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TV,eh? What's up in Canadian television

Link: Lost Girl writers team up for Killjoys

From Den of Geek:

New Details on Syfy’s Killjoys
Fans of Lost Girl and Orphan Black, delight! Fans of women who kick butt onscreen and off, you are allowed to delight even more. Whyfore you ask? Because Michelle Lovretta, Lost Girl writing veteran and the show’s producer Emily Andras have joined super-sexy forces to create a female helmed space-action romp like no other. Their show, Killjoys, is about a group of bounty hunters — in space! Continue reading.

Link: Schitt’s Creek gets US broadcaster

From Deadline:

Pop Picks Up Eugene Levy Comedy ‘Schitt’s Creek’ As First Original Scripted Series
Pop, the soon-to-be-rebranded TVGN, has picked up Schitt’s Creek, the 13-episode Canadian comedy series created by and starring Eugene Levy and his son Daniel Levy. Schitt’s Creek, which marks the first original scripted series in the history of TVGN, will be part of Pop’s launch slate, joining a half dozen unscripted and docu-series announced earlier this month. Continue reading.

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Tonight: Rick Mercer Report, 22 Minutes, Bachelor Canada

Rick Mercer Report, CBC
Rick joins a Dalhousie University project tagging sharks in the ocean off Halifax and then he goes flour bombing with the Kingston Flying Club in Kingston, ON.

22 Minutes, CBC
NDP Leader, Thomas Mulcair and Calgary’s Mayor, Naheed Nenshi make special guest appearances.

Bachelor Canada, City
Bachelor Tim and the ladies visit Tuscany to experience the ultimate in romance…but when Bachelorette’s shocking indiscretion steals centre stage, Tim is left wondering who is here for the wrong reasons.

tvehpodcast

TV, eh? podcast episode 168 – Whisper to a Stream

Anthony, Greg and Diane mull over the news that Rogers and Netflix make strange bedfellows with a new series called Between, why the CRTC doesn’t regulate movie theatres, HBO’s internet streaming plans, the Conservative Broadcasting Corporation, how the CBC lost everything — like, everything — with the new hockey deal, and Greg’s Ice Pilots NWT online chat.

Listen or download below, or subscribe via iTunes or any other podcast catcher with the TV, eh? podcast feed.

Want to become a Patron of the Podcast? We’ve got a Patreon page where you can donate a small amount per podcast and get a sneak peek of each release.

murd

Review: Murdoch Mysteries gets wild in Western themed tale

After having the first two episodes of Murdoch Mysteries deal with some pretty dark subject matter–human trafficking and the after effects of Brackenreid’s awful beating–I was glad for a rollicking good ride thanks to a couple of miscreants from the annals of history.

“Glory Days,” written by Peter Mitchell and Jordan Christianson and directed by star Yannick Bisson, welcomed Robert Leroy Parker and Harry Alonzo Longabaugh–also known as Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid–to Toronto where they became embroiled in a storyline focusing on William Barclay “Bat” Masterson (Steven Ogg), the frontier lawman, gambler and sports writer who pulled a gun on the notorious duo moments before a prize fight featuring Canadian boxer George “Little Chocolate” Dixon. Higgins and Jackson were in the audience and tackled Bat before he squeezed off a shot in the packed room.

Bloody hell indeed.

With Bisson directing, the somewhat light-hearted episode turned its focus to not only whether the dastardly duo was in Toronto but to Murdoch and Julia’s upcoming nuptials. Turns out Margaret Brackenreid wanted to take over the planning of their happy day. Or something as small as taking care of the flowers. Anything, Brackenreid confessed, to get Margaret to stop talking about it during dinner. Speaking of the wedding, Julia wasn’t so sure she wanted to have the ceremony in Murdoch’s Catholic church, so she went to speak to Father Clements (Anthony Lemke) about it and was challenged to consider her own faith in the church.

As it turned out, the men Bat saw at the fight weren’t Butch and Sundance but the lawman (who took great pleasure in showing Julia his, um, six-shooter) wasn’t about to give up on the hunt. He grew only more bold when two men robbed the Bank of Toronto at gunpoint and were identified by the stuttering manager that Butch and Sundance were on the loose. Things got serious when a train headed to Simcoe, Ont., was robbed of its Grand Trunk Railroad payroll by the criminals and a man was killed in the process. It was then the truth came out: Butch and Sundance weren’t really in the city but Bat lied they were because he missed his “glory days.”

There were several funny moments during the chase, most notably Brackenreid, Crabtree and Murdoch standing outside a house of ill repute while Bat “questioned” a young woman who claimed to have seen the two. Murdoch Mysteries can be serious to be sure, but it can be very, very funny too. Who else howled when Murdoch stumbled into the table after he was proffered by the prostitute or snickered in anticipation of Crabtree’s bachelor party for the detective?

And a special thank you to Mitchell and Christianson for including “horseback ride” in Monday’s script; having the Toronto coppers play cowboy–complete with an expansive accompanying soundtrack–was a great nod to the wild West. And Murdoch’s football tackle of a baddie through the wall of a hay loft? Just awesome.

Murdoch Mysteries airs Mondays at 8 p.m. on CBC.