TV, eh? | What's up in Canadian television
TV,eh? What's up in Canadian television
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Tonight: Marketplace, The Fifth Estate

Marketplace, CBC – “Truth Behind the Trend”
The real story behind the gluten-free craze. And the results of a nation-wide vote for Canada’s Dumbest Charge.

The Fifth Estate, CBC – “GM Recall: The Switch From Hell”
It was a deadly defect in an ignition switch that led to the recall of millions of cars and many deaths. In the premiere episode of the fifth estate’s 40th season, Bob McKeowen investigates what and when did GM and Transport Canada knew about the problem — and reveals startlingly new information about fatal crashes in Canada.

Link: Edge and Christian reunite on Haven

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From a media release:

Jay Reso, also known as WWE Superstar Christian, will reunite with his lifelong friend and former tag team partner Adam Copeland, aka WWE Hall of Famer Edge, for a recurring guest arc on Showcase’s fan-favourite series, Haven, which airs Thursdays at 10pm ET/PT. Reso will appear in an all-new episode airing December 4, and will reprise the role for two additional episodes airing later in 2015.

Life imitates art with Reso portraying McHugh, one of Dwight’s (Copeland) oldest and closest friends. McHugh is smart, with ice water for blood, hammers for fists and a dogged sense of loyalty. McHugh and Dwight served as Army Rangers together, as well as members of The Guard. But McHugh left this life for a simpler one, determined to remain out of the line of fire. Dwight knows he could use the help of his fierce friend, but respects McHugh’s desire to live under the radar.

When Dwight finds himself in a romantic conundrum in the episode “Chemistry,” McHugh is the first one Dwight turns to. McHugh counsels Dwight through the challenge, while also considering joining forces with his old friend to once again defend the town of Haven, Maine.

Haven, based on the novella The Colorado Kid from renowned author Stephen King, follows former FBI agent Audrey Parker, who becomes a cop in the small town of Haven, Maine, and soon discovers the town’s many secrets, which also hold the key to unlocking the mysteries of her lost past.

From leading independent studio Entertainment One (eOne), Haven is co-commissioned by Shaw Media in Canada and globally via Universal Networks International (UNI).

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Comments and queries for the week of Oct. 24

Who is the actress playing Morgan Finn, a.k.a. the guy Rebecca was flirting with on Strange Empire? I’m 99 per cent sure she is an actress, but it’s driving me crazy because I can’t place her or confirm it. The worst part is the character is currently not showing up on the the show’s IMDb cast list. If you who who she is, which show she’s from (I feel she’s from a CTV or Global series), please share.–Sarah

Good eye Sarah. That’s Joanne Boland playing Morgan Finn on Strange Empire. According to her IMDB page, Boland’s resumé includes roles on Copper, Lost Girl, Flashpoint, Haven and Being Erica.

If they divide Ty and Amy again and not have them marry, our household will not support Heartland.–Valerie

savinghope

Review: Saving Hope kisses today goodbye

Although it’s easy to bring religion into a hospital show, given the constant talk of life and death, not many series are able to handle the topic we’re supposedly not supposed to talk about with respect and grace for all parties (that’s religious AND agnostic). Perhaps it’s because such bigger picture discussions are embedded in the moral fabric of Saving Hope, but this show seems to handle the issue in a way that’s more creative than cloying.

Such was certainly the case with “Joel 2:31,” the fall finale (or at least last episode for quite some time) of Saving Hope’s third season. Although religion was touched upon via the title, as well as two major characters, directly, it wasn’t made to be the ultimate issue of the episode, but more a gateway to discussions and revelations of sorts.

First and foremost, we saw Elisa, a young woman hoping to be a minister, go through the motions of trying to reconcile her beliefs about life and her, well, beliefs, alongside the current reality. While she felt she shouldn’t be pregnant–morally and physically–considering that she was still a virgin despite being a newlywed, she had doctors telling her she most definitely was. Then, she had to deal with believing that what was inside her wasn’t actually a baby, but a “monster” of some sort (nice twist that the religious “good girl” wasn’t lying about her sexuality, right?).

Elisa (a very engaged Kendra Leigh Timmons of Wingin’ It fame) was not actually pregnant, but in fact, had bizarre tumour called a teratoma (don’t look it up, man), which made her act irrationally. Thus, the belief there was a monstrosity of sorts inside of her (how Rosemary’s Baby of her) and later, the lack of remembering she just got married. The most horrifying moment, though, was when Alex, Joel and Co. cracked open her insides and found this entity, which looked like the strangely organized remains of a overly-grown fetus. A part of me thought about Andrea Martin in My Big Fat Greek Wedding talking about the twin that lived in her neck lump during that scene and wanted to laugh. But most of me was just totally grossed out and worried that the food baby I amassed earlier had nothing to do with all the fajitas I had.

But I digress! Saving Hope is really starting to get the Strange Case of the Week formula down pat, finding interesting ways to wrap intriguing disorders or diseases around bigger issues like, as mentioned before, religion. This tumour living in this girl, for example, served as a perfect statement on the fears we carry around with us–about ourselves, about others, about our beliefs, about others’ beliefs in us–until they eat away at our insides. In a way, Alex is suffering a similar fate to Elisa, holding her insecurities about her feelings for Joel in her belly even as there are signs–literal signs saying “Joel 2:31″!–telling her to act on them. And that other patient featured this week, the girl with the “internal decapitation” (that’s a thing and it’s terrifying), was carrying around her grief and guilt left over from the death of her twin, and as a result, nearly forcing herself to cross over to the so-called other side prematurely.

The good news is, all of our ladies made the moves they needed to make to keep, well, moving.  Say what you want to say about Joel and Alex as endgame, but man, that final moment, with them clearly wrapped up in the heat of pre-passion smoochies, was super hot thanks to Durance and Gilles’ game faces and exactly what–I can’t believe I’m saying this, but it’s true–the doctor ordered. After one too many fake-outs, it’s time for some make-outs, even if they aren’t between the two on your chosen “team” (sorry, Charlie and Alex fans!) Everyone deserves a little somethin’ somethin’ at the end of a heavy day–hey, there was talk of the apocalypse!–like this one. But this group is especially deserving, since it looks like everyone’s future is looking grim come the second half of the season.

Judging by the preview shown at the end of the episode, we’re going to see more trouble ahead for Alex and her hand, but also we’re going to see poor Shahir suffer a possible heart attack during surgery. Say what?

Just when we were starting to regain our hope for Hope after Gavin’s departure, another key part of Hope Zion’s mass of excellent side characters is at risk of being forcibly removed. Here’s hoping that guy that looked like Jesus is working some magic right now, even if it just means maintaining his beard so he can bring us some needed comic relief in the near future.

More Hope-ful thoughts:

  • “Eat cheese and rob a bank” are your two Last Days activities, Alex? Atta girl.
  • Where does one get that sexy top–bra? tank?–that Erica Durance was wearing in that last scene? Asking for a friend…
  • Zach too was carrying around some baggage, but not about his love life or religion, but his connection with his son. Kudos to Benjamin Ayres for pulling off both cynical (with aforementioned Jesus man) and sentimental (with Zach’s son) in such a short period of time.
  • More Maggie and Joel comedic interaction, please!

 

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Review: Audrey returns to Haven

When we last left the fine folks of Haven–in last week’s “The Old Switcheroo”–Gloria and Dwight had switched bodies, as had Nathan and Duke and Dave and Vince; a situation that had everyone reeling. Nathan had just found out about Duke and Audrey smooching in Colorado, and was rightly POed. Problem was, the man responsible for the Trouble was on the run.

“The Old Switcheroo Too” picked up with Duke and Nathan (still “all Freaky Friday” as Duke/Nathan said) realizing that Mara had been playing the two by acting like Audrey had fought her way to the surface. That cagey chick. Again, I’m thrilled that the producers decided to lighten things up with this Trouble. It’s allowed all of the cast involved in the story to flex some comedic muscles. And while the Dwight/Gloria switch is the best ever, Nathan and Duke have been pretty fun too.

“Your whole body is numb!” Duke marvelled, slapping Nathan’s face repeatedly. “Yeah? I didn’t realize you went … commando,” Nathan grimly observed. (I’d love to know how many takes that scene took to film.) More seriously, though, Duke was getting ready to explode and needed to expel an old Trouble. The two came up with a novel idea: release a reincarnation Trouble that would bring Audrey out of Mara. It was at this point I got a little confused. Not with the idea, but the fact that I sometimes lose track of who’s really speaking. Regardless, the plan sounded good to me.

And the boys were right: Mara had been acting like Audrey as a ploy to escape. Problem was, Nathan was too weak to unleash the Trouble and things looked like they were headed back to same-old, same-old. When Duke said, “I’m sorry that we can’t all find TRUE LOVE like you, Nathan,” I almost slapped my forehead. If Nathan has to jump through this many hoops for true love, maybe he should give it up.

Vince and Dave attempted to right everything down in North Carolina, but the thinny was making it hard for them to reunite the Doohan brothers and reverse the Trouble. After a few tense seconds they managed to save each other from entering the portal and resolved never to go near it again. I have to assume that at some point a thinny will end up sucking in Dave. His “other side” and adoption background is revving up to be one heck of an intriguing story and I’m glad Haven‘s creative team have decided to give the Teagues’ some quality airtime. I was particularly excited about Dave/Vince’s vision of a man running through the forest and carving “Croatoan” into a tree before being touched by an unidentified hand that released black smoke from his eyes.

The Doohan brothers’ reunion reversed the body swap Trouble, opening the door for Duke to release a reincarnation Trouble to rid Audrey of Mara for the last time. Did it work? After a massive flash and sound blast, the answer came in the form of a nekkid Audrey arriving at The Gull. (As if Emily Rose didn’t have enough on her plate, twisting her face and adjusting her voice to play Mara, now it looks like she’ll be going full-Orphan Black by physically playing the two women.)

Meanwhile, the revelation that Dwight’s sister was killed when her Trouble activated in Cincinnati opens the door for his storyline to expand. That’s good news. Like Vince, Dave and Gloria, learning more about Dwight and the supporting citizens of Haven just adds to the show’s appeal.

Haven airs Thursdays at 10 p.m. ET/PT on Showcase.