TV, eh? | What's up in Canadian television
TV,eh? What's up in Canadian television

Season three of Eyes for the Job premieres September 10 on AMI-tv

From a media release:

Chris and Alex are tackling their biggest projects yet! Accessible Media Inc. (AMI) announced that Season three of Eyes for the Job, the 13-part television series starring Chris Judge and Alex Haider, premieres Tuesday, September 10, at 8 p.m. Eastern on AMI-tv.

Produced by Clerisy Entertainment, Eyes for the Job is set in Halifax and features Nova Scotian co-hosts Chris Judge and Alex Haider. Chris, who is blind, is a lifelong handyman and do-it-yourself enthusiast. Joining him once again is Alex, who couples her creativity and enthusiasm with social media and outreach know-how.

Season three marks changes at the community workshop. Alex takes control of many projects, giving Chris even more time to tell jokes, practice his singing and even take a selfie or two. They also challenge themselves—and each other—with bigger projects, inviting friends and contributors to help them convert an old dresser into a change table, construct an apple press, and put their personal touches on a pair of custom baseball bats. Eyes for the Job becomes a family affair as Chris’ brother, Darren, stops by to help his sibling build a doghouse.

In keeping with AMI’s mandate of making accessible media for all Canadians, Season three of Eyes for the Job features Integrated Described Video (IDV): Chris and Alex describe their actions and surroundings during filming to make the program accessible to individuals who are blind or partially sighted.

Beginning on September 10, Eyes for the Job airs Tuesdays at 8 p.m. Eastern on AMI-tv. Check your local listings for the AMI-tv channel in your area or use AMI’s online channel guide. Episodes will be available online after the initial broadcast at AMI.ca or on the AMI-tv App.

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Filming in Winnipeg has begun on Entertainment One’s Burden of Truth Season 3 for CBC

From a media release:

Entertainment One (eOne), ICF Films and Eagle Vision today announced that cameras are rolling on Season 3 of CBC original drama series Burden of Truth (8×60). Following attorney Joanna Chang (Kristin Kreuk; Smallville, Beauty and the Beast), Burden of Truth continues production in Winnipeg until late October. Burden of Truth airs on CBC in Canada and the CW in the US.

In Season 2, corporate attorney Joanna Chang was dragged into the shadowy world of hackers and activists in a case that threatened her life. In the new season Joanna and Billy Crawford are working together in their new boutique law firm, Crawford Chang, when an old friend abruptly re-enters Joanna’s life in desperate need of help. To save her friend, Joanna must take on an impossible-to-win case and confront a long-buried secret from her childhood that may threaten her relationship and partnership with Billy. After this case, nothing will be the same again.

Reprising their roles for Season 3 are Peter Mooney (Rookie Blue, Saving Hope) as Billy Crawford, Millwood’s local attorney; Star Slade (Emerald Code) as Luna Spence; Meegwun Fairbrother (Mohawk Girls, Hemlock Grove) as Officer Owen Beckbie; and Anwen O’Driscoll (Emerald Code, Flint) as Taylor Matheson.

A CBC original series, Burden of Truth is produced by ICF Films, Entertainment One and Eagle Vision. The series is created by Brad Simpson (Rookie Blue, King). Adam Pettle (Saving Hope, Nurses) returns as showrunner and will also write on Season 3. Burden of Truth is executive produced by Ilana Frank (Saving Hope, Rookie Blue, The Detail), Adam Pettle, Linda Pope (Saving Hope, Rookie Blue, The Detail), Brad Simpson, Jocelyn Hamilton (Mary Kills People, Cardinal), Kristin Kreuk and Eagle Vision’s Kyle Irving (Taken, Ice Road Truckers, Lovesick). Co-Executive producers are Lisa Meeches (Taken, Ice Road Truckers) and Tyson Caron (Lovesick, Wynter). For CBC, Sally Catto is General Manager, Programming; Trish Williams is Executive Director, Scripted Content; Helen Asimakis is Senior Director, Scripted Content; and Sarah Adams is Executive in Charge of Production.

BURDEN OF TRUTH is produced with the participation of the Canada Media Fund and Manitoba Film and Music, and with the assistance of the Government of Manitoba – Manitoba Film & Video Production Tax Credit, the Ontario Film and Television Tax Credit and the Canadian Film or Video Tax Credit. eOne holds worldwide distribution rights to the series.

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Preview: Never Too Old proves you can do anything regardless of age

As they say, age is just a number. That saying is driven home in the excellent, inspiring “Never Too Old.”

Debuting Thursday at 9 p.m. on CBC as part of CBC Docs POV, the project—from Dream Street Pictures, who made the equally excellent “Sickboy”—tells the story of 82-year-old Olive Bryanton who aims to earn her PhD, and documents the lives of women over 85 living in rural Canada.

Never one to relax, cameras capture Prince Edward Island native Olive as she works on her doctoral thesis at the University of Prince Edward Island. Her thesis? To prove most octogenarians and older defy the stereotype of taking it easy. Olive recruited 10 women aged 85-91, living in rural P.E.I., to document their busy lives and determine what support, if any, was there helping or hindering them in their lives.

“I’m sick and tired of hearing older adults are a burden on society, because they’re not,” Olive says. She, and the ladies we meet in “Never Too Old,” would run circles around me and a lot of younger folks I know. Like 91-year-old Theresa, a self-professed tomboy who delights in cutting the grass on her riding lawnmower and has “no notion of living anywhere else.” Or 88-year-old Anna, who is still active in her farming community; 87-year-old Ruby, the centre of her senior’s group; and 89-year-old Nan, who paints, revels in her “beautiful junk” and still feels sexual.

At the heart of Olive’s message is dropping the stigma that the older generation isn’t of value to society. As she points out, society’s focus is on those living in care facilities. But a mere 10 per cent of seniors are living in them. They’re active and they have something to say.

“I have never said to myself, ‘It’s too late to do something’ or ‘I’m too old to do something,'” Olive says. “That has never entered my mind.”

“Never Too Old” airs as part of CBC Docs POV on Thursday at 9 p.m. on CBC and streams on CBC Gem.

Image courtesy of CBC.

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Links: Andrew De Angelis talks Killjoys “A Bout, A Girl”

From Heather M. of TV Goodness:

Links: Andrew De Angelis talks Killjoys “A Bout, A Girl”
“I came in during the third season and I’m writing an episode in the last season that has a connection to where it all began, which was so cool for me to feel like, ‘I’m part of the history.’ It wasn’t a directive, but when the [callbacks] came up, it felt like a trip down memory lane and our own way of saying goodbye.” Continue reading.

From Bridget Liszewski of The TV Junkies:

Link: Killjoys: Andrew De Angelis talks “A Bout, A Girl”
“They have to come together as a unit, and not just physically. They have been through a veritable wringer this season, and though they are ’together’ now, they still have a lot of shit to work out between them. And until (or unless) they can do that, they’re not really Team Awesome Force. They’re just Team OK Force.” Continue reading. 

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