writers was from Cochrane, specifically, and there was a group of women. This writer doesn’t have children, but a lot of her sister’s friends were in what they called the Pretty Committee. We turned it into the Cutie Committee on our show. We sort of showed the Alicia version in the Toronto Mommy and Me group and going to Cochrane and seeing how that’s changed because there are different mom gangs anywhere you are, right? And in this particular mom gang, they had to adjust from the sort of big city, high-pressure career lifestyles to a much slower lifestyle. And the way they chose to deal with it is by sedating themselves.

I know a lot of women my age who are opioid addicts. They’re taking pills to sedate themselves to just let those hours go by a little more quickly. And it’s an international problem truly, but seeing a character like Anne, who is a psychiatrist and is sharp and really smart and really understands the nature of the human mind, to see her slowly accept that and fall into that slippery slope makes us as an audience terrified.

And so watching her not only say goodbye to her friendships and the world we know in Toronto, but also maybe turn off the lights a little bit. That was something that was really fun to explore.

Workin’ Moms airs Tuesdays at 9 p.m. on CBC.

Images courtesy of CBC.

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