TV, eh? | What's up in Canadian television
TV,eh? What's up in Canadian television

Links: Workin’ Moms, Season 4

From Melissa Hank of Postmedia:

Link: Catherine Reitman serves up the naked truth on Workin’ Moms
“Just because they’re moms doesn’t mean they can’t take the ride of what it is to make the ‘good’ or ‘bad’ choice.” Continue reading.

From Bridget Liszewski of The TV Junkies:

Link: Workin’ Moms stars preview what’s to come in Season 4
“I know there’s a lot of Team Nathans, and an equal amount Team Mikes, so it was a difficult question to answer, but we did it before the show aired so lucky for us, we had already committed to a path.” Continue reading.

From Victoria Ahearn of the Canadian Press:

Link: Catherine Reitman says there’s a ‘real hunger’ for shows like ‘Workin’ Moms’
“It blows my mind that a woman in another country who is raising her baby under totally different circumstances than I am is having the exact same human experience that I am, and can find that through the show.” Continue reading.

 

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Ron E. Scott returns to APTN with procedural drama Tribal

It’s no secret that I loved Blackstone. Created by Ron E. Scott (above right), the APTN drama series was an unflinching look at life—and death—on a Canadian First Nations reservation. Violent, dramatic and unflinching, it was very much like The Sopranos in tone while its stories were about what life is really like on reservations.

Now Scott is back with a new series. Debuting Thursday at 9 p.m. ET on APTN, Tribal is more procedural but no less dramatic. Jessica Matten (above left)—last seen on Frontier—plays Samantha Woodburn, a First Nations woman who is teamed with big-city cop Chuck “Buke” Bukansky, played by Brian Markinson (Unspeakable, Continuum), to solve crimes on and off the reservation.

We spoke to writer, creator, director and executive producer Ron E. Scott about Tribal‘s beginning and where it goes in Season 1. At press time, APTN had announced a second season of Tribal had been ordered.

How did Tribal come about? Was this something you were developing while Blackstone was going on, or did you take some time off from Blackstone and then start working on this?
Ron E. Scott: As a content creator, I’m always developing projects. I had three or four projects that I was working on, and Tribal was one of them. You just don’t know what’s going to go. We’re just so thankful that APTN saw a lot of value in the project and saw that it was going to be great for their audience, so they went ahead and greenlit the show.

Did anything change in the time between pitching APTN and them green-lighting it and then you heading into production? 
RS: They definitely had some ideas of what they wanted to deliver to their audience. And so there were discussions and there was some back and forth. We shaped it for a certain demographic, a certain time zone, time period, which is always something that of a content creator goes into, your conception of what you’re delivering to your audience.

What is the tone like? 
RS: Blackstone has its aggressive, confrontational, very kind of in your face. I think this is kind of a progression of North American native storytelling. This character has a lot of dimensions and it’s something that I don’t think we’ve seen before. In that way, I think it’s a progression. It’s not Blackstone and it’s not anything that’s really been out there. At the same time, it’s told with a Native American voice. Our lead is a Native American woman. I think the tricky part is we don’t know what to call Native People in America or Canada anymore. It’s Indigenous one week and it’s Aboriginal, First Nation.

So we’re running around, trying to figure this out, and I think that we deal with that a little bit in the show. It is a crime drama, so there’s a crime of the week, but it’s a character-driven crime drama. We’re driving characters forward and story and then we get into this really beautiful kind of arc and later in the season, where we’re starting to see a real crescendo of commentary from like I said, a Native American viewpoint.

Jessica Matten is your female lead. 
RS: Whenever we create a story world where there’s a mashup between Tribal Police and the city police, a lot of people don’t understand that the jurisdictions of any Canadian reserve is held with the Canadian government. Technically, in the traditional days, the RCMP, which is the federal government, would have control over the reserves.

And so what happened is there have been hints of corruption. It hasn’t been sustained. It’s just allegations. And so the federal government comes and goes. In this day and age, this is not looking good for us, so we’re going to take over the Tribal police, but we’re going to remove the chief who is corrupt. Let’s say he is an old boys’ club kind of thing. It’s a very interesting kind of dynamic that unfolds. It’s a story world that I don’t know how far away it would be from reality because, in this day and age, there’s still some reserves that are being third-partied by the federal government. A lot of people don’t know this, but it’s a very interesting dynamic that unfolds. Let’s put forward the most politically correct candidates and let’s go from there, but we’re still in control, which is a big part of what the government does everywhere.

Talk about working with Brian Markinson.
RS: He’s just so talented and he was very impressed with the role. He loves the writing and so he was all over it. And I can’t say enough about him and Jessica. They create this collision on screen, but there’s a chemistry that is really interesting. I’m looking forward to hearing what people think about their chemistry, too, how it develops throughout the first season.

Has it been a bit of a learning curve for you then when you’re talking about filming a more procedural show?
RS: I definitely learned a lot on Season 1, and it’s just like when you’re flexing different muscles. It’s not like you’re learning a new sport. It’s just finding opportunities to kind of get in there and have a voice.

At the same time, we’re still trying to be aware that we’re creating a dynamic of characters. And so that’s not lost whatsoever. So I’m very proud of how these two characters navigate the season and they don’t always see eye to eye. We get a perspective from the Native and a non-Native perspective on both sides. There are always two sides presented.

That kind of collision, I think, is intelligent television. And I think that’s what I always strive for.

Tribal airs Thursdays at 9 p.m. ET on APTN.

Images courtesy of Prairie Dog Film + Television.

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Nominations announced for the 2020 Canadian Screen Awards

From a media release:

The nominees for the 2020 Canadian Screen Awards were announced today in 141 film, television, and digital media categories by the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television (the Canadian Academy). The Awards will be presented in Toronto over five days during Canadian Screen Week, including the Canadian Screen Awards Broadcast Gala, which airs live on CBC and the CBC Gem streaming service on Sunday, March 29 at 8:00 PM (9:00 PM AT/9:30 PM NT).

The CBC hit series Schitt’s Creek leads both television and overall Canadian Screen Award nominations with 26 in total. These include: Best Comedy Series; Best Writing, Comedy; and Best Direction, Comedy, as well as multiple acting nominations in Best Lead Actor, Comedy; Best Lead Actress, Comedy; Best Supporting Actress, Comedy; and Best Supporting Actor, Comedy. Leading the film categories, François Girard’s The Song of Names received nine nominations in total, including Achievement in Art Direction / Production Design, Achievement in Costume Design, and Achievement in Visual Effects.

For the list of 2020 Canadian Screen Awards nominees, please visit academy.ca/nominees.

“Whether our nominees are household names or not as well known, we are privileged to celebrate their achievements at the Canadian Screen Awards,” said Beth Janson, CEO, Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television. “Supporting these voices has never been more important, and we are proud to be at the heart of those efforts.”

“What was a moment is now a full-on movement, with Canadians and the content they create finally giving a voice to the vibrant communities they represent,” said John Young, Chair, Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television. “We are honoured to bring well-deserved attention to these incredible creative works.”

The Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television proudly acknowledges the support of its Leading Media Partner, CBC; its Premier Partner, Telefilm Canada; Platinum Partner, CTV; Principal Partner, Netflix; and its Lead Partners, the Canada Media Fund, Cineplex, and the Cogeco Fund.

Canadian Screen Week – March 23 – 29, 2020
Canadian Screen Week brings together the screen-based industry to celebrate the country’s top talent in the film, television, and digital sectors with a multitude of events that culminate in the live broadcast of the Canadian Screen Awards on CBC and the CBC Gem streaming service on March 29, 2020 at 8:00 PM (9:00 PM AT / 9:30 PM NT). The week as a whole engages, inspires, and educates Canadians in the media industry and beyond. In addition to five award galas, the fan-favourite Family Fan Day meet and greet event (presented by Shaw Rocket Fund, March 28, 2020) and the Members Lounge professional development conference and coworking hub (March 23 – March 27, 2020) offer both members and the general public the chance to enjoy Canadian Screen Week.

Canadian Screen Award winners and Special Award recipients will be honoured at one of the five gala events: The CTV Gala Honouring Non-Fiction Programming (March 23, 2020); The CTV Gala Honouring Creative Fiction Storytelling (March 24, 2020); The Gala Honouring Digital Storytelling (presented with the participation of the Independent Production Fund, March 28, 2020); The Cinematic Arts Gala (presented by CBC Films, March 29, 2020); and the Canadian Screen Awards Broadcast Gala (March 29, 2020).

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Workin’ Moms’ Dani Kind previews Anne’s Season 4 journey

When we last left Workin’ Moms, Kate (Catherine Reitman) was on the cusp of making a major decision. Would she choose to forgive Nathan (Philip Sternberg) for his extra-marital transgressions in favour of keeping her family together, or would she choose a relationship with Mike (Victor Webster)?

We find out what Kate’s decision is within moments of Season 4’s return on Tuesday at 9:30 p.m. on CBC. And, suffice it to say, her pick makes waves. But Kate isn’t the only one who has made dramatic choices. In Tuesday’s return, “Charade,” we catch up with Anne (Dani Kind), who is doubling down on her parenting skills from Season 3, which saw her being overprotective of her daughter, Alice (Sadie Munroe), much to the chagrin of Anne’s husband, Lionel (Ryan Belleville).

We caught up with Dani Kind ahead of Workin’ Moms’ return to get her take on Season 4 and Anne’s parenting skills.

Congratulations on Season 4. When you signed on for the first season, did you ever think that there’d be a fourth?
Dani Kind: No. Just looking at old pictures of how young my kids were when the show started, and I was like, ‘Where the hell did the last few years go?’ It’s so insane. It’s amazing that anything in this industry ever gets made because it’s all so hard to make anything. But on top of it, I was thinking about us all being moms of way younger kids and I was just like, ‘How the fuck did we even show up in the morning?’

Last season Anne was very protective of Alice, jumping out of the bushes, taking her phone, etc. What was it like playing that character in the last season? Anne has evolved and we’re seeing a side of her that maybe makes some people feel a little bit uncomfortable.
DK: Totally, totally. And I don’t think she would generally be an over-protective helicopter parent, but I think because of what she was dealing with, post going through that situation with Brad, and I think that she went a little manic. The pendulum swung the other way to fiercely, fiercely protect her daughter because she was processing all of those feelings. So psychologically I was like, ‘Yes, absolutely.’ But then playing it was just the greatest thing in the world and Sadie Munroe, who plays Alice is, her and Ryan are … I couldn’t have ever asked for a better TV family then than those two. And they’re the easiest people on the planet to act with. And so when Catherine was like, ‘OK, and so now you’re going to do this fighting scene and teach her how to punch people on the dick.’ Sadie and I were both … I say it all the time, but it is like summer camp. Every time we get to do stuff like that and Ryan and Sadie are the greatest people to act with.

In Tuesday’s return, Anne is attempting to shop a book around about parenting. She still has this very strict regimen with Alice. As a parent, how do you feel about the way that Anne is parenting? Can you relate to any of this?
DK: No, I mean I don’t parent that way. I can definitely sympathize with what she’s going through because my kids aren’t teenagers yet. I’ve seen my sister go through it and I know what kind of teenager I was. And as a parent, I can sympathize with any parents just being like, ‘I don’t know what I’m doing. I’m trying my best.’ And I think that’s all Anne’s doing. She’s not maybe doing the best thing, but she’s trying her absolute best and she’s Anne so she goes 110 per cent at everything.

You already mentioned Sadie. What’s it been like working with her over the years? I mean you literally have been watching her grow up in front of your eyes over these past four seasons.
DK: I feel really lucky to work with her because of the actress she is. But also their real-life family, her parents are so incredible and she has two brothers and one of her brothers is also an actor and the way her family operates and the way that they’ve embraced me in their life and they let me spend time with her outside of set before we choose, we have lunch and stuff and they’ve just been really open arms about the whole experience.

I’m just in awe of her parents coming to set every day and the way that they treat her and it really reflects for what kind of actress she’s becoming. Watching her grow up on set has been a real honour to watch and I’m trying to watch carefully so that I can steal things to parent my boys. And that face she has is so innocent. Wait until you see her this season. She needs her own show. I’ve said it a hundred times, but she should just have her own show.

What’s going on with Anne’s journey this season? What can you say?
DK: What can I say? I mean, she has a new look this season. I wish I could talk more about where the look comes from or why she’s doing it, but she’s on her own journey with this book and she’s trying to develop this book and she has this great storyline. But then I think the storyline of her and Kate always trumps all of it. So I don’t know how much more I can say about that, but there are some struggles again this season that they have to work through together. Her and Kate.

Workin’ Moms airs Tuesdays at 9:30 p.m. on CBC.

Images courtesy of CBC.

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HGTV Canada pays it forward with all-star cast in new Canadian original series Family Home Overhaul

From a media release:

HGTV Canada pays it forward with an all-star cast in the powerful, heartwarming new Corus Studios original series, Family Home Overhaul (8×60), premiering Sunday, April 26 at 10 p.m. ET/PT. Viewers will get a first look at the series with a special sneak peek on April 19 during the season finale of Extreme Makeover: Home Edition. Hosted by ET Canada‘s Cheryl Hickey, the debut season will see 14 of the network’s top contractors and designers pair up in each episode to transform the homes of eight inspirational families nominated by their communities.

Whether it’s providing shelter to those in need, overcoming life-altering health issues, or donating all of their time and resources to support a cause close to their heart – these eight homeowners are always the first to give back to their communities, despite the personal hardships they encounter. With little time for the four walls around them, these families could use a major home renovation.

Together with Cheryl Hickey, HGTV Canada contractors and designers Kate Campbell, Sebastian Clovis, Dave Coleman, Joey Fletcher, Sarah Keenleyside, Dave Kenney, Brian McCourt, Scott McGillivray, Mia Parres, Tiffany Pratt, Samantha PynnTommy Smythe, Kortney Wilson and Dave Wilson, work together to provide these selfless families with life-changing renovations.

Enlisting the help of friends and neighbours, each project is customized to perfectly reflect the unique needs of each family. While the renovation is underway, the family gets whisked away on a well-deserved one week vacation. Upon their return, the remarkable reveal of their newly renovated home is celebrated by the community and team that made it all happen.

Family Home Overhaul is produced by Proper Television in association with Corus Entertainment’s HGTV Canada.

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