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CBC’s new original comedy series Little Dog announces additional casting

From a media release:

CBC, Cameron Pictures and Elemental Pictures today revealed additional casting for the new original comedy series LITTLE DOG (7 x 30). Created by and starring Joel Thomas Hynes (Mary Kills People, Orphan Black, Eyewitness), cast members joining the Ross family include Ger Ryan (The Street, The Man Who Invented Christmas) as Tommy’s true nemesis and mother, Sylvia Ross; Stephen Oates (Riverhead) as his eldest brother, Loyola “Lowly” Ross Jr; Katharine Isabelle (The Arrangement, Hannibal, Being Human) as his sister Ginny Ross; newcomer Billy Cochrane as Ginny’s son Chesley; and Andy Jones (Republic of Doyle, Random Passage, Codco) as the wily, charming old patriarch of the family, Loyola “Lowly” Ross Sr. Production is currently underway in Newfoundland for a winter 2018 premiere on CBC.

Also joining the cast are Dwain Murphy (Mohawk Girls, The Strain, The Book of Negroes) as National Welterweight champion Rico “Havoc” St. George – Tommy’s opponent both in and out of the ring, Patricia Isaac (The Magicians, Daydream Nation) as Tommy’s doctor and confidant Dr. Vaani Abdeen, Julia Chan (The Great Canadian Baking Show, Saving Hope) as Rico’s wife and Tommy’s former fiancé, and Mary Walsh (This Hour Has 22 Minutes, Sensitive Skin, Hatching, Matching & Dispatching) in a recurring role.

LITTLE DOG is the story of lightweight boxer Tommy “Little Dog” Ross (Hynes), and his haphazard quest for redemption. One fateful night five years ago, Tommy betrayed the boxer’s code of conduct during a championship bout against Rico “Havoc” St. George (Murphy) – he dropped his gloves in the middle of a round and quit the fight, dumping a promising career down the drain. Tommy has had to live with the fallout of this decision ever since.

Now Tommy has the chance for a rematch and his family isn’t sure what to think. Sure, they all loved lapping up the glory of Tommy’s spotlight – but living in the shadow of his humiliating defeat was more than they could bear. If he fights again, will it bring shame or glory? Tommy’s mother Sylvia (Ryan), a failed singer, will prove yet again to be Tommy’s true nemesis in his not-quite heroic return to the ruthless world of boxing. Tommy is a broken, would-be champion, trying to survive within an outrageously dysfunctional family. If the training doesn’t break him, his scheming relatives certainly will do their damnedest to finish the job.A CBC original series,

A CBC original series, LITTLE DOG is created by and stars actor and author Joel Thomas Hynes, whose book We’ll All Be Burnt In Our Beds Some Night was recently longlisted for the 2017 Scotiabank Giller prize. Hynes is also an executive producer. Sherry White serves as showrunner, director and executive producer. The series is executive produced by Amy Cameron, Tassie Cameron, Rob Blackie, Alex Patrick, John Vatcher, and Perry Zimel. In addition to Hynes and White, the series is written by Chris Roberts, Kerri MacDonald, Cory Bowles and Lisa Rose Snow. LITTLE DOG is directed by White, Michelle Latimer, John Vatcher and Molly McGlynn. LITTLE DOG is developed and produced by Cameron Pictures and Elemental Pictures with the participation of the Canada Media Fund, the Newfoundland and Labrador Film Development Corporation, the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit, the Newfoundland Film and Video Industry Tax Credit, and the Ontario Film and Television Tax Credit.

LITTLE DOG is developed and produced by Cameron Pictures and Elemental Pictures with the participation of the Canada Media Fund, the Newfoundland and Labrador Film Development Corporation, the Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit, the Newfoundland Film and Video Industry Tax Credit, and the Ontario Film and Television Tax Credit.

 

 

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CBC’s Sally Catto: Anne’s future still up in the air

There’s a simple, yet frustrating, reason a second season of Anne wasn’t announced at CBC’s upfront presentation on Wednesday morning. Netflix has yet to weigh in on its commitment to a sophomore go-round of Anne Shirley’s adventures in Avonlea.

“[A second season announcement] is pending,” Sally Catto, general manager, programming at CBC told us. “It’s a partnership and they’ve just started broadcast it.” That may be tough to swallow for fans who were left staring in shock at their TV screens after the cliffhanger season finale went dark, but that’s the nature of the television business today. More broadcasters and countries involved in a series can mean a waiting game.

As for fans of programs Pure, The Romeo Section, Michael: Every Day, Four in the Morning, Bellevue and This Life, it was a bitter pill to swallow after it was confirmed none will return for additional seasons on the public broadcaster.

Pure was beautifully received and done,” Catto explains of the Mennonite Mafia drama created by Michael Amo and starring Ryan Robbins, A.J. Buckley and Alex Paxton-Beesley. “If you look at it, it’s a contained story and that equally weighed into the decision. It wasn’t just a numbers decision. There was a beginning, middle and very final end to Pure. Of course, any series has the potential to have another season, but for Pure, it’s up against other programs that have been percolating in development and there is limited space in the schedule. You’re making a choice, and it’s not always easy.”

Crawford debuts this winter on CBC.

When it came to choosing new programming this fall and winter, Catto was looking for series to compliment what’s resonating with audiences. Though research plays a part in the decision, they’re looking for distinct voices and unique stories. Who has a story to tell? What’s their voice? What’s their vision? To be too narrow, she believes, is to miss gems in the making.

Catto sought to expand CBC’s comedy base by adding new projects in Mike Clattenburg’s Crawford and Little Dog from Joel Thomas Hynes. As for drama, Frankie Drake Mysteries is a natural new series to present to loyal fans of Murdoch Mysteries and literary adaptations of Margaret Atwood’s Alias Grace and Lisa Moore’s Caught fit in the network’s structure.

As for The Council, we got a final word on its fate. René Balcer’s series “set against the unfolding drama of our changing planet and draws inspiration from the true-to-life fight over the vast and valuable resources of the Arctic” that was originally announced for the 2016-16 season is not moving forward.

Images courtesy of CBC.

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