TV, eh? | What's up in Canadian television
TV,eh? What's up in Canadian television

Link: ‘Letterkenny’ review: Wonderfully weird Canadian comedy comes to Hulu

From Alan Sepinwall of Rolling Stone:

Link: ‘Letterkenny’ review: Wonderfully weird Canadian comedy comes to Hulu
Long before I figured out that Wayne’s pet insult “10-ply” refers to someone who’s soft, or could follow more than a fraction of what the hockey players or the skids (breakdancing meth-heads, led by Tyler Johnston’s melodramatic Stewart) were saying, I recognized that Letterkenny spoke in the only dialect I needed to hear: funny. Continue reading.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

Links: Killjoys, Season 4

From Bridget Liszewski and Kelly Townsend of The TV Junkies:

Link: Killjoys: 13 Things We Learned on the set of Season 4
We may already be in the dog days of summer, but things are about to get hotter with a brand new season of Killjoys.

Life in the Quad has gotten pretty complicated thanks to the Hullen and the real villain behind it all, the Lady. Dutch and Aneela, both played by Ant-Man and the Wasp star Hannah John-Kamen, are inside the Green now. Meanwhile, D’avin (Luke Macfarlane), an injured Johnny (Aaron Ashmore), and a very pregnant Delle Seyah (Mayko Nguyen) have their own issues to deal with floating around endlessly in space. Continue reading.

From Charles Trapunski of Brief Take:

Link: Interview: Killjoys’ Hannah John-Kamen
“The leader of the pack of Team Awesome Force. [giggles] What’s awesome is that Dutch gets to be the leader of Team Awesome Force, but also, she has her own faults and her own past and her past is what’s made her strong. This kind of strong person and vulnerability, they kind of walk hand in hand with Dutch and with Aneela as well.” Continue reading.

From Heather M. of TV Goodness:

Link: Previewing the Killjoys Season 4 premiere with Hannah John-Kamen and Aaron Ashmore
Just two more sleeps until Season 4 of Killjoys lands on our TVs and your patience will definitely be rewarded. Promise swear. The season premiere takes a pause of sorts on last season’s finale and instead delivers a delicious Dutch and John flashback tale wrapped within the current timeline. Continue reading.

From Dale McGarrigle of TV Fanatic:

Link: Killjoys’ Aaron Ashmore Q&A
“I wouldn’t say that he’s always been that confident. I think finding his role, being the tech guy and D’avin and Dutch so reliant on him and being so respectful of what he can do; I think that’s what caused it.” Continue reading.

From Norman Wilner of Now Toronto:

Link: Two Canadian shows expand queer representation in sci-fi
When Wynonna Earp and Killjoys return for their new seasons Friday night, they’re not just bringing goofy genre television back to Space. The two shows – created by Emily Andras and Michelle Lovretta, respectively – are not-so-quietly expanding the horizons of queer representation in fantasy.

And they’re doing it without killing anybody. Continue reading.

From Kevin Phinney of Metro Source:

Link: “Killjoys” Season 4 is a thrill ride through the non-binary galaxy
From the very beginning, Killjoys creator Michelle Lovretta has remained committed to building a world populated with all genders and orientations. From non-binary bartender/warlord Pree to royal villain/anti-hero Delle Seyah Kendry and beyond, gay lives and relationships have been given the same dramatic weight, focus and humour as any other — and never merely as victims or cannon fodder for straight characters’ “emotional growth.” Continue reading. 

From Kelly Lawler of USA Today:

Link: Why you should add Syfy’s ‘Wynonna Earp’ and ‘Killjoys’ to your watch list
Both are genre stories, obviously, but each has a female lead, quirky sidekicks and a knack for mixing action, humor, pathos and romance. They’re also lighthearted and character-driven enough that if you don’t feel like wading into their mythologies, you can simply enjoy the relationships and the humor. To be honest, I’m still confused by the magic green goo that’s the most important plot point on “Killjoys,” but I love it just the same.  Continue reading.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

Links: Wynonna Earp, Season 3

From Valerie Anne of Autostraddle:

Link: Here’s everything you need to know about “Wynonna Earp” Season Three
All this to say, one of the many reasons I know Wynonna Earp is special is because despite having a longer-than-some hiatus due to it being a 12-episode season in the summer with no breaks, the show is somehow always on the tips of everyone’s tongues. Continue reading.

From Kayti Burt of Den of the Geek:

Link: Wynonna Earp Season 3: What kind of villain will Bulshar be? 
Heading into Wynonna Earp Season 3, which premieres on July 20th, there’s still so little we actually know about Bulshar Clootie, the season’s apparent Big Bad whose rising Wynonna and friends spent all of Season 2 trying to prevent. (Spoiler alert: They were unsuccessful.) Continue reading.

From Bridget Liszewski of The TV Junkies:

Link: Wynonna Earp: Emily Andras talks “Blood Red and Going Down”
“t was really important to Melanie, and the rest of us, that Wynonna come back swinging. We see she’s back in fine form, back to whiskey-soaked and reckless and back to hair porn, for me. It’s pretty fun and I don’t hate it, even though I’ve seen it 2,000 times.” Continue reading.

From Bridget Liszewski of The TV Junkies:

Wynonna Earp’s Melanie Scrofano tackles a new challenge by directing her first scene
Where does one go after sending demons back to Hell while nine months pregnant? After filming all of Season 2 of Wynonna Earp and completing production just days before she went into labour herself, some may think that Melanie Scrofano would welcome the chance to take it easy and get a bit of a breather in Season 3. Continue reading. 

From Kat Jetson of The Hollywood Reporter:

Link: Wynonna Earp showrunner: “This is the season of answers”
“Demons are constantly trying to disguise themselves as humans and blend in, and they’re insidious in that way, so I love that these vampires truly do not care. They’re going to walk around Purgatory in the summer in their Gucci high heels, sunglasses and sequins. They have no reason to hide because they can just glamour you.” Continue reading.

From Norman Wilner of Now Toronto:

Link: Two Canadian shows expand queer representation in sci-fi
When Wynonna Earp and Killjoys return for their new seasons Friday night, they’re not just bringing goofy genre television back to Space. The two shows – created by Emily Andras and Michelle Lovretta, respectively – are not-so-quietly expanding the horizons of queer representation in fantasy.

And they’re doing it without killing anybody. Continue reading.

From Nicole Drum of Comic Book:

Link: Wynonna Earp showrunner teases Christmas episode
“[This year’s Christmas episode] is definitely one of my favorite episodes we’ve ever done. Even if it’s due to air sometime in August! As expected, an Earp Christmas is anything but traditional — the only thing you can count on is heavily rummed-up eggnog, and an anything-but-festive demon. Still, what better time than the holidays to speak the truth and ask for what you really want, whether it’s a chance to play Santa or a passionate kiss under the mistletoe?” Continue reading.

From Andrew Husband of Metro:

Link: Melanie Scrofano talks Earper fandom and Wynonna Earp Season 3
“It’s about a woman facing her demons. She can either crumble, or she can wake up every day and decide to fight. And how human is that? At the base of all monster stories, there are real human people having to deal with real life issues, like finding out who they are and their place in the world.” Continue reading.

From Kaitlyn Thomas of TV Guide:

Link: Wynonna Earp: How an Unconventional Heroine made the show must-see TV
“What makes the Syfy series truly stand out in a crowded television landscape is the accessibility of the female-led show and its rather unconventional heroine.” Continue reading.

From Kelly Lawler of USA Today:

Link: Why you should add Syfy’s ‘Wynonna Earp’ and ‘Killjoys’ to your watch list
Both are genre stories, obviously, but each has a female lead, quirky sidekicks and a knack for mixing action, humor, pathos and romance. They’re also lighthearted and character-driven enough that if you don’t feel like wading into their mythologies, you can simply enjoy the relationships and the humor. To be honest, I’m still confused by the magic green goo that’s the most important plot point on “Killjoys,” but I love it just the same.  Continue reading.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

Comments and queries for the week of July 20

Are Maz and Angie playing siblings on Private Eyes? —Lynne

Hey Lynne, thanks for the great question. No, Maz (Ennis Esmer) and Angie (Cindy Sampson) aren’t siblings, but they are longtime friends. Hence the mocking tone between them.


I still think Anna and Todd might win [The Amazing Race Canada]. Martina was a hoot during the consuming of the blueberry pie. I thought eating a whole pie looked like it would be easy but after watching that, I think I’ll just stick to eating one slice at a time! —Joyce

Three Express Passes gone in one episode also happened last year, the East Coast cousins Megan and Courtney didn’t use theirs and got eliminated. Kinda lame how two of them were used on pie, it was thick but usually they are used for something harder. I understand why the rodeo girls used their EP but they didn’t really need to with the ferry delay. It kinda wrote off the first half of the episode with everyone all together, though if anyone had missed the boat it’d have written off the end of the episode. Martina continues to be funny. Joseph got really lucky on the track at 2:59 but it didn’t save them. We haven’t had a Detour set of tasks and a Road Block in the same episode. Did the budget get cut again? Double Blind U-Turn should be interesting unless everyone is too “heroic” to do it. And finally a proper episode of the Race-international. It’s a real shame they don’t do a full worldwide season like TAR is supposed to be. —DanAmazing


Absolutely loved [Just in Time for Dinner]. It brought back so many memories! I was born in 1960 and my husband born in 1950 and we have thoroughly enjoyed “going back in time.” My son, who is 31, visits on the weekend and we re-watch the shows and he loves it! —Marion

Got a question or comment about Canadian TV? Email greg.david@tv-eh.com or via Twitter @tv_eh.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail

Killjoys: Showrunner Adam Barken discusses Season 4

When we last left Team Awesome Force, things were in a bit of a disarray. Dutch and Aneela (Hannah John-Kamen) had entered the green to do battle against The Lady, leaving Johnny (Aaron Ashmore) and D’Avin (Luke McFarlane) stunned.

Killjoys roars back on Friday at 10 p.m. ET on Space with one heck of a fun ride in “The Warrior Princess Bride.” Creator Michelle Lovretta bridges the current timeline with the past, mixing the trio of Dutch, Aneela and Khlyen (Rob Stewart) with the Dutch-Johnny origin story. It has everything Killjoys fans have come to love over the last three seasons: humour, snark, action and heart.

With two final seasons of Killjoys to look forward to, we sat down with new showrunner Adam Barken—who has been a writer and producer with the series since Season 1—to get the scoop on the adventure ahead.

Congratulations on becoming showrunner for Seasons 4 and 5 of Killjoys. What does that mean for you? Is that just more meetings?
Adam Barken: It’s more of everything. When we were done with Season 3, Michelle was feeling like, ‘All right, I kind of need to take a break and step back,’ and didn’t want to leave the show completely, so when she and I talked, we discussed how we would go forward. I still loved the show and had been her No. 2 for the last two seasons and had been on since the first, so she basically said, ‘I would still like to be involved if you were running it,’ and I said, ‘I’d only run it if you were still involved,’ so that worked out. So what it basically means is I’m here every day. I am vetting all the scripts, I’m breaking all the stories. Michelle’s involved to basically watch that process, to help me kind of shepherd them.

As both of the people who have been writing the show the longest, we kind of take a pass on everybody’s scripts and then yeah, a lot of meetings. A lot of meetings, which is just how you make television.

When I spoke to her in Season 2, she was already saying, ‘I would love to do this for a certain number of seasons and then step away because I’m always about the world building.’ She really loves that part that.
AB: Loves it. She’s great at it.

What about you? Do you like the world building as well?
AB: I love the world building as well. Not that she doesn’t, but I really like making TV. I like the meetings to a certain degree. I like the production stuff, and I love being in a writing room. I’m happy to go in and out of the room more so that I can kind of keep an eye on all the different departments and keep track of everything that’s going. Thankfully we’ve got the whole writing team back from last season.

How important is it to keep that writer’s room intact? I mean, so many writer’s room people that I talk to like yourself, there tends to be a couple of new faces every year. Other people rotate out. Why is it important to have everybody, this same group?
AB: It’s great because you just have an institutional memory, right? Everybody is …

You’ve got a shorthand already.
AB: Yeah, everybody knows everyone. We’ve kind of worked out all the personality kinks. We all know each other. We all know when to leave each other alone and when to bug each other. Then it also just means that everybody … any time a new person comes in a room, it can be a great experience because they bring fresh eyes but you also spend a lot of time going, ‘Yeah, we did that story already. Yeah, we’ve already done that beat.’ In this one, with this, you’ve always got a team going, ‘Oh, we already did that. All right, let’s do something new. Let’s do something different.’

What do you look for in a writer?
AB: Personally, what I love in a writer, especially in a writing room like this is you want ideas people. The job of a showrunner is to say no and so it’s very similar to a director in that what you want are people coming to you with five options and you being able to go ‘Yes, no, no, no, no,’ and you say no more than you say yes, so you’re looking for writers who have lots of ideas, throw them out constantly and then at the same time move on when an idea has been ‘No, we’re not gonna do that,’ and not take it personally and understand this is part of the job.

As I learned when I started in a writing room and was that person is first you’re like, ‘Oh, but that was a good idea,’ but then I get to save that for my show, which is nice, and what you’re trying to do is basically you’re all pulling together but you are pulling together towards one person’s vision, or in the case of this season, I would say two people’s, because Michelle and I are both intimately connected in terms of what the vision of the season is going forward.

The press release that Space sent out when they announced that they were going be the two final seasons, I think you were quoted, certainly, Michelle was, about the importance of being able to tell the story and having two seasons that do that. Why is it important? I mean, I think I know the answer, but why is it important to know that you’ve got two 10 episode seasons to finish with?
AB: Well, I mean, look. If we had known that we were only getting one season, we would have made that work as well. The idea that it was important was just knowing we had an endpoint, because when you know you have an endpoint, then you can build your stories to go towards it. With two seasons, it was great because even before we had gotten the order, Michelle and I had been talking, and we said, ‘You know, there’s a way to do what we were talking about,’ because we had some general ideas and tent poles, as if we had two seasons, we kind of know exactly how this would break out, so when they ended up saying, ‘How about two?’ We were like, ‘Great, we’ve already kind of thought that would be the way to do it.’

I think five is a good and a round number for television regardless of how many episodes. It’s five seasons, so with four we can kind of do some interesting stuff. We can mess around with our convention, but end on a cliffhanger that points to specific things. You know, Season 3 obviously ended on some pretty big cliffhangers, but they were pretty open-ended because we didn’t know if we were coming back, so our feeling was, ‘OK, if we don’t come back, then basically we’ve given the audience a sense of, like, the adventure continues.’ With this, we’re able to end it in a way that feels like … put a bit more of a bow on it.

Do you already know what the end scenes are? The final lines are at the end?
AB: We’ve definitely got some strong ideas about what those moments are and what the feeling is that we want people to come away from, and we’re just kind of still … as we’re figuring out season five, we’re … you know, making TV is definitely building a bridge from both sides and hoping they meet in the middle.

How often do things change, where you think, ‘Well, this will be what the end is,’ and then you’re getting there. You’re like, ‘Well, no, that isn’t going be the end, because things have changed.’
AB: Constantly.

Tony Nappo is playing Big Joe, what can you say about Big Joe?
AB: Joe was a character we introduced back in Season 1 and so he was Dutch’s mentor who, by then, had gone to seed and obviously we killed them, so how are we having them back? So what we’re doing is we got to do something really fun at the beginning of this season because we wanted to shake things up a bit and actually tell basically an origin story and we wanted to do a story of what happens when Dutch and Johnny first came to the quad.

Because we loved Tony and I remember doing the read through of 106 and I remember him reading it and getting really good and then he gets to the end and goes, ‘Ah, fuck, I’m dead?’ I was like, ‘That’s why you should always read the script before you do the read through, Tony.’ But it also … we felt the same way. We were like, ‘Goddammit, we got this great actor, this great character,’ so we get a chance to see him in action and see what he was like as a Killjoy, which was a lot of fun, so yeah, I’m very excited about that one.

Killjoys is one of those shows where no line is ever a throwaway line, no scene can just be like, ‘Oh, I can just rest because this won’t matter.’ Everything matters on this show.
AB: We want you guys to watch it many times. We hope that, yeah, the stuff that we work on … because that’s, you know, from our perspective, if we’re gonna get people’s eyeballs for 44 minutes, we want to be able to give them not only something that is a fun, hopefully fun diversion, that if they feel by the end, ‘OK, I got what I wanted,’ but if they’re gonna go back, hopefully, they’ll see that, you know, we’re trying to make sure everything feels like it matters.

Stephanie Morgenstern will direct this season. How did that come about?
AB: Because as we were looking for directors, we knew that Stephanie had stepped up and been directing in X Company. I’d been working with Stephanie since she and Mark [Ellis] created Flashpoint, so it just seemed like a no-brainer. We knew we wanted to have somebody in that was good, smart, and Stephanie just fit the bill. And Temple Street had worked with her on X Company, of course, so it just seemed like a no-brainer.

Killjoys airs Fridays at 10 p.m. ET on Space.

Images courtesy of Bell Media.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditlinkedinmail